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PizDoff
12/02/2004 12:30pm,
Guess which one?!?!



Instructor's lifelong work culminates in Nashua tae kwon do school

NASHUA - Jinsub Chung practices a form of martial arts that dates back to 50 B.C. Edit: Which would be?

Tae kwon do, meaning “the way of the hand and foot,” is a modern martial arts form from Korea that is recognized by its fast, high and spinning kicks.

Chung has brought those kicks - honed by almost a lifetime of practice - to Main Street in Nashua, where he has opened Chung’s Tae Kwon Do Academy.

“It’s a good city to live in and it was voted one of the best cities in the United States,” Chung said about his choice of where to have a school. “And I like living in the Northeast.”

Chung was born in South Korea and started training in tae kwon do in an after-school program when he was 9 years old.

Chung was raised in the countryside and liked sports so it was only natural for him to gravitate to tae kwon do. He trained and practiced tae kwon do through middle school and high school. When he entered Kyung Hee University in South Korea, Chung majored in tae kwon do and competed in state tournaments. He became so accomplished, he was asked to join a demonstration team.

After college, Chung joined the South Korean army for three years and taught tae kwon do, as well as competing in tournaments and winning several championships.

Once his stint in the army was over, Chung immigrated to the United States, where he was scouted by the Jae H Kim School in Boston. He taught tae kwon do there for 10 years before branching out on his own.

Six months ago, he opened the doors of his Nashua school to students.He believes strongly in the principles of tae kwon do and teaches its tenets to children as young as five and to adults that have reached retirement age.

“In Boston, I used to teach a 72-year-old man,” Chung said with a smile.

He feels that tae kwon do is an excellent sport for children because it teaches them how to focus and how to maintain self-control at all times. In addition, Chung said the martial art’s lessons include instruction on courtesy, perseverance, and spirit.

Helping to get a person in shape is only one part of tae kwon do, according to Chung. Each movement is a self-defense technique and overall, tae kwon do helps each individual create a better inner balance. Daily practice also helps relieve stress and develop self-discipline, he said.

Sonhui Rowe has been a student at Chung’s academy since it opened. After two testings, Rowe has achieved her yellow belt.

“Yellow is the foundation color,” she said, showing off her belt.

Rowe trains at least three times a week.

“Tae kwon do gives me a cardiovascular workout,” she said. “It keeps me active. Since I’ve been training, my body feels lighter and more energized. I’m much more focused.”

Rowe, who is in her early 40s, is Chung’s oldest female student. Edit: Yeah, he probably teaches mostly kids.

Chung is considered an internationally certified master instructor in tae kwon do. He is also a certified international referee.

Visit original article for fun pictures and contact information.
http://www.nashuatelegraph.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20041202/BUSINESS/112020019

I hate how WRONG people get TKD's history.

DokterVet
12/05/2004 12:58pm,
Wow, they were wrong by almost exactly 2000 years. Way to go, journalism.

Captain Spaulding
12/06/2004 6:07am,
He was actually my first teacher in Boston from 1995-1998. He's a very good teacher in that he knows when to be patient and encouraging but also knows when to be tough on you. I'm not athletic by any means, but with his help, I was able to learn and perform techniques I never thought possible (after a lot of work, of course). The truth is that my life didn't really have any direction before I started martial arts, and I just happened to start with him. Training gave me a drive to achieve in academics and elsewhere. I'm not bullshitting or making more of it than it is.

I can't speak to the school in Nashua, but the school in Boston is about 80-85% adults, mostly between early 20s to mid 40s. On the other hand, the school in Boston wasn't really the style of TKD that he had learned in Korea and I imagine that, now that he has his own school, he's gone back to what he was most familiar with.

As for the age of TKD going back to 50 BC, it's a BS line that a lot of people use. The way I look at it is that it's better to train somewhere that's good and claims to have a martial art going back too far than to train in a system that some guy thought up last week and made himself 10th dan in. I know that's over simplifying and, again, I don't know what kind of TKD he's teaching in Nashua, but I know he's a good teacher from expirience.

PizDoff
12/06/2004 9:19pm,
Exactly, the incorrect history, to possible promote the art as ancient and special is what I'm am attempting to highlight.

Jenfucius
12/06/2004 9:48pm,
He was actually my first teacher in Boston from 1995-1998. He's a very good teacher in that he knows when to be patient and encouraging but also knows when to be tough on you. I'm not athletic by any means, but with his help, I was able to learn and perform techniques I never thought possible (after a lot of work, of course). The truth is that my life didn't really have any direction before I started martial arts, and I just happened to start with him. Training gave me a drive to achieve in academics and elsewhere. I'm not bullshitting or making more of it than it is.

I can't speak to the school in Nashua, but the school in Boston is about 80-85% adults, mostly between early 20s to mid 40s. On the other hand, the school in Boston wasn't really the style of TKD that he had learned in Korea and I imagine that, now that he has his own school, he's gone back to what he was most familiar with.

As for the age of TKD going back to 50 BC, it's a BS line that a lot of people use. The way I look at it is that it's better to train somewhere that's good and claims to have a martial art going back too far than to train in a system that some guy thought up last week and made himself 10th dan in. I know that's over simplifying and, again, I don't know what kind of TKD he's teaching in Nashua, but I know he's a good teacher from expirience.

come clean with us, you're that 72 year old man aren't you?

Ka-Bar
12/06/2004 10:19pm,
Jinsub Chung practices a form of martial arts that dates back to 50 B.C.


...modern martial arts form...

What?

fivepaknh
1/01/2009 1:10am,
I know this is an old thread, but I did a search on my town, Nashua, and came across this thread.

I’m 45 and brand new to martial arts. I started so I could train with my son. He’s a second Dan in Tae Kwon Do and close to getting his blue belt in BJJ. I train at Chung’s, but with no prior experience in martial arts I have no frame of reference as to what kind of school Chung runs. Though, my son trained at Anctil’s martial arts for 6 years and is changing to Chung’s school starting this Saturday. After he’s been there a little while I’ll ask him his opinion.

I chose Chung’s because I work 3rd shift and he offers classes during the day. Anctil’s does not.

Meex
1/01/2009 1:49am,
Hey, five- welcome to Bullshido.

After he's trained a while, please have your son
post an opinion/review of Chung's program and
teaching, in the Dojo Review section.

You can do one also, and we'll get two opinions
of the dojang, instructor & training to reference.

Thanks!
`~/

fivepaknh
1/06/2009 12:28am,
My son has been to 2 classes and so far so good. Prior to his classes there's a childrens class. Watching the little kids spar he was somewhat impressed with how technical they were. He also likes the way Chung teaches.

His old school was Anctil's Martial arts. The guy is a good martial artist, but he has some personality issues, and because of personal adventures he runs off to do, he ran his business into the ground. In an attempt to recover from his failing business he's gouging his students at every turn.