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PizDoff
2/22/2006 10:01pm,
Martial arts teacher pleads not guilty to fondling
By DAN HAUGEN
[email protected]

Article Published: 02/22/06, 1:17 pm
A Sioux Falls martial arts school instructor pleaded not guilty this morning to a charge he fondled a 13-year-old student.

Bud Williams, 46, taught tae kwon do for more than a decade at Self Defense America.

The student was spending the night at Williams’ house on Nov. 11 because she planned to get a ride to a tournament the next day in the Twin Cities, according to an arrest warrant affidavit.

The student slept on a couch and told police that she was awakened by Williams rubbing her breasts through her sweatshirt. When she moved, the instructor fled the house, she said.

Police said Williams confessed to touching the student and said it was a “stupid act.”

A pre-trial hearing was tentatively set for April 26.

http://www.argusleader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=200660222014

Sickening.

PizDoff
2/22/2006 10:03pm,
02/22/2006
Tae Kwon Do Instructor Pleads Not-Guilty
46-year-old Bud Williams was arraigned today for allegedly fondling one of his students.

He pleaded not-guilty to the felony charge, which could send him to prison for up-to 15 years.

Williams is accused of rubbing the breasts of a 13-year-old student last November as she slept on his couch the night before a Tae Kwon Do tournament in Minneapolis. His wife, KC Estes-Williams is also the owner of the Tae Kwon Do School and was already at the tournament, says she was expecting her husband and the girl to drive there the next morning.

Estes-Williams, who was in court supporting her husband, says the girl made up the story.
KELOLAND News spoke with her on the phone shortly after Williams was arrested.

“She had spent the night at our house a number of times, not just before tournaments but as a friend of our daughter,” Estes-Williams said.

The family of the alleged victim was in court, listening and watching.

When we spoke with the mother three weeks ago, she shared how this ordeal has been hard on her daughter and the whole family.

“After that happened, I think it took away a lot of sense of security we had,” the mother said. “I worked days and my husband worked evenings, and it bothered us so much that my husband did quit his job.”

Today the mother told KELOLAND News that her daughter is still very upset. The family is trying to take her to a counselor, but the girl says she's still not ready.

There have been no other victims in this case so far. Williams's trial is scheduled for May.
http://www.keloland.com/News/NewsDetail5440.cfm?Id=0,46222

PizDoff
2/22/2006 10:28pm,
Young martial arts expert already has own school

Dana M. Nichols
Record Staff Writer
Published Saturday, Feb 18, 2006

MOUNTAIN RANCH - Pierre Joubert is 16. His driver's license doesn't yet allow him to carry another youngster as a passenger.

Yet the black belt wrapped around his waist on a recent Wednesday night allows him to lead people half his age on a journey more profound than any car trip - teaching them shou shu, a form of kung fu. The proof of his power is the respect and love in the eyes of the six students punching and kicking under his direction at the Mountain Ranch Community Center.

"He's a very good teacher. He taught us a lot," said Nick Stewart, 12.

It was just three months ago that Joubert started his kung fu school under the supervision of the masters at Moore's Karate in Burson. Traditionally, shou shu masters don't even grant a person a black belt and the permission to teach independently until he is at least 18.

News of Joubert and his class has been spreading by word of mouth through Mountain Ranch.

"We heard about Pierre and how great he was," said Gen Stewart, Nick's mother. Her son Jimmy, 8, and daughter Courtney, 9, are also in Joubert's class. "Pierre not only teaches them martial arts, he teaches them how to respect it."

Sometimes that means pulling a student out of the ring and having a quiet one-on-one talk, as happened Wednesday, when one student began sparring wildly, kicking and punching without control.

"If you don't learn how to control yourself, I'll keep giving points to her," he warned at another point in the evening, after a student landed a sloppy punch on his female opponent.

Before the sparring, Joubert drilled the class in a series of kicks, grips and punches, sometimes stopping to guide a student's hand or foot in the proper motion.

Parents and even a few drop-in spectators watch from the back of the room.

"He spends a lot of time with them," said Richard Durham, whose grandsons Garrett Williams and Austin Williams are in the class. "If they don't get the moves, he goes over it again and again with them."

Joubert combines his stern warnings and methodical teaching with playfulness. He trains students in agility, for example, with a game in which they must dodge the punching mats he tosses at them and do push-ups when they get hit or bump into another student.

"My 12-year-old has a hero now. He found it in Pierre," Gen Williams said.

Running a martial arts school is just the latest turn in an already exceptional life. Joubert's mother moved her family to the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico, when he was 2. There, she worked as a bilingual administrator for a firm that built golf courses.

Joubert started school, becoming fully bilingual. At age 5, he started studying shotokan, a Japanese form of karate.

"He did international karate tournaments at the age of 9," said his mother, Margaret Paz.

By age 11, he had earned a black belt in shotokan.

When Joubert was 12, the family returned to California. He started brushing up on his English and studying shou shu, which he now prefers to shotokan.

The difference, say practitioners of shou shu, is that shotokan karate is a sport, primarily intended for sparring in tournaments. Shou shu is primarily for self-defense.

"It is a very practical art, a fighting art," Joubert said.

And Joubert is a practical boy. After he finishes his studies at Calaveras High School, he plans to attend a university and become a civil engineer. He's been working toward that goal for most of his life.

"He decided that in fourth grade," said his mother. "He asked, 'What's the difference between a civil engineer and an architectural engineer?' And he chose the civil engineer."
http://www.recordnet.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060218/NEWS01/602180345/1001

When I saw the headline I thought he'd be at least 18!

Matt Stone
2/22/2006 11:01pm,
Young martial arts expert already has own school

Oh, Christ, not again...


Pierre Joubert is 16.

I wonder at what tender age our young adolescent began his rigorous training?


Moore's [i]Karate[/b] in Burson.

So his supervising "mastah" is a karate teacher?


Traditionally, shou shu masters don't even grant a person a black belt and the permission to teach independently until he is at least 18.

So, what? They had a car payment to make or something? What's with shortcutting the testing standards and letting a child have a black belt?


Sometimes that means pulling a student out of the ring and having a quiet one-on-one talk, as happened Wednesday, when one student began sparring wildly, kicking and punching without control.

Because, when I think of life guidance, I think "16 year old kid."




Which is probably how they parent, too... From the back of the room and at a distance...

[QUOTE["If they don't get the moves, he goes over it again and again with them."

Ha! "Moves!" I'm reminded of Bruce Lee Roy... "I don't even have a paintbrush!"


Joubert combines his stern warnings and methodical teaching with playfulness. He trains students in agility, for example, with a game in which they must dodge the punching mats he tosses at them and do push-ups when they get hit or bump into another student.

Where I'm from, we call that "dodgeball." Innovative...


Joubert started school, becoming fully bilingual. At age 5, he started studying shotokan, a Japanese form of karate.

Becoming bilingual when starting at age 2 isn't such a stretch... Becoming fully bilingual at 22 or 32, not that's impressive.


By age 11, he had earned a black belt in shotokan.

Well, now we know.


When Joubert was 12, the family returned to California. He started brushing up on his English and studying shou shu, which he now prefers to shotokan.

So he's got less than 4 years in "shou shu," or "hand techniques," and that makes him a teacher? At 16? Suuuuure...


The difference, say practitioners of shou shu, is that shotokan karate is a sport, primarily intended for sparring in tournaments. Shou shu is primarily for self-defense.

And a 16 year old is so well versed in the deadly arts of killing, crippling, and maiming other people in "self defense."


"It is a very practical art, a fighting art," Joubert said.

As compared to Shotokan, and his vast life experience.

Whatthefuckever... :violent1:

bad credit
2/23/2006 3:27am,
There was another thread on this recently here. I've been following this 'cause it happened in my town and I have friend's training in the same place but in a different art.

AikiZenDragon
2/23/2006 4:03am,
really sad...

Kungfoolss
2/23/2006 6:03am,
[i]02/22/2006
Tae Kwon Do Instructor Pleads Not-Guilty


Clearly, he's innocent. After all, this sort of thing tends to occur so infrequently in the martial arts. :surprised

Mjelva
2/23/2006 7:56am,
Obviously, he must have had teh real taekwondo.

PirateJon
2/23/2006 11:22am,
Can't be true about a TKD guy. They're all about no contact...

Mjelva
2/23/2006 2:55pm,
Can't be true about a TKD guy. They're all about no contact...
flawless victory!

Darkpaladin
2/23/2006 3:18pm,
And referee Kam Duk Kim deducts one point for improper fondling...

bad credit
2/23/2006 9:24pm,
So does this mean there's gonna be sport points molesting at the next Olympics?

Wounded Ronin
2/27/2006 6:06pm,
Apparently sloppy punches aren't bad because they might lack power or give the other person the chance to counter punch. Sloppy punches are bad because sensei gives points to the other person. How artificial.

Wounded Ronin
2/27/2006 6:12pm,
Sounds like something from a Japanese variety show.

Doctor X
2/27/2006 10:01pm,
I desperately need to study a system that will teach me how to avoid flying pads!

--J.D.

TehDeadlyDimMak
2/27/2006 10:06pm,
The fact that he started awarding "points" against one of the kids for not respecting her opponent is ridiculous. Point sparring teenager teaches lame martial arts to even younger kids.


Somebody DO SOMETHING. INTERVENE SOMEONE INTERVENE!