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View Full Version : On sale! Open your very own Karate club!!!!



Odacon
10/31/2005 6:03pm,
Think of opening your own Dojo? Whats the most important thing you'll need? Years of training? Are you kidding? All you need is this!!!!

http://cgi.ebay.com/KARATE-TRAINING-SCHOOL-MARTIAL-ARTS-BUSINESS-PLAN_W0QQitemZ7192436891QQcategoryZ16044QQrdZ1QQcm dZViewItem

Japuma630
10/31/2005 6:12pm,
It not accutaly that bad of a product.... Alot of MAist are not buisness men by nature so this just helps them get up and running.

Leonidas
10/31/2005 6:46pm,
I only skimmed it, but I dont see any mention that the business plan is to replace years of actual training, just to help them get off their feet or to consolidate the business. As an example, the guy I train under does construction work out of the dojo, so an entrepeneurial aid like this would be suitable. And because it only seems to focus on the busieness side of the venture, it's not gonna suddenly McDojo the place up.

At the same time, the fact that this company is looking at a MA place as a business venture does say something about why people are entering into teaching martial arts.

kikkoman
10/31/2005 7:49pm,
I can give the basic advice you need in a single post(for free). Start small. Even in your garage if you have to. I think that's how Rorion Gracie got started. If the school fails you won't lose as much. Let your school grow bigger on it's own. You can switch to a bigger building later.

If you buy thousands of dollars in mats and sign a 1 year lease on a building before you have any students, that's risky.

Odacon
11/01/2005 2:43pm,
If your looking to make money from martial arts (besides professional fighting) then your in it for the wrong reasons IMO.

Poop Loops
11/01/2005 2:48pm,
If your looking to make money from martial arts (besides professional fighting) then your in it for the wrong reasons IMO.

Bullshit.

Take someone who's been fighting professionally, add retirement and 20 years, and what do you get? Someone who pretty much only knows how to fight. Now, would YOU rather work at McDonald's for shitty pay? Or get a bit more pay but also do something you love? My BJJ instructor recently went full time into BJJ. Gives out private lessons, lots of classes, etc. He wants to live off of it. He loves doing it and is good at it. So what's wrong with it?

It's only when people care more about money than the students that it becomes a problem. As in, "little Jimmy is doing alright... but if I can get $100 more off of him, I'll promote him."

PL

Odacon
11/01/2005 3:09pm,
Bullshit.

Take someone who's been fighting professionally, add retirement and 20 years, and what do you get? Someone who pretty much only knows how to fight. Now, would YOU rather work at McDonald's for shitty pay? Or get a bit more pay but also do something you love? My BJJ instructor recently went full time into BJJ. Gives out private lessons, lots of classes, etc. He wants to live off of it. He loves doing it and is good at it. So what's wrong with it?

It's only when people care more about money than the students that it becomes a problem. As in, "little Jimmy is doing alright... but if I can get $100 more off of him, I'll promote him."

Agreed, but lets be realistic, which do you think is more common, your first or second example?

OZZ
11/01/2005 3:12pm,
If you are going to open up a martial arts club/school you need to ask yourself the following questions:
Am I qualified to teach?
WHY do I want to teach?
Who do I want to teach?Would I rather grind out quality students and weed out the inept and the undisciplined. Or am I only thinking about numbers and not neccessarily quality of students?

In this day and age it is way too easy to open up your own school. As far as I am concerned, you don't have the right to open your own school unless you have at least 10-15 years in. By 'in' I mean hard training and earned respect from a real teacher who will vouch for you.
If you don't have this, you have nothing.

dc725
11/02/2005 1:56am,
If you are going to open up a martial arts club/school you need to ask yourself the following questions:
Am I qualified to teach?
WHY do I want to teach?
Who do I want to teach?Would I rather grind out quality students and weed out the inept and the undisciplined. Or am I only thinking about numbers and not neccessarily quality of students?

In this day and age it is way too easy to open up your own school. As far as I am concerned, you don't have the right to open your own school unless you have at least 10-15 years in. By 'in' I mean hard training and earned respect from a real teacher who will vouch for you.
If you don't have this, you have nothing.
This is exactly it. This is why we have McDojos. I've seen some great technicians who have a two or three years under their belt, but they don't have the experience or the understanding to really be able to teach with any depth.

Qualified instructors should be able to make a living. I feel that the best way is for that instructor to have a business manager who does all the business end of the stuff so the instructor can do what he does best -- teach. Then the instructor is not equating students to dollars......But the instructor has to control the marketing person so that things stay in balance. Marketing people will always push the limits.

Bugeisha
11/02/2005 2:12am,
Marketing people will always push the limits.

Yes. Marketing is an evil stain on the unsullied virtue of the martial arts.

Poop Loops
11/02/2005 2:13am,
Agreed, but lets be realistic, which do you think is more common, your first or second example?

Let's be realistic: what you said was total bullshit. You're throwing away the baby with the bath water. It's not like NOBODY EVER opens a school without thinking "boy, I'll get to rape people's wallets!" especially now that pro fighters are actually considered martial artists again, it's pretty much their only source of income. You're going to deny them that, because other people can't control their greed?

PL

Shinigami
11/02/2005 2:15am,
While its true that not many martial artists worth anything are any good with business, it's also true that not many business men are worth crap in martial arts. Hence, the McDojo plague. Flashy stuff properly advertised to take your money.

This is why the GOOD dojos are shoved back to some backass part of town, stuck renting out a room in a ballet school. Business men and their McDojos no how to advertise and snag prime spots.

Cakemaster
11/02/2005 5:07am,
Not all good dojos are stuck there. My Kyokushin dojo is in a highly accessible community centre, you've got Straight Blast Gyms (ok, not a traditional dojo but hey, bear with me) over there that are very well publicised; those are but two examples. If I didn't have to go to work in 10, I'm sure I could find more. However, your point on advertising and swindling is not lost on me.

Leonidas
11/02/2005 5:13am,
Upon reconsideration, im thinkin its a good tool, provided all youre using it for is to maintain economic stability rather than make a substantial profit from the school.