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View Full Version : Shaolin comes back to INDIA! aka massive training disasters...



PizDoff
12/02/2004 1:11pm,
Shaolin Training in India



India News, New Delhi, Indians will get a chance to learn Shaolin Kung Fu, considered the mother of all martial arts, when the country's first Shaolin Temple opens there this month.

Simultaneous with the Nov 20 groundbreaking ceremony, classes will begin in a temporary shed at the site, said Kanishka Sharma, who claims to be the first Indian to have trained in the fifth century Shaolin Temple in China in May 2002.

"My masters, six of them, are coming from China and we will lay the foundation stone for India's first Shaolin Temple in New Delhi," Sharma, who teaches the art in different schools, told IANS.

The temple will be completed next year and will eventually award certificates of various categories.

Nestled in the beautiful foothills of Song Shan Mountains in China's Henan Province, the Shaolin Temple is regarded not only as the birthplace of martial arts but also Zen Buddhism, introduced by the Indian monk Damo in 517 A.D.

"I will create the same ambience as in the main Shaolin Temple and through this, I will create warriors of light (as Shaolin exponents are known)," said Sharma, who has been associated with TV shows on martial arts.

Among these is a documentary series titled "Seven Deadly Arts" with filmstar Akshay Kumar that aired on the National Geographic Channel. In it, Sharma taught Shaolin Kung Fu and Muay Thai (Thai kickboxing) to the film star spread over two episodes.

Sharma himself is trained in five other martial art forms apart from Shaolin Kung Fu, but finds this the toughest.

"I am trained in six different martial arts -- Karate, Jeet Kune Do (a form of Kung Fu created by the legendary Bruce Lee), Kung Fu Toa (an Iranian form of martial arts), Kalaripayattu (the martial art of Kerala) and Muay Thai.

"For me, all these martial arts are like a never-ending process. They are a way of life.

"Training in Shaolin was the toughest. To train seven hours every day was not an easy job. We had to run up a 1,200-metre mountain and then crawl back on our hands and knees in 20 minutes.

"A normal person will take at least 45 minutes to do this."

Sharma said: "We used to stay in the Mabu (horse-riding stance) for an hour every day, hit our heads, shoulders, forearms and fingers against six-feet long stone pillars.

"We also practised Chuans (Kung Fu forms), Sanda (Chinese kickboxing), candle punching and meditation.

"Martial arts is a process of attaining enlightenment by coordinating body, mind and spirit," affirmed the expert who left a plum job with the Reliance Group to learn martial arts.

Asked about the role of actors like Bruce Lee, Jet Li and Jackie Chan in popularising martial arts among the masses, Sharma retorted: "Bruce Lee and Jet Li, for me, do not represent Shaolin Kung Fu.

"These are people who have not spread the real beauty of martial arts, which is enlightenment.

"A martial art is a personality development programme where you gain enlightenment by coordinating your body, mind and spirit," asserted Sharma.


http://www.aboutshaolin.com/news_more.php?id=725_0_2_0_M
Heh, try copy and pasting from that site. :D


I don't think I really need to comment here.

Traditional Tom
12/04/2004 10:58am,
ahh the deadly candle punch attack... again, good find Pizd.

Bizzaro Root
12/04/2004 6:43pm,
how can she says shes the first east indian to train at the temple when it says in the same article that the guy who started buddhism was there 2000 years before her. notice they never say she practice sparring, not to mention crawlling on your hands in knees 1200 meters in 20 minutes in pretty rediculous.

Ignorant
12/05/2004 2:35am,
i think that the "warrior monk" image is just all around bad for buddhism. shakyamuni would role in his grave.

JKing
12/05/2004 2:45am,
how can she says shes the first east indian to train at the temple when it says in the same article that the guy who started buddhism was there 2000 years before her. notice they never say she practice sparring, not to mention crawlling on your hands in knees 1200 meters in 20 minutes in pretty rediculous.


You mean Bodhidharma (sp!!!) the guy who spread buddhism all over asia? I dont think he's included when they talk about people from india training in shaolin. As for sparring, (I dont now how many) but there are several that practice san shou. Also, note the styles she has under her belt. MT is credible enough for me. Dont be so negative.

PizDoff
12/05/2004 3:34am,
You know what? I went to a ninjitsu class, two of the top instructor guys there were Muay Thai (he claimed to have fights in Thailand and around the world) and a 3-year ex-BJJ guy.

What does this mean? People can get suckered into anything.



We had to run up a 1,200-metre mountain

Excellent!


and then crawl back on our hands and knees in 20 minutes.

Not excellent.


We used to stay in the Mabu (horse-riding stance) for an hour every day, hit our heads, shoulders, forearms and fingers against six-feet long stone pillars.

An hour seems rather unncessary to me, stance training is a needed part of the curriculum, but more important is the need to realise fighting is explosive and ever changing, not a static stance.

Don't see the significance in mentioning pillar size (because mine IS bigger than yours) but that is just for aesthetics. Also poor is the idea that striking such an object without give.