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Matt W.
10/28/2006 10:30am,
DOC is offering to send some of us to this seminar. Because of my generally poor view of RBSD, the advertising rhetoric set off a lot of warning bells for me. The website is

http://www.calibrepress.com/

Though you have to register to view. The main instrctor seems to be a "Dave Smith". Anyone heard of them? Anyone been to one of these seminars? Is it legit, or more RBSD bullshit?

Matt W.
10/28/2006 1:37pm,
Did a little quick research at their site and google. Found mention of them on several LE websites. A few positive reviews. Nothing negative. Several of their instructors are cops from the chicago IL area. No connections to any known bullshido/rbsd artists.

So, it's probably legit.

Still, if anyone has first hand experience, let me know.

rw4th
10/28/2006 2:43pm,
No first hand experience, but I can you that Calibre Press has been around for a LONG time and I have never heard anything bad about their Street Survival seminars. I also know that few of their books are required reading in some police sciences programs.

Nosurrender
10/28/2006 3:04pm,
I hate seminars but their stuff is the real mccoy and actually has nothing to do with TMA CMA JMA FMA RBSD TKD JKD BJJ or any other alphabet soup and they don't solicit superduperpower chi blasting in there or throwing a 600lbs sumo wrestler across a room with 1 hour of training so no complaints here.

Sam Browning
10/28/2006 3:39pm,
I have their tape on sharp force attacks. There is a bit of good information on it, but its buried under sensationalistic bullcrap.

FJJ
10/29/2006 4:08am,
Probably not a lot of experience on this forum with Calibre Press except among LEOs. It is a highly respected LE training group. With that being said, the "Street Survival" seminar is not a DT or combatives course. It is a lecture, photo and video presentation designed to inform, prepare and inspire officers (and in some cases, their families) to survive critical incidents and violent confrontations. It is not generally a "hands on" tactics course although they may reference some tactics courses and demo some material.

Calibre Press bought out LETN and PoliceOne I believe. Dave Smith is the John Madden of Law Enforcement training. He is a charismatic spokesperson and former Arizona police officer.

Matt W.
10/29/2006 12:15pm,
Excellent. I really wasn't expecting any responses, and I'm glad I got some. Everything seems to jive with what little I picked up on myself, so far.


its buried under sensationalistic bullcrap.

Mmmm-hmmm. This is what set off my warning bells in the first place. Their ad had several things in it that I didn't like. For example, it toughted their "internationally recognized instructors" without naming the instructors or who recognizes them internationally. Also it was filled with the typical RBSD sounding hype about "learning to survive violent assaults and protect your loved ones" (my paraphrase) and using a bunch of meaningless descriptors like "dynamic" "visually stunning" and whatnot.

But, for all that, it appears legit. If I can go, I will and will write a review.

Sam Browning
10/29/2006 12:32pm,
Excellent. I really wasn't expecting any responses, and I'm glad I got some. Everything seems to jive with what little I picked up on myself, so far.



Mmmm-hmmm. This is what set off my warning bells in the first place. Their ad had several things in it that I didn't like. For example, it toughted their "internationally recognized instructors" without naming the instructors or who recognizes them internationally. Also it was filled with the typical RBSD sounding hype about "learning to survive violent assaults and protect your loved ones" (my paraphrase) and using a bunch of meaningless descriptors like "dynamic" "visually stunning" and whatnot.

But, for all that, it appears legit. If I can go, I will and will write a review.

Yeh, let me provide a couple examples. On the Caliber tape I have they waste a lot of film showing Leo Gaje move a knife around. Now Leo is a great martial artist but it really accomplished nothing instructionally, it was just visual eye candy. The same with the scene in which they show some idiot loading up with about 10 concealed knives and then the officers then go search him. Then there was the scene (and I'm not joking) when the officers enter a house or apartment and some nutty woman is doing pagan or satanic rituals and they have to shoot her. Now this may have happened somewhere, but its not a high percentage situation. Some of their material on a law enforcement officer using positioning to get an obstical in between him and the knife holder to prevent the rush was worth while but in the back of the tape.

FJJ
10/29/2006 4:47pm,
I attended in 1999. It was a good experience. Keep in mind that 95% of the attendees don't train. The seminar is geared more towards firing those people up more that it is giving someone who trains a new tool. The audiences are HUGE. The one I went to had 800-1000 people from all over. Lots of dashboard video reviews and presentations about tactics and lessons learned.

Don't try to be technically critical. It is dumbed down enough for the majority of the audience. The seminar gets it's message across well enough. I enjoyed it and would go back again, although not every year. Once is enough for most and once every few years is enough for just about anyone.

OnceLost
10/30/2006 9:00pm,
No reviews on Dave Smith, but here's a little information for you.

Calibre Press put out a couple Charles Remsberg's books, which is where a great deal of the information in the seminar has traditionally come from (or vice versa). The books are Street Survival: Tactics for Armed Encounters, Tactical Edge: Surviving High Risk Patrol, and Tactics for Criminal Patrol: Vehicle Stops, Drug Discovery & Officer Survival. The books are at work, so I'm going from memory here (and I don't have a copy of the last one anymore), so bear with me:
Essentially, the books emphasize a 'survival mind-set,' ("Come hell or high water, I AM going home at the end of shift") and numerous object lessons warning against complacency. The tactics are useful, generally practical, and usually have the more 'alert' people wondering why something so basic needs to be reviewed. If I remember correctly, the few techniques even mentioned in the book were definitely aimed at the people who weren't ever going to actually practice outside of mandatory training. Just the horror stories in the books are enough to make you want to go train...

My vote would be for going to the seminar. You might hear stuff you've heard, but than you might hear something new.