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battlefields
11/22/2018 5:22pm,
Right boys (and girls, I suppose, I'm a feminist after all), I have committed myself to smoking ham for Christmas on my fairly new bullet smoker. I have successfully smoked chicken drumsticks, and somewhat successfully smoked a couple of beef porterhouse roasts (probably a tad overcooked, but you know, second run with the thing so I can't be too hard on myself, still tasted off the chain).

I've noted that there are a number of methods to setting up your coals, etc, and I think I've found one that works for me. I'm in a group at my gym called Armbar-be-que, we exchange hints and tips with each other, so thought, "hey, I know of this other place that has, or wants, a whole heap of testosterone and is already a sausage fest" so I came here and wrote this.

If you're a meat smoker, throw your favourite recipes, rubs, meats, recommended cooking times, anything you can think of that might help a ************ in this party season to make it that much better.

And if someone can help me out with glaze recipe for the smoked ham, and any hints and tips directly related to it using a bullet smoker, that'd be awesome (also, remember it is summer here in Australia, in case the outside temperature was a concern.

Cheers and happy holidays!

BKR
11/22/2018 10:36pm,
Are you going to buy a raw ham and cure it yourself, then cook it ?

I cure raw back upper leg roast of pig with Morton's
Tenderquick plus Brown sugar, and pickling spices. I will pump liquid cure in, then do a dry rub, put it in a 2gallon Ziploc bag and put in fridge, turning and rubbing every few hours. The one we just ate cured for 2 days.

I cold smoke mine in an small electric smoker, then cook in oven at 350 deg until done.

Smoking while cooking, you need to keep the temperature at some constant to where you don't get it so hot that it makes the smoke taste bad.

Otherwise you're just using your bullet smoker as an oven and applying some smoke early in the process to taste.

submessenger
11/22/2018 11:55pm,
I prefer to rub my smoked meats. I don't have a codified recipe, but it usually involves something like this (depending on size of meat, too, you may need to adjust proportionally)

4 parts brown sugar
2 parts fresh ground black pepper
2 parts garlic powder
2 parts onion powder
1 part salt
1 part chili powder

Occasionally, I'll throw in some 5-spice and/or cinnamon. Those would work great for ham, I think. Drop the onion powder and chili powder, and cut back on the garlic powder and black pepper, but add the 5-spice. Jam a handful of cloves in, while you're at it.

A ham is a big hunk of meat, it's probably going to take quite a while if raw. If pre-cooked, you can probably escape in 4 hours or so.

If raw, I would suggest a salt brine for 24 hours before you put in the smoker. Then do the rub, while the fire is heating up. And that's probably a 1-2 day smoke, so, good luck.

I like to smoke between 180 and 225 F.

I find that throwing dry chips on the coals, rather than making the little foil packets of soaked chips, imparts more flavor. You have to use a lot more chips, though. Conversely, using the soaked chips in foil packets, you get two runs - first smoke in the packet turns them into actual charcoal, then you dump that out into the coals for a second wind.

For a ham, I would say applewood would be a nice flavor.

Diesel_tke
11/27/2018 9:33am,
I like to inject some marinade, different ones depending on which cut of meat I'm smoking. Then I put mustard over the meat, and a dry rub over top of the mustard. The mustard cooks off and doesn't add flavor, it's just to keep the dry rub on. I soaked a ham in coke one time on the fly when I didn't have any marinade and it turned out pretty good, too.

I typically smoke between 225 and 250 for pork. I always use probes to monitor the internal temperature while smoking. I'm assuming you are dong the ham with a bone in? Usually takes 1.5 hours per pound if you smoke to 160 degrees.

After I pull the ham out, I like to use some squirt butter and put a thin layer over top, then cover that in honey. Then cover the whole thing in foil and let it sit for a while and rest. If you are going for a honey glaze type flavor.

submessenger
11/27/2018 9:44am,
I'm 50/50 on the injection thing. I've only done with brisket using beef stock. I think it comes out pretty good, but it's definitely a different product. I didn't consider using anything more substantial than just beef stock, so perhaps that will change my mind.

Hopefully, I'll be smoking some fresh venison in the very near future, a good opportunity to experiment.

scipio
11/27/2018 10:10am,
I find that throwing dry chips on the coals, rather than making the little foil packets of soaked chips, imparts more flavor. You have to use a lot more chips, though. Conversely, using the soaked chips in foil packets, you get two runs - first smoke in the packet turns them into actual charcoal, then you dump that out into the coals for a second wind.

For a ham, I would say applewood would be a nice flavor.

I've started going around the hedgerow and getting different types of UK wood - oak, cherry, beech, apple and some bay. Rather than use the small chips I've cutting the wood into chunks roughly a couple of inches square (minimum size) and putting them at regular intervals (not soaked) on the coals. I'm finding you get better results than using the chips (plus it's cheaper).

You can keep feeding them in every so often

Diesel_tke
11/27/2018 10:23am,
I'm 50/50 on the injection thing. I've only done with brisket using beef stock. I think it comes out pretty good, but it's definitely a different product. I didn't consider using anything more substantial than just beef stock, so perhaps that will change my mind.

Hopefully, I'll be smoking some fresh venison in the very near future, a good opportunity to experiment.

I get this creole butter that is made by Tony Chacheries, I think. That is really good in a boston butt.

Diesel_tke
11/27/2018 10:31am,
I've got a pellet smoker, side smoker, and an electric smoker. All require a little different wood and heat methods. With the pellet smoker I like to get a good bed of coals and use chips, mainly because you have direct heat coming up and adding large chunks of wood can increase your cooking temps. Adding already lit coals as needed to maintain temp. With my side smoker I use a basket that I built and layer coals and wood chunks. Then I heat a chimney of coals up in a webber chimney starter. I toss those on top of the basket of coals when they are red hot. Then I put whole logs over those coals. In the side smoker eventually the wood is the temp source and the smoke source. On the electric smoker, you are basically cooking in an oven with a secondary smoke source. That can either be done through a side smoker or a smoke source like the amazing smoke tray, which works well.

submessenger
11/27/2018 10:37am,
I've started going around the hedgerow and getting different types of UK wood - oak, cherry, beech, apple and some bay. Rather than use the small chips I've cutting the wood into chunks roughly a couple of inches square (minimum size) and putting them at regular intervals (not soaked) on the coals. I'm finding you get better results than using the chips (plus it's cheaper).

You can keep feeding them in every so often

I've got a medium-sized stack of oak and maple logs from pruning in my back yard, just itching to get put to use. I was also thinking about projecting some of those logs into decorative stuff, but no significant ideas have hit me, yet.

scipio
11/27/2018 10:51am,
I've got a medium-sized stack of oak and maple logs from pruning in my back yard, just itching to get put to use. I was also thinking about projecting some of those logs into decorative stuff, but no significant ideas have hit me, yet.

Don't really have maple over here but oak is a great wood for smoking, probably my favorite overall wood

scipio
11/27/2018 10:54am,
I'm 50/50 on the injection thing. I've only done with brisket using beef stock. I think it comes out pretty good, but it's definitely a different product. I didn't consider using anything more substantial than just beef stock, so perhaps that will change my mind.

Hopefully, I'll be smoking some fresh venison in the very near future, a good opportunity to experiment.

I did inject apple juice into a turkey a while ago and it came out out excellent. I've tried the various injectable marinades (mainly got them from BassPro), I found there were Ok for stronger meats but again it's more fun (and cheaper to make your own).

Still haven't tried brining yet.....

submessenger
11/27/2018 11:02am,
@diesel, saw your T-day preparation in the other thread, but decided to concentrate on battlefields' meat, here. So, in response:

Day before T-day, I did bacon-wrapped pork tenderloin. It was fan-fucking-tastic. Cheap ass store-brand bacon, thin sliced and stretchy, you get two passes around the steak rounds, which I cut about 1.5 inches (bacon width) across the entire hunk. Pin with a soaked toothpick, and cooked on 500+ grill with a little salt and pepper rubbed on each side.

T-day was chateaubriand, huge beef tenderloins, fresh course-ground black pepper rub, oven at 500 until center temp hits 140, then down to 350 until center temp hits 165; rest for 15 minutes (yeah, right, we were eating that meat right off the cutting board as soon as it left the oven), then serve.

Diesel_tke
11/27/2018 11:20am,
@diesel, saw your T-day preparation in the other thread, but decided to concentrate on battlefields' meat, here. So, in response:

Day before T-day, I did bacon-wrapped pork tenderloin. It was fan-fucking-tastic. Cheap ass store-brand bacon, thin sliced and stretchy, you get two passes around the steak rounds, which I cut about 1.5 inches (bacon width) across the entire hunk. Pin with a soaked toothpick, and cooked on 500+ grill with a little salt and pepper rubbed on each side.

T-day was chateaubriand, huge beef tenderloins, fresh course-ground black pepper rub, oven at 500 until center temp hits 140, then down to 350 until center temp hits 165; rest for 15 minutes (yeah, right, we were eating that meat right off the cutting board as soon as it left the oven), then serve.

Sounds great! I think my next project is going to be beef ribs. I smoke pork ribs so much that the kids just expect it on the weekends. I have to cook two racks because they tear through them like wild dogs. I think I'm going to go get some beef ribs from the butcher and see how they turn out. My uncle cooks them all the time but I've only stuck to pork.

submessenger
11/27/2018 11:42am,
I did inject apple juice into a turkey a while ago and it came out out excellent. I've tried the various injectable marinades (mainly got them from BassPro), I found there were Ok for stronger meats but again it's more fun (and cheaper to make your own).

Still haven't tried brining yet.....

I brine everything significant, now. Fish, poultry, beef, pork... even 3-4 hours in a brine makes a huge difference.

Raycetpfl
11/27/2018 12:41pm,
T-day was chateaubriand, huge beef tenderloins, fresh course-ground black pepper rub, oven at 500 until center temp hits 140, then down to 350 until center temp hits 165; rest for 15 minutes (yeah, right, we were eating that meat right off the cutting board as soon as it left the oven), then serve.

You shouldn't be allowed near beef in any capacity.

submessenger
11/27/2018 1:01pm,
You shouldn't be allowed near beef in any capacity.

I do not think you know as much about cooking as you think you do. These were 5-6 pound slabs of beef, cooked whole, not the days-old bacon-wrapped tiny 6oz steaks you get from Publix in styrofoam and plastic wrap.