PDA

View Full Version : catching punches



Pages : [1] 2 3

TheHungsta
4/08/2005 2:50pm,
Is there any disadvantage to simply catching punches in the palm of your hand as opposed to slipping/parrying them? I've noticed that catching punches is much easier and doesn't take as much effort and it seems just as effective.

jasonB
4/08/2005 3:04pm,
By "catch" do you mean 'blocking with the palm of the hand' or 'snatching the incoming fist right out of the air'? 'Cause the latter sounds real hard to do against anything other than a lunge punch.

Jason

TheHungsta
4/08/2005 3:04pm,
I meant just letting it hit the palm of your hand. Not actually grabbing it.

Matt Bernius
4/08/2005 3:06pm,
my big concern with catching comes from practicing a weapons based art. There is always the possibility that, in an unstructured confrontation, the palm has something in it. The last thing you want is to accidently get a bottle/knife buried in your palm. So I tend to avoid it where possible.

For MMA/Ring application, well I leave that to folks who know a heck of a lot more that I do.

- Matt

ojgsxr6
4/08/2005 3:07pm,
I think it would hurt if you tried to do it with your bare hands, but I've only ever tried it 16oz gloves and a jab. In my opinion the parry is the way to go, but slipping is way more demoralizing

Omega Supreme
4/08/2005 3:19pm,
I wouldn't say a advantage over preferance. I personally like to catch the fist but it prevents me from going on the offensive. I personally think it's a psychological thing with me but I tend not to counter with punches when I go to this type of evasive mode. I use this technique usually when I want to drag out the match and where the guy down.....

Omega Supreme
4/08/2005 3:20pm,
my big concern with catching comes from practicing a weapons based art. There is always the possibility that, in an unstructured confrontation, the palm has something in it. The last thing you want is to accidently get a bottle/knife buried in your palm. So I tend to avoid it where possible.

For MMA/Ring application, well I leave that to folks who know a heck of a lot more that I do.

- Matt


Yes blocking a knife be dumb. Blocking a bullet is fine though. :qright3:

MattJ
4/08/2005 3:24pm,
My friends and I have done a fair amount of bare knuckled sparring (med-full to the body, light to the face - I bruise like a grape!), and while we obviously try to slip as much as humanly motherfuckin' possible, sometimes it's easier to catch that jab that anything else.

While I wouldn't want to catch jabs barehanded for 12 rounds, it actually doesn't hurt as bad as you might think. Most of the time you see it coming, so you can start moving your hand to take some of the shock off it. Don't reach for it, though. That will sting like a SOB.

Mr. Mantis
4/08/2005 3:35pm,
Never caught a punch before, but have blocked/slipped and grabbed an arm to then pull into a punch. This is a common technique in mantis and white eyebrow.

Matt Bernius
4/08/2005 3:40pm,
Yes blocking a knife be dumb. Blocking a bullet is fine though. :qright3:Actually, there are four options there:

1. Parry the bullet.
This is probably the most basic techinque. I'm told it's timing base. Preferably one should be in a __in __un stance. Shift as the gun is fired and either set up an Tan Sau which the bullet will have to go around or simply pat it to the outside of your body.

2. Catch the bullet.
Once you've passed the first step, the next thing it to learn to catch the bullet. It's a little tougher. Especially for those hard core guys, like in the Last Dragon, who can do it with their teeth.

3. Chop the bullet in two
Judo chops are usually the best. In a case like this, you begin as you do in the first scenario. Shift out of the way, but instead of parrying, just chop the sucker and split it into two. Hand conditioning is required to do this right. I suggest by conditioning your hands with heat first. Holding them over a burner... better yet on a stove burning is a good idea. I'm sure Omega and others have better ones.

4. Do a crazy aikido esq blend/spin and throw/guide the bullet back at the person firing the gun catching them right between the eyes (or "shooting the gun out of thier hand as a valid other option).
-- I think that one describes itself.

Of course your could choose the BJJ option and just throw a flying arm bar on the bullet. Did I miss any others?

- Matt
(patiently awaiting the pain about to come his way)

MattJ
4/08/2005 4:14pm,
Matt Bernius -

You totally forgot about bullet time, a la the Matrix.

You amateur!! :XXbuzzsaw

Omar
4/08/2005 7:18pm,
I learned in MT to pretty much catch all counterpunches to my face that way. Not to really parry them. It fits in with the way we always throw the arm back for the kicks. That leaves you open to getting clocked in the jaw as you kick. So we..I bring the other hand up to guard. No need to slap it out of the way. Just concentrate on landing that kick. You just get used to throwing that palm up there weather he coutners or not. Same thing for jabs. We'd typically slip the head to the right a bit and forward on the jab while bringing the right hand up to the face. I spent a lot of time drilling this with people where we'd both just kind of do "jab sparring". Only jabs, double jabs and more jabs. But the catch was, whenever the other guy jabs, you are supposed to jab right back at him simultaneaously. So both people get used to the idead that every single jab will be met with another jab to their face. Then you end learn to catch that jab instinctively AND you learn to NOT let the other guy finish his combo.

But then we'd also do something similar to this with the 1-2 combo.

We both jab.
I jab and YOU throw a 1-2 where I have to catch the '2'. That means a combination of a slight lean back or to the side. Either way, it teaches tou how to block face shots by "catching" them with the rear hand.

daimyo
4/08/2005 9:59pm,
I prefer slipping/parrying/etc as opposed to 'catching' only because it leaves and extra hand free to quickly counter attack. I usually weave and get in close for a body shot, with the extra momentum I'm sure the punch hurts a lil more. ;) I also wouldn't want to risk injuring my wrist if I catch the punch the little too low, say on my fingers instead of palm.

Gypsy Jazz
4/08/2005 11:52pm,
Currently in kickboxing the only defense I have learned for straight punches is to catch them. I've never really liked the idea of letting some one punch my hand, but with the gloves on it doesn't hurt at all. I find that you can "catch" with the flat of your forearm (palm faces you) just fine. I'd much rather absorb a hit in the arm than the hand.

Experience in shotokan + modified karate whatnot gives plenty of deflection/parrying blocks for straight punches. Unfortunately whenever I've tried this in sparring my partener has "corrected" me and told me to catch rather than "move my arm out". Just bad luck with parteners so far I suppose, maybe I'll give it another shot tomorrow.

Honor
4/09/2005 3:30am,
If it's slow enough for you to see it coming it's slow enough for you to counter effectively. Why catch when your opponent leaves himself wide open

Omega Supreme
4/09/2005 12:07pm,
If it's slow enough for you to see it coming it's slow enough for you to counter effectively. Why catch when your opponent leaves himself wide open


Hey Honor....You sure this is spelled correctly? Ansatsuken<<<<<