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afronaut
8/20/2005 5:03pm,
Why is it that when I'm hitting focus mitts, especially with my jab, I feel like I'm too far from the mitt when I hit it?

Do I need to take a bigger step when I jab? Or is it normal for it to be "just out of range" and I need to get used to the distance?

Remember, I'm new to boxing and with judo, anything more than like 8 inches away might as well be a mile.

feedback
8/20/2005 9:01pm,
Why is it that when I'm hitting focus mitts, especially with my jab, I feel like I'm too far from the mitt when I hit it?

Do I need to take a bigger step when I jab? Or is it normal for it to be "just out of range" and I need to get used to the distance?

Remember, I'm new to boxing and with judo, anything more than like 8 inches away might as well be a mile.

Well, it might not be you in the first place, your holder could be shitty. They should meet your punches half-way.

But about your distancing; it depends. The jab can be thrown from almost any position, whether you're stepping forward, back, left, right, or stationary. It depends on the situation. It's up to you to decide how you're doing to position yourself for punching when doing mitts.

Oh, and you should be hitting the mitts for a 1-2 just before your arm locks out, no further.

afronaut
8/21/2005 10:47pm,
Related question: I am often reminded to take a step when jabbing, yet I rarely see anyone else (experienced or otherwise) do it when unsupervised.

Step w/ a jab -- yes or no?

Bang!
8/21/2005 10:53pm,
A really common mistake for beginner strikers is to have their force peak/terminate right around the surface of their target. Sometimes this results from the desperate desire to hit the target as soon as possible (power be damned) and sometimes it results from a simple lack of experience when it comes to hitting things.

As far as stepping and jabbing goes . . . I'm not a boxer by any means, but my thinking is that if you're jabbing, you're moving somewhere -- either in or away.

feedback
8/22/2005 3:47am,
Related question: I am often reminded to take a step when jabbing, yet I rarely see anyone else (experienced or otherwise) do it when unsupervised.

Step w/ a jab -- yes or no?

Depends. (: I'm sure that was the answer you were looking for!

lawdog
8/22/2005 7:30am,
Related question: I am often reminded to take a step when jabbing, yet I rarely see anyone else (experienced or otherwise) do it when unsupervised.

Step w/ a jab -- yes or no?
That's typically how the fundamentals are taught to beginners.

As for both of your questions, remember, reach is very important in boxing. That's why the "tale of the tape" lists the fighter's reach. If you can remain outside the reach of your opponent, it will be much harder for him to hit you.

Boxers are trained to strike from different ranges, but the fundamentals usually involve moving in, striking, and moving out. The reason you're being taught to take that step is that theoretically, you should be standing outside the reach of your opponent, so in order to hit him, you'll need to step in with the jab.

It's also to derive more power from your legs and hips.

Eventually you'll be taught to step in with the jab, throw a combo, then step out with the jab.

alex
8/22/2005 8:17am,
if people in your gym arent stepping with their jab, well, they suck. doesnt mean YOU shouldnt.

you gotta have an opener especially against a taller guy. a lot of people will get into the trap of staying within their range for fighting and not realising that when they step out of that range to collect themselves or whatever they are still within reach of the taller guy. and they get smoked.

try this. before you start a round of padwork, both guys stick their lead arm out so that your and his arms are fully extended and touching. this is your range. when you step forward with your jab you are stepping into that range to throw punches. after your combination you step out back to arms length. if you have to do it a few times throughout the round. standing still and jabbing is a **** idea that will get you ktfo.

afronaut
8/22/2005 10:10am,
I get busted on for bobbing my hands slightly when I move in to punch, as I am telegraphing. So it would seem that a step of several inches would be a huge tell that "Hey! Dude! The punching is about to commence! Please side-step and punch my liver into the neighboring zip code."

patfromlogan
8/22/2005 10:20am,
I get busted on for bobbing my hands slightly when I move in to punch, as I am telegraphing.
Any telegraphing is a no no. People often hitch up or tuck a certain way before kicks for instance. Practice in the mirror at home flicking jabs. As fast as you can with good form, then go faster. After a couple months you'll be real fast. Try to go fast enough that it's hard to see your hands.


So it would seem that a step of several inches would be a huge tell that "Hey! Dude! The punching is about to commence! Please side-step and punch my liver into the neighboring zip code."
In KK we were taught that the strike "hides" the step. The basic move was "six inch" step (really could be anything) with fast jab, then back. More advanced drills might be step/jab, left snap kick, right cross then right front kick. Basic pad drill is pretty stationary, I noticed the Kempo instructor in Hawaii kept moving in/out/around me, even driving in toward me while we were doing punching pad drills. That takes more practice.

lawdog
8/22/2005 10:59am,
I get busted on for bobbing my hands slightly when I move in to punch, as I am telegraphing. So it would seem that a step of several inches would be a huge tell that "Hey! Dude! The punching is about to commence! Please side-step and punch my liver into the neighboring zip code."
No, because the step isn't prior to the jab, it's simultaneous. The step should not be telegraphing any more than the jab itself.

Pat's right about telegraphing, it's a huge no, no, and the mirror is a great way to correct it. It will be a lot easier for you to correct that habit now rather than later, so you're lucky you have a trainer who's pointing it out for you.

beachfront71
8/22/2005 11:01am,
Remeber as well that your power in punches and kicks is not where your fist or foot stops, it is actually right before that zone which is why you are told to punch/ kick through a target.

If your jab stops right where you hit the mitts, you are out of range and must accomodate (ie step), you are also in an area where if the holder moves back at all and does not meet you, you can throw out your elbow by missing completley.

I was always told that if stepping for a jab, your arm should actually be moving before your foot to eliminate telegraphing.

Your power should be coming from your back leg anyways so the step with the front leg is not doing much, it is the push from the back foot that creates the distance and power.

Comments?

daGorilla
8/22/2005 11:31am,
I get busted on for bobbing my hands slightly when I move in to punch, as I am telegraphing. So it would seem that a step of several inches would be a huge tell that "Hey! Dude! The punching is about to commence! Please side-step and punch my liver into the neighboring zip code."

So Afronaut -- do you "have a spine" now?

Or did your state of spinelessness simply demand fighting on your feet more? :)

Hope the spine is fine! (or will be)

-daGorilla

afronaut
8/22/2005 11:40am,
More or less, my spine I mean. No more picking people up. Hitting things is fine. I assume this means being hit is fine too.

lawdog
8/22/2005 12:41pm,
More or less, my spine I mean. No more picking people up. Hitting things is fine. I assume this means being hit is fine too.
I hope the twisting doesn't give you any problems. The twisting motion involved in punching is usually a big no no when a disc is herniated.

Then again, so are a lot of things that I found to be beneficial.

antman
8/22/2005 1:12pm,
Is your partner moving or not when he is holding the mits if he is moving uyou will have to cover the distance which is good work for your distnace and timing of when to throw your punch. If he's not moving well then you are set up to far away. Also he should be slapping the mitt a little forward during contact.

alex
8/22/2005 3:23pm,
if you have a better way of getting into range im all ears. like was said you throw the jab while moving, follow up, back out while throwing another jab-