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lurkness
9/24/2004 10:06am,
I have been at my school for 3 years and it is getting more and more commercial. I started in BJJ which is the main program IMO but then switched to the stand up after getting injured.

The stand up program is about 80% MT and 10% escrima.The instuctor is certified under Arjan Chai and the instruction and techniques are excellent.

Gripes-the belt system
OK I know belts arent that important but it would be nice to achieve black belt but everyone knows MT has no belts and they will promote people who have poor techniqe as long as they come to enough classes and pay the 25$ test fee.
Also they want everyone to wear karate pants now...WTF

Everytime they run ads they sign up more people who IMO are more suited for Jaazzersise or the like.

The BJJ program is top notch, got my blue from Pedro Sauer, but I discovered I like MT better so now I am torn between loyalty to the school or training somewhere closer with better class times, no kids running around and more sparring.
I think Mcdojo buisness practices with good insruction is the new trend.
website is www.worldclasskick.com

Shuma-Gorath
9/24/2004 10:19am,
Hmm... why is it the striking arts always seem to be easier prey for commercialism?

Don't be afraid to jump ship, man. I spent three years watching a school go downhill and tried to rationalize that I was able to get better training despite the average and median continually dropping. What you will realize sooner or later is that the lowest common denominator drags everything down without exception. Start shopping for a new Muay Thai school, or maybe send a letter to Chai explaining your current situation at one of his student's schools and ask if he has anyone else in the area.

Colin
9/24/2004 10:26am,
I agree with Shu. Life's to short to spend it in a shitty class.

PoleFighter
9/24/2004 4:04pm,
Originally posted by Shumagorath
Hmm... why is it the striking arts always seem to be easier prey for commercialism?



I think this is because it's harder to verify who is a good striker, since serious comparison of skill can be dangerous, while grappling matches are virtually injury free. Matches can allways be rejected on that basis.

Grappling hasn't reached out into the mainstream either. Striking is also flashier (the main reason I think TKD and KF have gone down hill.. they just looked to cool for their own good) and more superdeadly. You just don't get that bad ass rep from being a judoka, thus it's harder to sell the dream to the ignorant.

albert
9/24/2004 4:38pm,
Leave immediately. If they keep on promoting anyone who pays the fee and comes to class, basically it will build (if one isn't in place already) a base of senior students who suck. The sucky senior students will spread their pathology to others, attracting still suckier people to the school. You will not improve if you train with a bunch of cans. Find another school if possible.

Traditional Tom
9/24/2004 8:42pm,
Once you get the fat black belts, its game over man! game over!

wingchunnewbie
9/25/2004 6:20am,
Originally posted by Shumagorath
[B]Hmm... why is it the striking arts always seem to be easier prey for commercialism?

Because it's easier to attract MA-movie watching newbies with striking arts containing high kicks and the like. It looks more like what they've seen in movies than stuff that involves rolling around on the floor.

Crucified
9/25/2004 7:36am,
Originally posted by wingchunnewbie
Because it's easier to attract MA-movie watching newbies with striking arts containing high kicks and the like. It looks more like what they've seen in movies than stuff that involves rolling around on the floor.

Yep, so often I've seen new guys come in saying they saw whatever new movie with martial arts in it and want to learn it. Well at least thats when I was going to a McDojo...

CrimsonTiger
9/26/2004 12:16am,
I hate to agree with Shum on this, but truth is truth...don't sit and watch your school go to ****.

I'm watching mine degrade before my very eyes. Luckily, I jumped to MT before my dojo fell into crapness, but it still irks me to work out there (they have a great bag room that nobody but me uses!) and watch pompous, fat losers wear brown and black belts. *sigh*

Shuma-Gorath
9/26/2004 12:23am,
Originally posted by CrimsonTiger
I hate to agree with Shum on this

:confused:

CrimsonTiger
9/26/2004 1:45am,
Sorry dude, that's not a shot at you as a poster (i.e. at your martial opinions), but surely you realize that you and I have...fundamentally different ideas about some people on here?

I'm also in a bit of a bad mood tonight, so that probably came out a bit harsh.

PizDoff
9/26/2004 3:36am,
Are you two cheating on me?

lurkness
9/26/2004 11:46am,
Yeah I know in my heart that it is going downhill but you know how it is to rationalize training somewhere because you like the people or are just comfortable there.
I have two other schools to check out when my contract runs out. One produces ameteur fighters and the owner is also a promoter for kickboxing and MMA shows in this state.

Sad thing is that within 12 miles of my house ther are 4 Kung Fu schools, 2 Mcdojo karate and 1 TKD.

WhiteShark
9/26/2004 12:26pm,
If you are at a Muay Thai school that doesn't produce fighters you aren't really at a Muay Thai school.

CrimsonTiger
9/26/2004 1:34pm,
BAM! Couldn't have said it better myself.

Shuma-Gorath
9/26/2004 2:10pm,
Originally posted by lurkness
Yeah I know in my heart that it is going downhill but you know how it is to rationalize training somewhere because you like the people or are just comfortable there.

I got my black belt at a place that had been going McDojo for at least half the time I was there. My contract ran out nine days after my BB grading so I decided to renew after exams (two months). Long story short I didn't go back for seven months, and during that time I was taking Judo and signed up at my current school. When I did go back to say hello I realized how much I didn't miss anyone.

You will enjoy training with people much more when you respect them as martial artists.