PDA

View Full Version : Is TKD a good art to choose if you're not at a McDojo?



Ninja_Monkey
1/27/2005 9:16pm,
I'm starting out in Martial Arts and I was leaning towards starting with TKD and Judo, both of which are done near me. TKD seems to have a bad rep though, is it a good art if its not a McDojo you're at?

I'd like an art which is predominantly striking, with lots of kicking techniques cos I'm not naturally a kicker, but also not neglecting the hands either. I'd like for it to include a variety of throws and not totally neglect the groundwork, but I chose Judo to cover those aspects of it, and because it looks fun and a good starting point.

I'd also like an art with a strong sense of culture, history and tradition which is what made TKD more attractive to me than Western Kickboxing. If I do an art I'm not gonna do it half-arsed, I'm gonna learn the history of how it came to be created, why it was created etc, because I find the traditions and principles behind the various MA's as fascinating as the techniques themselves.

I'd like for the arts I choose to not be overly reliant on Kata's, I don't mind doing them but I'd rather spend my time practicing the strikes and throws in actual sparring more often than in Kata's.

All of the arts I'm going to list I've checked into, and none of them are McDojo's, they're all reputable clubs.

I'm 6'2", 190lbs and pretty strong but my main strengths are my speed, agility, good balance and ridiculously high tolerance of pain.

The clubs I can choose from are: (With the bad points IMO in brackets)

Western Kickboxing (lacks interesting history and traditions)

Shotokan Karate (Low and impractical stances and overly reliant on Kata's)

Ju Jitsu (Too much groundwork)

Judo (Fun, good starting point and lots of throws)

TKD (Strike orientated, practical stances, less Kata's)

Kung Fu (I wasn't told which type of Kung Fu, are there any strike-orienteated ones?)

Tai Bo (Its not a real Martial Art)


So could anybody help me out a little, I'll go and sit in at a class of each, but any ideas as to which I would probably be most interested in?

Ninja_Monkey
1/27/2005 9:36pm,
Short but sweet lol, thanx :)

Phoenix
1/27/2005 9:39pm,
If you can avoid that political horseshit, then yes TKD is good. Especially the old school stuff.

But if I were you, I'd take up Western Kickboxing and/or Judo instead.

lifetime
1/27/2005 9:41pm,
I have no idea what Osiris just said, but TKD is a decent choice as long as you don't get stuck practicing ridiculous self-defence moves and poomse (patterns). Do a few weeks of TKD sparring, and you'll find out, VERY QUICKLY, that 70% of the kicks and patterns that you do have very little real application.

liuzg150181
1/27/2005 9:47pm,
What is your purpose of wanting to train MA in the first place?

Shuma-Gorath
1/27/2005 9:51pm,
Yes. The two top BJJ brown belts at our school came from exceptionally hardcore ITF and WTF TKD schools. The problem is that they are the exception, not the rule.

Phrost
1/27/2005 10:00pm,
Looking for a hardcore TKD school is like trying to land a spinning 540 kick: there's very little chance of it working out, but when it does, it's pretty cool.

infidel
1/27/2005 10:50pm,
Looking for a hardcore TKD school is like trying to land a spinning 540 kick: there's very little chance of it working out, but when it does, it's pretty cool.

nice :5emoticon

FighterJones
1/27/2005 11:00pm,
what Phrost said...
but take jiu jitsu.
groundwork is great.

PoleFighter
1/28/2005 3:43am,
Ninka_Monkey: I get the feeling that you've never trained before. Am I right? You say that you're interested in martial arts with strong culture and traditions, but take it from someone who spent a considerable time with very traditional arts: you will get so F*CKING tired of all that bullshit. "Traditional" usually only means that a) your instructor thinks he's about a million steps above you on the club's internal social ladder, b) that you have to learn to count in korean/japanese/mandarine when you do pushups and c) that the instructor refuses to acknowledge that there are other, better ways of doing things. Of course there might be exceptions, but that's my experience.

BTW I'm not a kick boxer, but I've gotten the impression that western kickboxing has a lot of kicks in it.

And what style of ju jutsu is it? Since you mention groundwork, it might be the brazillian variety. If it is; you should go try it. Most people who do enjoy it very much.

JohnnyCache
1/28/2005 3:44am,
I have no idea what Osiris just said,

"too long; didn't read"

TKD sounds like it might be a good choice in your limited area (I sympathize)
You might think about checking out the JJ class and seeing if it's more what you're looking for over the judo (if you're going to cross train judo/tkd). Just check out all your options (the good side of not having a bunch is you can sit in on them all inside of a week or two) and go with the better, harder classes - don't evaluate them based on their art's stereotype. Hell, if a couple of good champs have fought out of the kickboxing school, it might have more heart and tradition then you think...
Other things to look for: How often do they cancel class? How long have they been in business? Will they whip out a dumbass contract? (in other words, all the standard 'buyer beware' provisions that apply to other products apply to instruction)

Depth
1/28/2005 4:09am,
IF you are interested in learning self defense then please find a place that stressed practical application over "tradition", kicks that you'll never see in a bar fight, punches that have no power and stances that will get you laid out. -- this is TKD. I know, I did it for 6 years, but I was too young then to know better.

IF you are interested in going to a place that has a strong sense of discipline and is run in a military style (many TKD instructors are ex-korean military "champions") then you could probably find a TKD school with an instructor that would be more than happen to order you around (some people like that).

IF you like idea of being schooled in a tradition carries with it thousands of years of history and cultural sigificants, then perhaps you should try prostitution.

History is over-rated. By doing ANY form of MA, you are participating the evolving history of all MA's. Read a book about it if you want history.

I'm bias but ultimately is comes down to this: Do what you enjoy the most. If you could have any car in the world would you get the one a bunch of "experts" recommended? Of course not, you'd drive a few bad-ass vehicles and drive off with the one you fall in love with. It's no different with MA. Try some, one will feel right, and that's the right one for you, regardless of what anyone here says, including me.

afronaut
1/28/2005 9:51am,
I might counsel you not to make a n00b mistake that I am still making:

You have a lot of things on this list here. Many n00bs, again ME and I am still a n00b, approach learning martial arts like improve stats in a role playing or video game.

"I want to take judo for the throws, but BJJ for groundwerk, and some western boxing for my striking, but who has the best kicking? I've heard that the kicks in wing chun are ... "

If you are not naturally a gifted athlete or in great shape, all of the above skills will take a much longer time to learn that you might think. If you load up your menu with things to learn you will find them frustratingly slow to achieve, you'll be tempted to quit, etc. I'm there with you now, young brother.

Pray on this: Find whatever art or school you find FUN (overall, somedays you'll hate it, it will hurt, you'll feel like you suck), that is easy to get to that you can afford.

Worry about the rest later.

You'll get flamed here, but it's worth staying. You have the benevolent protection of the Order of the Afro.




I'm starting out in Martial Arts and I was leaning towards starting with TKD and Judo, both of which are done near me. TKD seems to have a bad rep though, is it a good art if its not a McDojo you're at?

I'd like an art which is predominantly striking, with lots of kicking techniques cos I'm not naturally a kicker, but also not neglecting the hands either. I'd like for it to include a variety of throws and not totally neglect the groundwork, but I chose Judo to cover those aspects of it, and because it looks fun and a good starting point.

I'd also like an art with a strong sense of culture, history and tradition which is what made TKD more attractive to me than Western Kickboxing. If I do an art I'm not gonna do it half-arsed, I'm gonna learn the history of how it came to be created, why it was created etc, because I find the traditions and principles behind the various MA's as fascinating as the techniques themselves.

I'd like for the arts I choose to not be overly reliant on Kata's, I don't mind doing them but I'd rather spend my time practicing the strikes and throws in actual sparring more often than in Kata's.

All of the arts I'm going to list I've checked into, and none of them are McDojo's, they're all reputable clubs.

I'm 6'2", 190lbs and pretty strong but my main strengths are my speed, agility, good balance and ridiculously high tolerance of pain.

The clubs I can choose from are: (With the bad points IMO in brackets)

Western Kickboxing (lacks interesting history and traditions)

Shotokan Karate (Low and impractical stances and overly reliant on Kata's)

Ju Jitsu (Too much groundwork)

Judo (Fun, good starting point and lots of throws)

TKD (Strike orientated, practical stances, less Kata's)

Kung Fu (I wasn't told which type of Kung Fu, are there any strike-orienteated ones?)

Tai Bo (Its not a real Martial Art)


So could anybody help me out a little, I'll go and sit in at a class of each, but any ideas as to which I would probably be most interested in?

Dio
1/28/2005 10:30am,
What Afronaut said.

The most important thing is feeling welcome and respected. Check out all the schools near you and see which ones appeal to you most. I do ITF Tae Kwon Do and my school is considered one of the "good" ones with quality instruction and good striking techniques that don't limit you by some absurd Olympic rules. It also feels like family in there, and that's the reason I've stayed with them for so long.

Forseti
1/28/2005 12:54pm,
What Afronaut said.

The most important thing is feeling welcome and respected. Check out all the schools near you and see which ones appeal to you most. I do ITF Tae Kwon Do and my school is considered one of the "good" ones with quality instruction and good striking techniques that don't limit you by some absurd Olympic rules. It also feels like family in there, and that's the reason I've stayed with them for so long.
This is really to the original poster...
I, too, took ITF Taekwondo about 15 years ago and have a very different impression of it (TKD) than people seem to express on bullshido. While I didn't then and don't now imagine it to necessarily be the ULTIMATE in fighting styles or some such thing, it seemed pretty solid and practical to me at the time. And, one of the more solid parts to it seemed to be the WTF style of sparring I did at AAU tournaments. You're talking boxing stances, mostly roundhouse and side kicks with punching inbetween -- that sort of thing. I will say that it didn't hold a candle to boxing as far as pure punching goes, but at the same time punching was essential to the contest.

Incidentally now I am interested in boxing, but I think that is really a lot more of a stylistic choice for me than a practical one.