PDA

View Full Version : Airmen take martial arts before deploying



PizDoff
7/31/2004 3:56pm,
Airmen take martial arts before deploying


By LISA ROSKELLEY
Ogden Standard-Examiner

July 27 - In light of recent hostage-takings and decapitations, deploying airmen are being trained in hand-to-hand combat in a program being developed here with a master martial artist.

THE FIRST of its kind in the Air Force, the integrated martial arts program teaches airmen tactics from various disciplines of martial arts to defend themselves when their weapons don't work or aren't available.

"We know the terrorist organizations are training right now in self-defense," said Maj. Doug Ballinger, commander of the 75th Security Forces Squadron. "The enemy has risen it to the next level; we're just responding to them."

For Ballinger, this program is the realization of a dream based on the extensive martial arts training done in the Marine Corp. He believes that airmen need to be exposed to this sort of hand-to-hand training in order to be fully prepared to be in a combat zone.

"Taking you hostage and using a knife to saw off your head, that's the flavor of the month, but not on my watch," he said. "If you're taken hostage and there's only one Iraqi between you and a convoy, you better know this stuff and be able to take him out quickly and be out the door."

The U.S. Air Force Martial Arts Combat School was Ballinger's brainchild, and all people being deployed from the 75th Air Base Wing will go through the training.

"I think the Air Force needs a standard system across the board," Ballinger said, hoping that his program can spawn something more significant and universal down the road.

Master Manuel Taningco is not in the military but was hired by Hill to help develop a program of integrated martial arts. He has already trained a group of a dozen assistant trainers who will spend the next month helping him train more airmen and learning to become trainers themselves.

"Because wherever they go, they can take this: work, home, definitely in combat and on the streets," Taningco said.

The rigorous program trains airmen for a week, teaching them techniques from seven different concentrations of martial arts, pitting the airmen against each other in simulated situations with various simulated weapons, from knives to guns.

The first two classes are being done this week, training 100 airmen. Another, similar regimen will be done next week. Finally, in August, the assistant trainers will be given two more weeks of training to help them become full-fledged instructors to carry the program forward.

"It wasn't what I expected," said Airman 1st Class Ben Finch, who trained as an assistant instructor. "I was thinking right off the bat we'd be learning maneuvers, but for the first two days all we did was cardio, exercise."

A member of the 75th Logistics Readiness Squadron, Finch, who had no previous martial arts training, said his two-week training gave him a different perspective, and he hopes to go on to become an instructor.

"All of us, not just LRS, not just Security Forces, we're all going into a combat zone," Finch said. "If you do run out of ammunition, if we do get attacked, we need to be prepared."

Right now the program is being offered to 75th Security Forces Squadron and 75th Logistics Readiness Squadron members.

However, Ballinger expects other organizations from the base will be interested in getting the training once the program is fully developed.

"This training is critical for all U.S. military personnel," said Staff Sgt. Jason Leap, a criminal investigator with the 75th Security Forces Squadron. "This preparation in self-defense is necessary because our job is changing every day and self-defense is critical to not only the safety of ourselves but to the safety of our teammates."

Leap said, during his nine years in the Air Force, he has never received training like the program he is going through now.





http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/5528161/


I like Major Ballinger's grammar.

wildwills
11/18/2005 2:22pm,
Is this posting meant to slight Master Taningco in someway or just the Major's grammar????


Respectfully
Capt Mike Wills, Capt , USAF
Martial Art: Tama Ryu Kenpo Jujitsu (Master Manuel Taningco)

Peter H.
11/18/2005 4:33pm,
wildwills,

You put capt in your signature twice.

How much experience does Taningco have teaching military?
Why go outside of the USAF when there are plenty of qualified guys in USAF?
Is it based on previous work done with many of the Prime BEEF teams?

Edit: Found the answers to my questions already. Instruction quality seems good, now I am just wondering why it is only two weeks and how much and what is being packed into that two weeks.

daigoro
11/18/2005 5:39pm,
If anything should be slighted, it is AF pf levels. :)





Sorry for that old intra-service rivalry bizness.

Heres another story on this
http://www.hilltoptimes.com/story.asp?edition=164&storyid=4647
An article on MAJ Ballinger
http://www.hilltoptimes.com/Lifetimes.asp?edition=138
A quick blurb on the 1st ISD graduating class
http://www.hilltoptimes.com/Images.asp?edition=167

Darkpaladin
11/18/2005 6:01pm,
Edit: Found the answers to my questions already. Instruction quality seems good, now I am just wondering why it is only two weeks and how much and what is being packed into that two weeks.

It's actually one week of training. Two weeks is in order to become an instructor. That isn't nearly long enough to learn anything.

But I'm sure someone will make a dvd and sell it as "the super elite airman defense system that will crush attackers with only a week of training!"

Peter H.
11/18/2005 9:22pm,
It's actually one week of training. Two weeks is in order to become an instructor. That isn't nearly long enough to learn anything.

But I'm sure someone will make a dvd and sell it as "the super elite airman defense system that will crush attackers with only a week of training!"

Damn, one week?

That's the same length of time the AF's Workgroup Manager course is. And that's 8 hours a day at that course. That's a bit scary.

wildwills
11/21/2005 8:13am,
My apologies for putting Capt twice in my signature block. Didn't have time to do a proper check...had to run off to a staff meeting.

To answer the question of why the class is only one week, I think you need to look at the target audience. Here at Wright-Patterson AFB, Master Taningco has also given coursework through government contract to the 88 Security Forces squadron.

As you can imagine, most of the ISD course work relies on lock-flows and other jujitsu/chin na joint-lock techniques.

So as the target audience is typically security forces and other law enforcement personnel, I think the course work is structured to add-on to what they already know...seizure and control.

It would be really interesting though to here from any recipients at Hill or WPAFB and what they thought of the course.

Peter H.
11/21/2005 10:37am,
The article suggests that this is being taught to all personel. While a 1 week add-on may be helpful to SFS, I question the benefit of teaching it to other members. Having taught guys straight out of basic, as well permanent party members, for about 5 years, I know the kind of skills coming out of, and honestly, they aren't ****.

PizDoff
11/22/2005 1:19am,
Wow. Don't even remember posting this article.
They even deleted it off their servers, which is why I tend to C&P the text over most of the time.