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DANINJA
3/02/2003 5:29pm,
here is an article on training for the street:

http://www.geoffthompson.com/articles/article_justin_training_for_reality.htm

"TextTraining for street confrontations is very intense and quite different from training for competitions, even the Extreme fighting competitions that seem to be very popular lately.

For the street we have to create training scenarios that will send the adrenals into overdrive. What Geoff Thompson created, to this end, was Animal day and Progressive sparring (any range allowed). Training for reality is essential if we are to stretch ourselves physically and mentally, and prepare for a real encounter.

This is not to say that training, other than reality training, does not have its benefits. Off course it does. We must alter our workouts to prepare for different arenas. For instance, when I trained for my Vale Tudo fights I concentrated more on ground fighting, as most extreme fighting ends up the floor. If floor fighting is what you are after then Vale Tudo type training is probably the nearest you can get.

People often feel that extreme fighting is as close to reality as you get. And it is quite close if you were preparing for a match fight, though it does lack basics such as biting and eye gouging. We include the former and the latter in our training. Whilst this may be controversial in some quarters, to us it is an essential part of preparing for an encounter where biting and gouging is not only allowed, it is in the job description.

In this sense, the pavement arena is an entirely different world to the Extreme fighting competitions. Also, street defence carries many consequences that the ring does not, police involvement, comebacks, killing, being killed etc. This is why we need justification as our ally before we enter into a street situation.

Where the street differs again is that ground fighting would not be the range of choice (not mine any way). Grappling can be dangerous outside because it is very unlikely in this range that you'll be able to deal with more than one person at a time. If your attacker has friends (he normally always will) there is a strong possibility that you'll be fighting them all (sometimes even people watching will join in). This could prove fatal, and only the inclusion of the aforementioned biting and gouging will save the day.

In today's society we have to depend more on the devastating art of Geoff Thompson's 3 Second Fighting than we do on grappling - though off course grappling is a great support system. Most situations are 3 second fights. This is where a fight starts with some kind of aggressive dialogue and progresses to a physical attack. In the 3 second fight the pre-emptive attack (attacking first) is the order of the day. In this arena you either hit first or you get hit. This is often the difference between winning and losing.

To train for the 3 second fight we predominantly work on pre-emptive strikes. This is where reality lies. We work with focus mitts for single, accurate strikes. The biggest punch will have no effect if it does not land on the target. We treat the focus pad like a real person, we talk to it and ask it a question before striking, (this is to engage the brain, the set up, or what Geoff and Peter Consterdine would call the action trigger).

We train only a few punches, but we train them to perfection so that under pressure the technique holds up. It is not about accumulating techniques, this can often create a log-jam. Instead we put all our effort into making a few techniques our own, so they become second nature in a pressure situation. The last thing we want is to find our self lacking when all that lies between us and a good beating is reliable, pressure tested technique.
As the Sumo say 'cry in training, laugh in the arena.

If you want to go down the reality path, you could do no better than investing in one of Geoff Thompson's book and videos. Practice the techniques, but don't become disillusioned if you don't get it right away, it takes time, all of life's battles lie in the mental sparring.

Text

So do guys do this kind of trainig?

Deadpan Scientist
3/02/2003 5:51pm,
Osiris: actually every fight I've been in has been one on one. One of the times the guy had 3 friends, but after they saw their buddy eat a facefull of fencepole they all ran away! My friends(3 all did san soo with me) didn't even bother to get up from eating lunch when that happened. I'm not sure if that was because they knew I could handle him, or they weren't very good friends!

LeungJan
3/02/2003 6:31pm,
This is clearly bullshit. If his friends jump in then so do mine. The bystanders should be no threat because as long as you dont get knocked down, youll be fine. How will eyegouging and biting save you from multiple attackers?


I think you need to find out who Geoff is. He speaks from brutal experience. Read his book Watch My Back. He truly, truly, knows his stuff, far more than perhaps anybody on these forums could ever hope to.

Fatality Dragon
3/02/2003 6:32pm,
Brand, may they just want to see some shows lol.

"I would rather admit I am a lousy student than say I am the best, because once you think you are the best, there is no reason to continue learning."

LeungJan
3/02/2003 6:46pm,
So? He's wrong now.


Thats what I mean about finding out about who he is. Geoff is the biggest advocate of learning how to fight on the ground that there is. Just because he says he prefers not to be there is not the same as saying ground fighting is BS. READ, and stop making up your own conclusions over one small article rather than doing any research,

Vargas
3/03/2003 12:14am,
To quote:

"We treat the focus pad like a real person, we talk to it and ask it a question before striking"

Now I've heard it all. So, does the focus pad answer back? What kind of questions would you ask a focus pad in the first place? Geoff may be a demigod in the partheon of self defense, but if he asked me to talk to a goddamn focus mitt, I'd laugh in his face and go find another trainer. Just because he's a great guy and knows a thing or two about fighting doesn't mean he can't, on occasion, be full of ****.

"Go cry about it Vargas. Aren't you late for your shift at McDonald's?"

Deadpan Scientist
3/03/2003 12:29am,
What's your sign?
*wham*
Who's your daddy?
*wham wham*
That's going to leave a mark!
*wham*

Greese
3/03/2003 1:36am,
I was hitting a heavy bag and turned around to talk to someone and it hit me. Does that count?

SLJ
3/03/2003 6:56am,
Geoff spent 9 years KOing people in nightclubs.

He advises you to use a pre-emptive strike, which is basically using dialog to take your opponents mind of the fact that you're going to belt him in the jaw, and then doing it.

He'll also tell you that if you miss, or the opponent realises what's going on and a match fight is on you, that you're going to the ground, and you better have the skills to deal with it.

He also doesn't stand for any flowery kung-fu bullshit, he sticks to simple techniques that work.

----------------------------------------------------------
Space may be the final frontier,
But it's made in a Hollywood basement.

Blad3
3/03/2003 9:40am,
Geoff thompson is one of the best self defence experts, but a lot of what he says and teaches isn't alway accurate (apparently when he started to teach armbars) and even he teaches grappling.

I don't think as much of him as I first dic though.

He train mostly bxoing by the looks of it..

SLJ
3/03/2003 10:09am,
Yer, he's mainly a puncher.

A lot of what he says about the pre-emtpive strike is very good.

The only problem I have with it (as I do with all striking) is that it relys on strength and power.



----------------------------------------------------------
Space may be the final frontier,
But it's made in a Hollywood basement.

PizDoff
3/03/2003 2:16pm,
"Almost every male knows what a real fight is like."
really? i doubt that, many males i know have no interest in fighting

"Osiris: actually every fight I've been in has been one on one."
most of my fights have been one on one

"He also doesn't stand for any flowery kung-fu bullshit,"
or what about TKD techniques that are useless?
thanks for your special bias


reading his site up now

--
I attack flurriously!
Let me introduce you to my friends: Hand, Elbow and Knee.

LeungJan
3/03/2003 5:44pm,
what I quoted him as being wrong. Standup wont save you either. Youll be tackled.


LOL! So you know the outcome of every fight that could happen? Only yesterday I was sat in a pub watching a full on brawl going on. Most amusing. They were going at it like they were posessed. Not one person tried a tackle, and not one person went to the ground. They were too busy wildly swinging their arms around. If you watch most untrained people this is what they do. For the most part those are the guys we train to defend against.

Besides, the most basic part of Geoffs strategy is a pre-empative strike. He knocks them out BEFORE they have even begun a physical attack. Dunno about the US, but here in the UK if the circumstances are right a pre-empative strike is perfectly legal. You'll have to defend yourself in court for the most part, but it is covered by law.

So, no more about 'all fights go to the ground' or 'you will be tackled'. You assume too much, and assumption is the way to rigidity and the road to coming unstuck. Nothing is set in stone.

LeungJan
3/03/2003 5:55pm,
Geoff thompson is one of the best self defence experts, but a lot of what he says and teaches isn't alway accurate (apparently when he started to teach armbars) and even he teaches grappling.

I don't think as much of him as I first dic though.

He train mostly bxoing by the looks of it..


Indeed. I am not a fan of his marketing etc. And I don't agree with everything he says. However he has been in more serious brawls than anybody here. He speaks from his own experience, of which it is pretty vast.

From what I can tell Geoff trains for power punching. One hit knockouts or stunners, but he also trains a lot on the ground. He has branched out a lot since he first started. Geoffs most important information comes from knowing how your average thugs mind works, and strategies used by such people.

In UFC people get taken to the ground. But from all the real fights I have witnessed normal people don't go for tackles that often. They may end up on the floor, but not intentionally. I often wonder, even with an experienced martial artist or MMA guy, if they really got angry at someone, would they fight with what they train in, or would all of that go out of the window? Just thinking out loud.

PizDoff
3/03/2003 5:57pm,
:)

--
I attack flurriously!
Let me introduce you to my friends: Hand, Elbow and Knee.

FingerorMoon?
3/03/2003 6:08pm,
'TextTraining' - isn't that what everyone here is doing ? :)

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