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Hannibal
6/28/2005 6:44am,
Now this question goes out to those that train in 2 or more than one martial art at the one time. Is it beneficial ?

I recently had a discussion with a friend of mine who trains in Kyokushin with me. I mentioned that I would be interested in training in Judo aswell. Don't get me wrong - I love Kyokushin, its great. But its a striking art. I've come to understand grappling is simply too important to ignore. Sadly there is no BJJ near me but there is a good Judo school near by. Not too far away at all. My freind mentioned to me that, and I quote " To do two styles at once is a waste of both of them".

Do you guys think that is true ? I cannot see how it is. If anything a liitle diversion and change is a healthy thing.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
6/28/2005 6:54am,
What? Training in two styles at once? Whoever heard of that? What a ridiculous idea!

Is this a qualified instructor friend, or stupid drunk type friend?

Hannibal
6/28/2005 7:01am,
No it was not my instructor.

Just a friend who I have met at Kyokushin. He is actually quite a capable fighter. But he believes it is wise to pick a martial art. Train hard and focus on that, then move onto the next. He stated that by learining 2 arts at once you just trip yourself up. Just though I seek other peoples opinions on this.

MrMcFu
6/28/2005 7:03am,
You ask some painfully obvious questions Hannibal.



Kyohushkai + Judo = Good

TehDeadlyDimMak
6/28/2005 7:06am,
It's called crosstraining and yes its beneficial if done right.

Ronin
6/28/2005 7:07am,
IF you have the time and IF you have the energy level and IF you choose 2 systems that are opposits, in this case a striking art and a grappling art which always go great together, than training 2 different systems at the same time is ok.

I always did.

Now, some gyms that are MMA oriented will train that to begin with, NOT different systems, but put everything together.
The jury is still out on wither that is "better" than training in specialised systems and THEN mixing them.

So...

Matsufubu
6/28/2005 7:11am,
Yes, cross training is good. Duh.

The problem I have with the ''learn one art and move onto the next'' is that unless you're the soke/grandmaster/whatever, you HAVEN'T learnt that art. Also, how can you stay sharp and have good grappling skills if you haven't trained in judo for ten years because you figure you'd learnt it all and moved on? It's like spending a year at the gym and giving it up because you're strong enough already. Just doesn't work.

I do see the guy's point, but as long as you are committed to getting good at both, then of course crosstraining is good.

ArmchairNinja
6/28/2005 7:17am,
I guess it depends on what you're looking from training. Many karate styles are notorious for the endless tweaking of trivial details to make it look exactly like the soke does it. If that's your thing then maybe it's best not to confuse it with other arts. From a practical standpoint however, it's fairly obvious that grappling + striking is better than either one alone. If your time permits it, you should learn both.

Personally I do karate and bjj and find that they complement eachother really well. I had already hit that certain plateau in my karate training when I started with bjj, so basically I'm just exchanging the trivial tweaking part to not-so-trivial grappling.

daimyo
6/28/2005 7:37am,
I think it's perfectly fine to study kyokushin and judo at the same time. They're different enough that you wouldn't be mixing up info from one or the other. It's better than say studying goju and shotokan, where you'd have to watch where you're chambering your hand etc.

Nid
6/28/2005 7:41am,
Criminey, Hannibal.

I'm starting to think you're JUST clever enough to get around the V-chip on your computer.

Kind of like when Ricky watched porn on his dad's TV, in that one episode of Silver Spoons.

Chupacabra
6/28/2005 7:47am,
mixing martial arts is like a broken language

Ronin
6/28/2005 7:52am,
mixing martial arts is like a broken language


Well, like I said, the jury is still out.
On one hand, the learning curve is less, you are learnign to punch, kick, throw and grapple from day 1, on the other hand, its debatable wether you are getting the quality instruction that you would get from a "specialised" school.

We will see what the future holds...

Chupacabra
6/28/2005 7:56am,
Well, like I said, the jury is still out.
On one hand, the learning curve is less, you are learnign to punch, kick, throw and grapple from day 1, on the other hand, its debatable wether you are getting the quality instruction that you would get from a "specialised" school.

We will see what the future holds...

Nah man I'm telling you, the guy that manages one of the gyms my wife works at told me so. mixing martial arts is like speaking a broken language.

Ronin
6/28/2005 7:57am,
Nah man I'm telling you, the guy that manages one of the gyms my wife works at told me so. mixing martial arts is like speaking a broken language.


Well then, if someone told you, it must be true.

:qpepsi:

DCS
6/28/2005 7:58am,
You ask some painfully obvious questions Hannibal.



Kyohushkai + Judo = Good


Kyokushin + Judo = Daido Juku (better than good)

Ainttappin
6/28/2005 8:37am,
Well then, if someone told you, it must be true.

:qpepsi:

I attend three different schools and have four different teachers.

1.) I attend a MMA school (teaches the standard MT, BJJ, Wrestling and boxing).
2.) I attend a boxing gym
3.) At the boxing gym they have BJJ classes.
4.) Everynow and then I go to a TKD/Kung Fu school.

I've been doing this for about three months and my game in MMA has really improved by doing this but this could also be because I spend about 12-16 hours per week doing martial arts that contain a lot I mean A LOT of sparring. But when I go to the TKD/Kung Fu school...I really suck at forms..but it's OK cause I can beat everyone down : )