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drummingman
10/11/2006 10:11pm,
i know that i have posted a few threads asking about different styles of martal arts.i don't know if this is the right place to do so but i have another question.
i really like aikido but i am looking for a style that also has strikes and grond fighting mixed into it.i have been looking into jujitsu and i have a few questions about it.
so here it goes:what style of jujitsu does aikido get its throws from were the person uses the attackers own momentum against them? what style of jujitsu has punches and kicks that are offensive and defensive?
i know that there is daito-ruy(which i think has standing up and ground fighting) and brazilian jujitsu(which i know is mostly ground fighting) and other styles of jujitsu.im looking for something that deals with the standing up and the ground fighting.and like i was saying before,i really like the aikido throws so thats why i want to know what style of jujitsu they come from.
thanks for the help.

Phrost
10/11/2006 10:15pm,
Newbietown off the port bow.

Shinshoryu
10/11/2006 10:23pm,
Man I can feel it, you are going to feel the wrath of bullshido.net.

Res Judicata
10/11/2006 10:28pm,
Aikido techniques come almost exclusively from Daito-ryu aiki jujutsu. Daito-ryu has more techniques and more martial techniques than Aikido. Those kind of techniques can look impressive, and some even work. But most schools do not teach in a way that is likely to get you good technique. Of course, if you're just looking for something fun to do and not something that's good self defense, Aikido can be fun.

Brazillian JJ techniques come (mostly) from Judo, but strongly emphasizes the groundwork aspect. BJJ later added techiques from wrestling, Sambo (itself derived from Judo, in part) and a lot of whatever works from other arts. Judo techniques mostly came from two older schools of Japanese jujutsu. Nearly all schools of jujustu will use the attacker's momentum against them. But you probably mean aikido-like things.

Most styles use punches and kicks offensively and defensively. But you probably mean attacking the attack sort of thing. Don't go there.

Some BJJ schools teach striking, others not so much.

Lets start with this: what martial arts schools are near you? What are your goals (self defense, get in shape, sport, fun?)

Wolf
10/11/2006 10:31pm,
just a friendly note of advice while you're here in newbietown. You're not going to get much a positive response on aikido here because very few schools train in a resistive alive manner, which most believe is necessary for adequate self defense training.

As for your question yes BJJ is primarily ground oriented. Daito-Ryu is the system Aikido is based on with some added chinese influence. If you want strikes included you'll have to go somewhere else. By nature, most jujutsu is not strike oriented at all. That's why a lot of people here either train MMA or do a couple of arts in order to get both grappling and striking.

Kayne
10/11/2006 10:47pm,
I am not trolling you, dude, but after a comma and a full stop, you put a space. And the first letter in each sentence is capitalised. Otherwise your posts are hard to read or take seriously.

That notwithstanding, there are two general categories of jujitsu (or juijitsu, jujutsu, or whatever): Japanese Jujitsu (or JJJ, which would include Daito-ryu, and many other styles), and Brazilian Jujitsu (or BJJ, which, for most people, generally describes martial arts that focus primarily on groundwork). Aikido was developed from JJJ. Many styles of JJJ incorporate striking and BJJ-type groundwork (http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-4884377133928056072&q=BJJ) (although nowhere as good, in all likelyhood) into their syllabus, which also generally includes takedowns (hip-throws, footsweeps, wrist-throws, and other assorted types), standing arm- and wrist-locks, ground based arm- and wrist-locks, and leglocks.

If you have the resources (in time, interest, and cash) you are generally better off training in martial arts that specifically focus on each aspect of fighting that your are interested in improving. Failing that, a well run JJJ school (with good sparring and randori) can cover those aspects sufficiently.

black mariah
10/11/2006 11:31pm,
This seems like a good place to ask since it's along the lines of what the OP is looking for...

Is there any such thing as a judo club that practices atemi-waza? Every one of them I know of concentrates more on the sport aspect, which is perfectly fine with me, but the fact that striking is so... I don't know... irrelevant to judo is kind of annoying.

drummingman
10/11/2006 11:38pm,
Sorry phrost about posting in the wrong place.A all questions like this supposed to be posted here in newbietown?
And sorry about the no capitals kayne.i never use them for some reason even when i write with a pin.
here are a few places near where i live http://www.members.aol.com/koshinage/
http://www.budoshinjujitsu.org/
tell me what you guys think.
Im not wanting to get into any spiritual stuff and i don't know if jujitsu has any of that stuff.

Kayne
10/12/2006 1:21am,
Grammar just wants to be your friend. Why do you scorn it so?

Unfortunately, there's only a little information on those sites. Your best bet is to actually go to each school and witness firsthand how they train before you make any commitments.

Generally, jujitsu tends to lack the spiritual stuff, but it will differ from school to school.

The first school seems pretty promising, with fairly low cost, and open mat time. But you should go to both places and make the decision for yourself. Check out the schools' policy on sparring and resistance training.

Black Mariah, a true judo school will not have a atemi-waza syllabus, as judo is a non-striking, competion based art.

drummingman
10/12/2006 1:39am,
lol Thats was a funny coment kayne.
yeah i hope to check out both schools.they are both about an hour from my house but they are the schools that are the closest to me that teach jujitsu that i would want to look into.

Locu5
10/12/2006 5:42am,
It really sounds like you are actually looking for an MMA school. What choices are near you?

Res Judicata
10/12/2006 10:19am,
Kayne: A few Judo schools will practice atemi waza, but they tend to be of the less sporty, more "traditional" variety. It is part of the curriculum, like kata. Most sporty places won't do much or any kata either (except Randori No Kata for Shodan). A few traditionalists will also do the atemi as part of the warmup. Or they have Judo at one time and "jujutsu" (Judo with strikes and self-defense applications) another.

In general you are correct: most places don't practice atemi. And, regardless, traditional Judo atemi sucks.

black mariah
10/12/2006 3:04pm,
Black Mariah, a true judo school will not have a atemi-waza syllabus, as judo is a non-striking, competion based art.

That is the most retarded thing I've ever goddamn read, and I just finished reading a Wing Chun thread.


Kayne: A few Judo schools will practice atemi waza, but they tend to be of the less sporty, more "traditional" variety. It is part of the curriculum, like kata. Most sporty places won't do much or any kata either (except Randori No Kata for Shodan). A few traditionalists will also do the atemi as part of the warmup. Or they have Judo at one time and "jujutsu" (Judo with strikes and self-defense applications) another.

In general you are correct: most places don't practice atemi. And, regardless, traditional Judo atemi sucks.

Woo! Useful answer! What is it about judo atemi that blows? I have actually never seen it demonstrated, and can't find anything online that even shows the kinds of strikes.

Res Judicata
10/12/2006 10:18pm,
Re: Judo atemi

It's . . . eh. Take a look at this thread. http://judoforum.com/index.php?showtopic=13100&hl=atemi In there, there's a link to an italian website with images of Judo atemi. http://www.infojudo.com/atemi_waza/elenco_atemi_waza.htm I don't read Italian, but if you click the links you can see, e.g., suri age. MT it's not.