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View Full Version : Stupid things you used to believe about martial arts




Big Dozer
5/27/2009 8:11am,
If you had a black belt you were kinda like a ninja.
If you had a black belt that meant you could beat up a guy 3 times your size and do it with ease.

I thought this when I was like 4-8 years old. Then I ran into some kids at school(who showed their black belts during Show-N-Tell) get beat up pretty easily.

TheWanderingTaoist
5/30/2009 8:28pm,
i heard that so many times, what always got me was this. TKD is a kicking art. why not register your feet instead?

it's like telling a car owner he needs to get a dog license.

Because in TKD our feet are deadly weapons. That's why we register our hands and keep our secret weapons secret from even the police!

TheWanderingTaoist
5/30/2009 8:36pm,
This reminds me of something funny. Once after class I stopped at the store to rent a video and I think I was wearing my dobak pants and a tee that said TKD. I was of course standing in the martial arts video section and this guy who was like 45 asks me so are you a black belt? I'm like "yeah why?". Then he starts asking all this crazy **** like "so you can break boards? you can break bricks?" And since yeah I'd tried that and done that I said yeah. Then he kept on asking these goofy questions which I was at this point trying to ignore then he asked "so you can bend steel poles in half?". I wasn't even thinking and I answered "uh-huh" and walked away from him because it was like having a dang groupie. After that this weirdo dude started stalking me showing up at both the schools I studied at. ****! But isn't that just weird at his age as a non-martial artist he apparently thought everything in the Ninja Turtles movies was real?

henshinx
5/30/2009 9:04pm,
I thought karate was all I needed to be an effective fighter

socratic
5/30/2009 9:58pm,
Tijqun???????? If you were to ask any Mandarin Chinese person what tijqun means, they would say 'tai chi' and think of their granny doing their morning exercise in the park.

My Auntie, for example, does tijqun every morning because it is the proper, original way of saying 'tai chi' in Mandarin.

Sounds to me as if someone's learning MMA and passing it off as a centuries old Chinese martial art again. Sometimes I wish I didn't have Chinese origins...

Wow, you've never heard of Chinese martialism prior to the Communist takeover? That's sad, dude. I suggest you look up Chen style taijiquen stat, because I can assure you there are clans of taiji fighters who disagree with you.

Arcan
5/31/2009 8:52pm,
I used to think the reason my instructor could take my horse-stance reverse punches to his solar plexus without reaction was his phenomenal conditioning, not the complete ineffectiveness of the technique. I also used to think that an effective uppercut started at waist level (although Mike Tyson's Punch-Out shares the blame). Also, I believed if someone attacked me with a knife I could just grab their wrist and step past them causing them to stabs themselves in the gut.

Big Gorilla
6/01/2009 1:04pm,
Wow, you've never heard of Chinese martialism prior to the Communist takeover? That's sad, dude. I suggest you look up Chen style taijiquen stat, because I can assure you there are clans of taiji fighters who disagree with you.
An insult - calling me 'sad?' I must commit suicide immediately. The shame, the shame, I can't stand it. What will my ancestors do? Now a little education for you.

My (Chinese) family and friends of family pre-date Chinese Communism and my mother who was born in the 1930s even owned a little red book. My (Chinese) grandparents and some my family died during the Japanese invasions and the nationalist (Communist) insurgency in Malaysia and in some were Communists. This means my family's knowledge and practice of Tai Chi pre-dates Chinese Communism.

In addition, I am friendly with some of the Tai Pei crowd who did a runner from mainland China and from the Japanese ('the rape of Nanking' wiki will give you an idea of what went down) and they practice pre-Communist tai chi.

The survivors lived through war and none of them recalled Tai Chi being used for anything except gentle exercise pre-Communism.

Does this mean I am 100% right? No, of course not, as 10 family anecdotes do not constitute data. However, this anecdotal evidence is clearly strong enough to colour my personal opinion. In addition, no tai chi photos, drawings, paintings or films exist showing tai chi practitioners fighting each other pre-war that I am aware of.

This means 'fighting' tai chi looks like a recent invention to me, albeit with clear, martial roots. Reviving the roots is fine but 'fighting' tai chi looks new.

Sri Hanuman
6/01/2009 1:08pm,
An insult - calling me 'sad?' I must commit suicide immediately. The shame, the shame, I can't stand it. What will my ancestors do? Now a little education for you.

My (Chinese) family and friends of family pre-date Chinese Communism and my mother who was born in the 1930s even owned a little red book. My (Chinese) grandparents and some my family died during the Japanese invasions and the nationalist (Communist) insurgency in Malaysia and in some were Communists. This means my family's knowledge and practice of Tai Chi pre-dates Chinese Communism.

In addition, I am friendly with some of the Tai Pei crowd who did a runner from mainland China and from the Japanese ('the rape of Nanking' wiki will give you an idea of what went down) and they practice pre-Communist tai chi.

The survivors lived through war and none of them recalled Tai Chi being used for anything except gentle exercise pre-Communism.

Does this mean I am 100% right? No, of course not, as 10 family anecdotes do not constitute data. However, this anecdotal evidence is clearly strong enough to colour my personal opinion. In addition, no tai chi photos, drawings, paintings or films exist showing tai chi practitioners fighting each other pre-war that I am aware of.

This means 'fighting' tai chi looks like a recent invention to me, albeit with clear, martial roots. Reviving the roots is fine but 'fighting' tai chi looks new.

Mind you, pre-1800's, tai chi really was a mostly unknown family art. Furthermore, it is generally accepted that the tai chi that was taught and publicized outside the Chen village and Yang family, was heavily modified and softened, hence the old people image.

So yep, not surprising that many people only remember the old people in the park bit.

Big Gorilla
6/01/2009 7:39pm,
Mind you, pre-1800's, tai chi really was a mostly unknown family art. Furthermore, it is generally accepted that the tai chi that was taught and publicized outside the Chen village and Yang family, was heavily modified and softened, hence the old people image.

So yep, not surprising that many people only remember the old people in the park bit.
I don't know but I'm going to take a stab at this (I may be horribly wrong but bear with me).

Take a look at this link to a silk dating to 206 - 24 years BC: http://www.geocities.com/ycgf/images/styles/qigong2.jpg Some of the positions are Tai Chi as well as Qigong which indicates Qigong is an ancestral relation of Tai Chi. It is all 'soft.' There is Chinese writing / description specific to each of the positions.

If Tai Chi is descended from 2,000+ year old Qigong then Tai Chi could have been reasonably widespread and was always 'soft.'

However, going back to the topic, this is just something I 'believed' since I was a kid but am probably wrong. I am just waiting for the evidence.

Sri Hanuman
6/01/2009 9:32pm,
I don't know but I'm going to take a stab at this (I may be horribly wrong but bear with me).

Take a look at this link to a silk dating to 206 - 24 years BC: http://www.geocities.com/ycgf/images/styles/qigong2.jpg Some of the positions are Tai Chi as well as Qigong which indicates Qigong is an ancestral relation of Tai Chi. It is all 'soft.' There is Chinese writing / description specific to each of the positions.

If Tai Chi is descended from 2,000+ year old Qigong then Tai Chi could have been reasonably widespread and was always 'soft.'

However, going back to the topic, this is just something I 'believed' since I was a kid but am probably wrong. I am just waiting for the evidence.

There was recently a thread on this in the CMA section. I don't want to derail this thread, but if you want more info along with sources, feel free to pm me, or check out this thread.

Question About Temple Style Taiji Quan - No BS Martial Arts (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=84177)

You can also go to this page for a brief historic outline.
http://geocities.com/bgtaiji/about.html

I have a small library dedicated to history of Taiji, although others on this forum most likely have better info than myself.

Basically, Taijiquan = amalgamation of Shaolin MA and Taoist Qi Gong. A bit more complex than that, but this is the nutshell.

Taijiquan <> older than the 1600s. It only became public in the 1800s when Yang Luchan brought it over to teach in Beijing. He was forced to teach the Imperial guards. Some say he decided to slow soften and the art considerably, which is what we see today.

Hope that helps.

Cheers.

/derail

pokeroo
6/07/2009 3:38am,
Just thought I'd share some of the things I used to believe. When I was little I thought karate strikes were effective. I also thought hay bailers were too. When I took Ninjutsu I learned wrist locks and armlocks that are effective, however I saw the more "advanced" level students apply these as a counter to a punch and thought this was an effective technique. I used to beleive in Chi energy, chakras, and that one could gain supernatural powers through meditation. I used to think tha karatekas could only throw punches from the chambered position at their waste. I used to beleive in all sorts of b.s. about kung fu including that tai chi is unbeatable if one trains in it properly for over 10 years. I also used to beleive that if your reflexes were fast enough, you could scissor the arm of a karateka when they go to punch you such that it would snap at the elbow.

pokeroo
6/07/2009 3:44am,
Oh, this isn't me but I think this is funny. Recently I started mauy thai kickboxing. I told my parents who both would not know what muay thai is, and they thought that was cool. Then later I showed my mom my boxing gloves and she said "I thought kickboxing was done only with your feet."

SonofSpiridonov
6/07/2009 4:38am,
Choson Ninja made me interested in the Martial Arts

I seriously considered suing my current JJJ dojo when i was a noob and found out we sparred full/rolled contact

A "martial artist" can under all circumstances beat anyone at all except like other ten years more experienced "martial artists" (rd. Wing Chun, Ninjutsu, Five Animals, Hapkido etc, etc REAL MARTIAL ARTISTS!!!111).

I taught that the interviews held with UFC fighters pre fight when its always insinuated how much they hate eachother were a 100% true.



I started martial arts late in my teens. I knew basically nothing about them before that. So the whole thing about aliveness, fighting and actually training really came out of left field for me. Luckily this site saved me and im growing more and more devoted to MMA and the Bullshido.net cause every day.
I try and keep an open mind but i have no tolerance for LARP.

mike321
6/07/2009 12:00pm,
I used to think the reason my instructor could take my horse-stance reverse punches to his solar plexus without reaction was his phenomenal conditioning, not the complete ineffectiveness of the technique. I also used to think that an effective uppercut started at waist level (although Mike Tyson's Punch-Out shares the blame). Also, I believed if someone attacked me with a knife I could just grab their wrist and step past them causing them to stabs themselves in the gut.

Just read this, even an arm strike with no hips to the solar plexus of someone not moving should get some reaction.

Flail_Crapple
6/08/2009 3:35pm,
I seriously considered suing my current JJJ dojo when i was a noob and found out we sparred full/rolled contact


Really? What was your rationale behind that?

Chenz
6/08/2009 11:13pm,
When I first discovered MMA on TV, I thought that the fighters had to be nut cases, psychopaths, borderline retarded, and unable to make a living any other way, and that most of them would be in prison if they did not have this barely legal outlet for their unremittingly aggressive natures. I was truly surprised at the general level of intelligence and self possession that the fighters displayed in interviews on subsequent shows.

(Non-essential anecdote: One of the first fighters I saw interviewed in a documentary, Dateline or something like it, was Uriah Faber on his way up, before he was even a contender. I was amazed that he seemed like a normal guy who could turn violence on and off at will, and fight like that without hatred or rage. This was probably five years ago and I didn't remember his name, but Uriah has a fairly distinctive chin so I recognized him as soon as I discovered the WEC on Versus on the new cable TV system.)

Before I started training jiu-jitsu and Muay Thai earlier this year, I expected that many of my fellow students would be cocky, aggressive, macho types who would beat up noobs in class to feed their own egos. Maybe I was blessed to stumble into a great school on my first try, but the guys that I roll with are a humble, helpful, and altogether mellow bunch. (Not to say that I don't get beat up, but I'm finding that is a key part of my learning process.)

Oh, and I kind of believed that The Karate Kid was plausible, that whole wax on-wax off, standing on one leg on the scenic coast while meditating at sunset would prepare one to deal with the Cobra Kai bullies. And get the nice girl ...