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Ke?poFist
3/18/2007 5:53pm,
I know all styles of martial arts require some form of discipline, but which one do you guys think takes the most discipline to excel at? I think TKD, but I know Kung Fu has more forms, and that sounds like it takes a lot of time. Thoughts?

Ronin.74
3/18/2007 6:28pm,
I think that BJJ easily takes the most dedication, but I am not sure if you could equate that to discipline. IMO they all pretty much take about the same amount of discipline if you really want to be exceptionally skilled.

alex
3/18/2007 6:30pm,
anything that involves competition. the self discipline required to perform well in any sport is higher than what most people possess.

Axelton
3/18/2007 7:20pm,
Kempo this thread of yours already crashed and burned on MAP for being too fruity. Im actually surprised it has these 2 serious responses already.

vinhthekid
3/18/2007 7:35pm,
bjj, wrestling, thai boxing, boxing. anything that requires you to come in day after day even though you'e bruised, battered in pain and just don't want to do it.

colonelpong
3/18/2007 7:36pm,
Too fruity for MAP? For shame!

But, to answer your question: Ninjitsu takes thew most discipline. WHy? Because they have to keep a straight face whilst doing this kind of ****...



http://www.kokuryunz.co.nz/photos/jap_garden_rocks.jpg

Ke?poFist
3/18/2007 7:54pm,
Christ it took Temppong to come up with a somewhat worthwhile response :)

Axel: So am I, lol

RunningDog
3/18/2007 8:17pm,
The answer is Wing Chun. It takes dedication to keep coming back to class for years for a spot of trapping, when it's clear you haven't the faintest chance of learning how to fight.

wackamole
3/18/2007 8:25pm,
Judo. Specifically the stand up throwing. The learning curve is pretty flat. It can take people up to a year or more to learn to apply one throw (not counting the double leg/ankle pick stuff).

Some guys who go onto solid competitive careers as college students experience years of losing as a kid.

FUNKtastic
3/18/2007 11:06pm,
Judo. Specifically the stand up throwing. The learning curve is pretty flat. It can take people up to a year or more to learn to apply one throw (not counting the double leg/ankle pick stuff).

Some guys who go onto solid competitive careers as college students experience years of losing as a kid.

100% agree and some guys even make one move into a career.

though most come to possess variation which is easier if you are the mor experienced player i've seen people go into tournaments with one move and apply it repeatedly until it worked. first guy i fought tried the same move several times and got ippon in the end. i knew that it was coming but eventually my defense slipped and he scored.

also in uchi komi, when you are practicing the throw with a semi-compliant partner, you really have to push yourself to do the throw the right timing and speed because though you can half ass it here and in moving uchi-komi you're hurting yourself in randori. compared to tkd forms i did as a kid where comittment to the form varied based on how much energy i had that day seems like it taske more dedication.

FUNKtastic
3/18/2007 11:06pm,
Judo. Specifically the stand up throwing. The learning curve is pretty flat. It can take people up to a year or more to learn to apply one throw (not counting the double leg/ankle pick stuff).

Some guys who go onto solid competitive careers as college students experience years of losing as a kid.

100% agree and some guys even make one move into a career.

though most come to possess variation which is easier if you are the mor experienced player i've seen people go into tournaments with one move and apply it repeatedly until it worked. first guy i fought tried the same move several times and got ippon in the end. i knew that it was coming but eventually my defense slipped and he scored.

also in uchi komi, when you are practicing the throw with a semi-compliant partner, you really have to push yourself to do the throw the right timing and speed because though you can half ass it here and in moving uchi-komi you're hurting yourself in randori. compared to tkd forms i did as a kid where comittment to the form varied based on how much energy i had that day seems like it taske more dedication.

roly
3/18/2007 11:26pm,
i'd say something with no contact and no sparring

i mean, youd have to be dedicated to keep coming back to something so unbearably boring long enough to get a black belt.

things like bjj and judo are fun, it doesnt take much dedication to do something thats fun.

Crazyman
3/19/2007 12:10am,
i'd say something with no contact and no sparring

i mean, youd have to be dedicated to keep coming back to something so unbearably boring long enough to get a black belt.

things like bjj and judo are fun, it doesnt take much dedication to do something thats fun.

I once took a TKD class that was no contact sparring, both ITF and WTF forms, along with One Steps, and teh r34l One Steps (Because even kids and soccer moms knew the traditional One Steps were too fruity to work in real life.)

We spent 40 minutes out of an hour long class working on forms and one steps.

B-O-R-I-N-G!

Zio_Missile
3/19/2007 2:40am,
any ma that requires full contact sparring , competitions , lots of cardio ,lots of strenght training or both , dieting and cutting weight for maintain a weight class

The Question
3/19/2007 3:16am,
I know all styles of martial arts require some form of discipline, but which one do you guys think takes the most discipline to excel at? I think TKD, but I know Kung Fu has more forms, and that sounds like it takes a lot of time. Thoughts?

People are disciplined, styles are not disciplined. I can religiously practice my 540 hook kick, or I can religiously practice my armbars oomoplatas. What's the difference?

KaneElson
3/19/2007 3:57am,
Aikido
It simply doesn't have the instant "OMG I CAN BASH YOU LOL111!!11ONE" gratification that harder arts have. You have to train for many many many years to realise the true Aikido.