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View Full Version : Stupid things you used to believe about martial arts




feral00
2/17/2010 11:29am,
that one shot could ko a guy

that taking on 3 or 4 guys would be easy

Ha, I definitely used to believe that one.
And I believed that a flying side kick was the greatest move, and unblockable one kit KO.

Larus marinus
2/17/2010 11:30am,
That you need a minimum of athletic ability and social skills to go far in budo. You don't. In some arts I would say it's even an advantage to be a fat and socially handicapped geek.

It's fine to be really skinny too. Added muscle mass affects your speed but good *true* budo is all about balance and leverage combined with intelligence anyway - only knuckle-dragging thugs and knuckle-dragging sportfighting thugs use strength. :happy8:

pokeroo
2/17/2010 11:45am,
that one shot could ko a guy

that taking on 3 or 4 guys would be easy

I believed in the one shot KO too. So did the founders of karate apparently. That's why I thought they had point sparring. I also believed that they focused on delivering a single hard punch because karate was used by unarmed farmers to defeat armoured and armed samurai, as though a hard punch to samurai armour would do anything but slightly annoy an opponent.

How did I overlook that people were able to continue in point sparring after being hit? I wasn't aware that they were supposed to pull punches or anything like that.

Larus marinus
2/17/2010 11:54am,
Ha, I definitely used to believe that one.
And I believed that a flying side kick was the greatest move, and unblockable one kit KO.

There was quite a bit of controversy in the British press about nunchaku when I was growing up - I'm not exactly sure why but the BBFC always made a big deal about scenes depicting their use in movies and almost always ordered the offending sections removed before the film was permitted a rating (Enter The Dragon and Game Of Death were only finally released uncut in the UK in the 2000s, IIRC), so there was always this 'dangerous mystique' about them. Then, mainly due to the appearance of nunchaku in (and subsequent editing from) the Teenage Mutant Ninja (or Hero) Turtles cartoon, it all blew up in the tabloids.

There was loads of sensationalistic crap about gangs of baddies going around using 'chucks on innocent citizens at night, kids hurting each other with them, hooligans using them on the football terraces and how the 'chucks were, like the most fearsome, vicious and brutal weapon ever devised.

Of course, as a young boy, I believed all that - and I *really* wanted a pair of real nunchaku. So I could have the best deadly of all and **** up anyone who messed with me.

This was long before all the hoo-ha about knives and swords - which they didn't seem that bothered about people owning back then.

Larus marinus
2/17/2010 12:01pm,
I believed in the one shot KO too. So did the founders of karate apparently. That's why I thought they had point sparring. I also believed that they focused on delivering a single hard punch because karate was used by unarmed farmers to defeat armoured and armed samurai, as though a hard punch to samurai armour would do anything but slightly annoy an opponent.

How did I overlook that people were able to continue in point sparring after being hit? I wasn't aware that they were supposed to pull punches or anything like that.

Did you ever believe the '360/720 jumping tornado kicks were originally devised to enable the user to kick samurai from their horses' thing? I've had more than one person repeat that to me as the gospel truth.

Kovacs
2/17/2010 12:02pm,
This was long before all the hoo-ha about knives and swords - which they didn't seem that bothered about people owning back then.

I remember those heady days. I could buy a 6" knife, replica BB guns, catapults or air pistols becouse I could grow a beard at 15 however I needed to show my Wing Chun license at a martial arts shop to buy two pairs of chucks.

Ironic that you'd do yourself more damage with the chucks than any of the others combined.

Larus marinus
2/17/2010 12:13pm,
I remember those heady days. I could buy a 6" knife, replica BB guns, catapults or air pistols becouse I could grow a beard at 15 however I needed to show my Wing Chun license at a martial arts shop to buy two pairs of chucks.

Ironic that you'd do yourself more damage with the chucks than any of the others combined.

I bought a 'ninja sword' (i.e. shitty wallhanger katana), which I then proceeded to LARP in and around my house with, with money my nan had given me - at the age of 10! No-one cared about that. If I'd done the same with nunchaku however, it would've made me a significant danger to society...

It was also a similar situation with teh 'ninja stars', I think.

pokeroo
2/17/2010 12:21pm,
Did you ever believe the '360/720 jumping tornado kicks were originally devised to enable the user to kick samurai from their horses' thing? I've had more than one person repeat that to me as the gospel truth.

No, because as far as I ever knew that stuff was Tae Kwon Do, or korean improvised karate, and I knew there were no samurai in Korea. However I did believe that the flying side kick was used for the purpose of knocking cavalry off their horses in karate and kung fu. How could I believe otherwise when I read it in a book? Of course I hadn't seen to many horses up close to realize how absurd that is.

The ninja star thing... I don't know if its true but I remember hearing that its a restricted or prohibited weapon in Canada. When I later got involved in bujinkan that's why they only had shiruken. Of course it very well be the case that the ninja star is seen by our government as similar to the butterfly knife (which I heard is also restricted or prohibited).

Larus marinus
2/17/2010 12:36pm,
No, because as far as I ever knew that stuff was Tae Kwon Do, or korean improvised karate, and I knew there were no samurai in Korea. However I did believe that the flying side kick was used for the purpose of knocking cavalry off their horses in karate and kung fu. How could I believe otherwise when I read it in a book? Of course I hadn't seen to many horses up close to realize how absurd that is.

The ninja star thing... I don't know if its true but I remember hearing that its a restricted or prohibited weapon in Canada. When I later got involved in bujinkan that's why they only had shiruken. Of course it very well be the case that the ninja star is seen by our government as similar to the butterfly knife (which I heard is also restricted or prohibited).

I'm pretty sure that ninja stars are illegal in the UK. As are butterfly knives, flickknives, sword canes, knuckledusters, blackjacks, saps, telescopic batons - and of course (nearly all) handguns.

TuckerBlue
2/21/2010 2:31pm,
(10 years from now)

I remember when I thought BJJ and Muay Thai were the ****, then a [insert future MA] guy kicked my ass. LOL, I was a retard!

:P

pokeroo
2/21/2010 2:40pm,
(10 years from now)

I remember when I thought BJJ and Muay Thai were the ****, then a [insert future MA] guy kicked my ass. LOL, I was a retard!

:P

I think that's less likely because of mma. We used to think karate and kung fu were the **** because of movies the myth and all of that. mma gave everything a chance to be tested in the ring in a situation loosely resembling no holds barred. It turns out muay thai, bjj, judo, boxing, and wrestling are the most common among successful mma athletes, perhaps because they have a history of being pressure tested. But some time has passed already and I think we have seen with athletes such as Lyoto Machita that its only partly the martial art, and the other part is the athlete and their training.

MMAMickey
2/21/2010 7:28pm,
nah, i don't reckon machida all that much. His tactics only really seem to work against boxers otherwise he gets his legs kicked to **** or makes a really really boring fight

pokeroo
2/22/2010 10:57am,
nah, i don't reckon machida all that much. His tactics only really seem to work against boxers otherwise he gets his legs kicked to **** or makes a really really boring fight

I don't wanna bring this thread way off topic for real long but... The guy has a flawless record. I've seen the Shogun fight, I admit he should have lost that one, but that's one fight in his entire career. Boring =/= ineffective. The guy is an example of someone using a style that everyone thought would be useless to become a champion because he was able to train well, and incorporate just the right amount of other elements into his game. It's an example of the fighter making the difference.

franklinlvrz
2/22/2010 12:28pm,
Bullshit Martial Arts Beliefs as a kid

1. My "Ninjutsu" Sensei was most dangerous man alive and he could kill anything

2. My combined 6 yrs of "Ninjutsu" and Karate meant that i could beat up atleast 85% of the human population.

3. Shaolin Kung Fu masters were the closest thing to God on Earth

4. Chi is real and screaming KIIIAAAA!!! made my attacks stronger.

5. If is shadow box enough i will be fast enough to catch arrows (Ronald Duncan style)

6. Grappling is Gay and ineffective

All of these notions came to a ego shattering halt after a few months of BJJ

Necroyunus
2/23/2010 1:33am,
I thought bjj/mma groundwork doesn't have any technique included at all. Just two people like pretzels.

Just knowing how to do armbar from mount, guillotine and few other techniques are enough to beat people (no position knowledge, control at all)

bakdosh
2/24/2010 11:39am,
I thought judo was a very soft and gentle MA, actually that the only thing softer than that would be yoga, and thought that the training was way less hardcore than "kung-fu" or shotokan karate training -and I was training in udo already at the time. Just because it was grappling and no strikes (and probably because I started very young). That's until I took interest in actually how they train elsewhere and in other MA, and realized judo isn't really for sissies, and went back to training in it.

I thought that BJJ was Capoeira with a few standing armlocks. Until I sparred with a guy and thought that his judo was unusual. I had no interest in UFC at the time, and no internet, and it was a freaking surprise.

I thought Ninjutsu guys where deadly and sparred for real in hardcore conditions, with throws on rocks or fighting knee deep in the river, etc.