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Cullion
5/23/2005 4:04am,
I understand from my lurking that Karate is often considered suspect, with Kyokushin being a notable exception. I'm interested to hear what people think of Goju Ryu/Goju Kai in terms in realistic/hard sparring and physical conditioning.

I know that the particular club one trains at is more important, but styles do have overall 'cultures' or reputations to them, so what's Goju's ?

Anthracis
5/23/2005 9:47am,
I have studied under Teruo Chinen and he had us sparring semi/full contact (no blows to the face, groin, etc...). He would hit us while we did forms. Very good training. Again, it is where and with whom you train. There are good and bad schools/instructors with every style. You need to find out what your goals are and what the philosophy and training methods of the potential school are and make your decision accordingly.

-OUT

Cullion
5/23/2005 11:16am,
Thanks for that. Sounds good. My goal is to get a hard fitness workout and develop my standup. I'm looking at Goju because there is no full-contact kickboxing near me, and no MT or Kyokushin at all. The local amateur boxing club said I was too old at 30! (still, they are a student club, and are looking for serious competitors. I think 30 is the upper limit to get an amateur licence in the UK).

pauli
5/23/2005 11:20am,
i've trained (briefly) with a goju blackbelt from the uk. seemed to really know his ****. we didn't do any sparring, but i did learn (and subsequently forget) a nifty elbow strike kata.

where are you in the uk?

a43
5/23/2005 11:38am,
Thanks for that. Sounds good. My goal is to get a hard fitness workout and develop my standup. I'm looking at Goju because there is no full-contact kickboxing near me, and no MT or Kyokushin at all. The local amateur boxing club said I was too old at 30! (still, they are a student club, and are looking for serious competitors. I think 30 is the upper limit to get an amateur licence in the UK).

If you can't find MT or Kyokushin, you might want to research one of the Kyokushin spinoffs, which include Ashihara, Enshin, Seidokaikan (to avoid confusion with other Seido* syles they are now known as Shodokaikan outside of japan. There are probably dojos who still use the old name though), World Oyama Karate, World Seido Karate and Shidokan. To my knowledge, these styles all still practice full contact practical fighting, with Ashihara and Enshin favouring circular evasive motions rather than straight on blocking. They were also all formed by very respected and successful Shihans in Kyokushin and aren't just some random ex-Kyokushin practicioner that decided to open up his own business.

I've heard that Shidokan uses a peculiar but interesting ruleset where round 1 is fought under knockdown karate rules, round 2 is Muay Thai rules, and round 3 no holds barred, including grappling.

Cullion
5/23/2005 12:15pm,
Those alternatives all sound good. But a google search turns up none. I'm in Oxford in the UK.

Jekyll
5/23/2005 12:54pm,
It looks like they do semi-contact in oxford and the grappling sounds co-operative.
http://www.oxfordkarateacademy.com/training/training_kumite1.html


Kumite is the fighting side of karate. In the dojo, controlled sparring is practised, using the techniques learnt in basics and Kata.

Goju-Ryu favours a closer range of fighting as a system utilising circular techniques and tai sabaki (body evasion) movements and groin kicks. The style of sparring in Goju is very much aimed towards practical self-defence techniques, rather than sports fighting. High kicks are rarely employed, as in a real world scenario these would not be practical.

As the practitioner progresses he will be taught a variety of techniques including wrist locks, arm locks and throwing techniques (nage waza). These techniques, when incorporated with blocks, kicks and hand strikes form a thorough system of self-defence.

VikingPower
5/23/2005 4:26pm,
I trained in Meibukan Goju-Ryu for a while under one of my sergeants who was a black belt under Sensei Ikemiyagi. It definitely had its plus sides. During a two-hour class, the first hour would be devoted to nothing but body hardening (three-star striking for forearms, shin on shin contact, and leg kicks to toughen up your thighs). Some kumite, but most of the time it was just kata. Add in some sparring with that though and you'd be a tough customer.

KickAHippie
5/23/2005 4:59pm,
I work with a guy that does goju. They do some board breaking and **** like that but also have one day a week where they spar. They also have judo style throws and ground work. One thing he told me about their katas is that they actually will perform them with a resisting partner after they have perfected them. I don't exactly understand how they do this but I have a pretty good idea. Anyway it sounds better than standing in the middle of a room watching youself punching air in a mirror.

Zeddy
5/24/2005 8:10am,
I'll just throw in a warning. In Australia, one of the largest goju clubs, Go Kan Ryu is a full blown mcdojo. It's non contact, the physical conditioning is limited largely to cardio.

As always, it depends on the individual schools, not always the style.

patfromlogan
5/24/2005 10:33am,
Even in some schools where the training is not all you'd wish there are often people (yours truly) who are more than willing to get it on. In my school there isn't much wrestling, but after class people often spar or roll.

That " body hardening" stuff is controversial, and I did hate getting causually bruised by bb's who seemd to think I was a big wimp in KK (how do they just smack away like that I never really got), but those who practice it achieve a toughness, I must admit.

Ronin
5/24/2005 11:53am,
The Goju-kai, TYPICALLY is less "hardcore" than the dojo's that are Okinawan Goju.

But the quality varies SO much from dojo to dojo that, there is no set standard fro "intensity".

seeker of truth
5/24/2005 9:31pm,
I'm training in whats called a back yard dojo. My sensei is Nidan but she trained with KOshin Iha in the Jundokan. Losts of emphasis on kata and bunkai, lots of sparring and grappling. Makiwara and Chisi are essential, some training on kicks, but more so sweeps, take downs and strikes.

Ronin
5/25/2005 6:43am,
I'm training in whats called a back yard dojo. My sensei is Nidan but she trained with KOshin Iha in the Jundokan. Losts of emphasis on kata and bunkai, lots of sparring and grappling. Makiwara and Chisi are essential, some training on kicks, but more so sweeps, take downs and strikes.


Where in Ontario?
Your style is listed as Tai Chi Chaun ( grand ultimate fist)...

seeker of truth
5/25/2005 3:08pm,
My style is listed as tai chi chuan cause that was what I had been studying longest, I am no longer studying it and am now studying Goju. I live up by Mattawa.