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Oculus
5/15/2007 12:49am,
Just wondered if anybody practises or knows much about this art I saw the other in a magazine. Taido. The art of fighting in 3-D. Does this post belong in newbie town?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taido

http://www.australiantaido.com/

Mas
5/15/2007 1:04pm,
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xzEJa_dhFfU
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NUjv_9r-6bk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R_PlRtZHaUM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6SaZWOWSSY

Here is my observational opinion:

Doubtless, it looks pretty, but it reminds me a lot of capoeira. They do sparring, but it looks like it's point sparring. I'm curious as to when someone actually gets hit, what exactly happens. It looks like a lot of choregraphed material, especially that 5 versus 1 stuff, that's cool to look at, but is just not realistic.

If you like gymnastics, or dancing, or if you want better conditioning, or you want to do whatever it is that they're doing, maybe this is for you.

If you want to learn to fight do something else.

Here is my real opinion:

That **** is XMA with magic pants.

TheBigSwede
5/15/2007 1:55pm,
From what I've seen of taido, I'd say it suffers from the same thing as aikido and other styles: little or no training with full speed against a resisting opponent. That deficiency (is that a suitable expression?) is not style-related. You can train whatever you like and still don't learn to fight unless you train at full resistance and speed.

Yes, even BJJ.

cafezinho
5/15/2007 4:34pm,
Looks more like Monkey Style Kungfu but with flips.

Lebell
5/15/2007 4:41pm,
i know a guy who teaches taido,i think its bullcrap.
there is an honbu (motherschool) somewhere in japan,and this guy is the embassador for it in Holland.
one time he was telling me about it,how 'complete'it was etc.
showed me some stuff and i wasnt really that impressed,it seems to me its one of those invented new mixed styles but without that aliveness etc.
two things i know for a fact: he went to some eskrima workshop for a weekend and started to teach eskrima in his classes...
plus he f*cked his knee up while doing a mae geri (straight forward kick) on a freaking kickbag....

not very impressive at all.and this guy was really official and all.

ojgsxr6
5/15/2007 4:49pm,
Isn't Taido the drum you hear in traditional Japanese music?

Lebell
5/15/2007 4:56pm,
taido or taito.
im not sure but in japanese its probably spelled different but in roman letters you spell it the same.
but tai do is also a ma style:tai means big or grand (like in overhead,more or less superior/ultimate) and do means way (as you probably know already)
so tai do is big way,or ultimate way.

DdlR
5/15/2007 5:21pm,
Isn't Taido the drum you hear in traditional Japanese music?

You're thinking of taiko.

DdlR
5/15/2007 5:47pm,
From what I've seen of taido, I'd say it suffers from the same thing as aikido and other styles: little or no training with full speed against a resisting opponent. That deficiency (is that a suitable expression?) is not style-related. You can train whatever you like and still don't learn to fight unless you train at full resistance and speed.

Yes, even BJJ.

I don't think that learning to fight in the sense of real-world self defense or MMA-style competition is a major taido priority; the object is to practice the art as a form of self discipline, recreation, etc. Like some forms of aikido, it's intended more as a physical manifestation of a philosophical principle than as a balls-out fighting method.

AFAIK the rules of taido sparring (as distinct from choreographed display techniques and kata) reward the student's ability to spontaneously pull off difficult, acrobatic techniques.

teebs
5/15/2007 8:00pm,
Hmm, my uni has a club for it, I'm tempted to go and check it out if I have time, but it doesn't really interest me much beyond seeing if they make claims about being good for fighting or something that they can't back up.

Gezere
5/15/2007 8:24pm,
From what I've seen of taido, I'd say it suffers from the same thing as aikido and other styles: little or no training with full speed against a resisting opponent. That deficiency (is that a suitable expression?) is not style-related. You can train whatever you like and still don't learn to fight unless you train at full resistance and speed.

Yes, even BJJ.
No not even BJJ.

That deficiency is indeed style related. Full resistance training is PART of the style itself. A BJJ school without rolling is like a judo school without throws. Just doesn't go right. That is why some styles are better than others. Their training methodology is part of their style.

Taido looks like a fun sport and hobby but not something I would trust my well being to. I don't like the sparring because its basically one good clean hit and thats the match, I think similar to Judo oand using the Ippon system.

DdlR
5/15/2007 9:08pm,
No not even BJJ.

That deficiency is indeed style related. Full resistance training is PART of the style itself. A BJJ school without rolling is like a judo school without throws. Just doesn't go right. That is why some styles are better than others. Their training methodology is part of their style.

I'm sure that BJJ is better than taido for BJJ-style competition and that taido is better than BJJ for taido-style competition.

DdlR
5/15/2007 11:47pm,
No **** Sherlock, are you looking to win the alternative nobel prize for your immense powers of observation.

If we're talking in terms of what is "better" and discussing "deficiencies", then it's worth pointing out that these concepts are relative.


From what I've seen of taido, I'd say it suffers from the same thing as aikido and other styles: little or no training with full speed against a resisting opponent. That deficiency (is that a suitable expression?) is not style-related.

Asia picked up on the idea of "deficiency" to make a valid point about the relationship between training methodology and style. The point I was hoping to reinforce was that some styles are better than others for certain purposes.

Just as there's no probably no value in training in taido if you're aiming to win the UFC, you'd be wasting time and effort by training in BJJ/Muay Thai if you wanted to compete or perform in taido.

I know it's obvious, but that perspective is often lost when people assume that everyone is (or "should be") after the same thing from their MA training.

Oculus
5/15/2007 11:54pm,
Speaking of checking these sort of clubs out. Is it good ettiqutte to go up to a school and ask to spar with a student there just to try the art out or a no no?

I'll have to brush up on my training for a few more months before I can do something like that but I think it'd be interesting fighting a style like that.

Edit: But isn't the danger that in these arts they claim to be able to teach a person how to fight effectively?

KenMasters
5/16/2007 1:33am,
Speaking of checking these sort of clubs out. Is it good ettiqutte to go up to a school and ask to spar with a student there just to try the art out or a no no?

I'll have to brush up on my training for a few more months before I can do something like that but I think it'd be interesting fighting a style like that.

Edit: But isn't the danger that in these arts they claim to be able to teach a person how to fight effectively?
I've done that before. A guy from my dojang was spending time at a shotokan school so I went so he could introduce me. Afterwards I asked to spar some of the people there. They were totally cool with it but sabaumnim didn't approve. I'd suggest attending one class just to watch, introduce yourself, and explain your intentions.
Back on topic, taido is very entertaining to watch. The more extravagent moves look a bit impracticle but I would assume they learn that after good basics. Kinda looks like karate meets capoeira.

DdlR
5/16/2007 2:19am,
Edit: But isn't the danger that in these arts they claim to be able to teach a person how to fight effectively?

Yes - that's part of the Bullshido mission, to challenge inaccurate claims.

On the other hand, and this point is also sometimes lost, to maintain integrity in your challenge, you have to be specific. If you start generalizing about "these arts", you're left open.

So - find a taido instructor who specifically says, "these acrobatic techniques will guarantee that you survive a streetfight or win the UFC" and then fire away. If what they're really saying is "we do this because it's fun, good exercise and adds meaning to our lives," then you can still disagree, but it's no longer a case of Bullshido, just a matter of different strokes for different folks.