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TheMightyMcClaw
1/15/2018 5:09pm,
So, I recently came across the concept of "Triangle Theory" in boxing. As I understand it, it breaks boxing down into three general styles:
-Swarmers, who stay close and crowd their opponent with aggressive short punches (ie, hooks and uppercuts)
-Sluggers, who focus on throwing single, large, power shots
-Outboxers, who focus on staying at range and picking their opponent apart

And the theory then goes that a Slugger will have advantage over a swarmer, a swarmer will have advantage over an outboxer, and an outboxer over a sluggger.
It's worth noting that I don't follow boxing, nor have I ever trained at a boxing gym, so the above may be a bit inaccurate or reductive. What's more, I get the impression that within the boxing community there's a fair amount of skepticism toward this framework.

Still, the concept has definitely captured my imagination, particular as it might apply or not apply to kickboxing/muay thai. There are some obvious differences - the presence of a clinch makes crowding someone an entirely different game, as fighters tend to naturally clinch up once in close-punching range. On the flipside, the addition of leg kicks makes playing a long-range "outboxing" style much easier.

I don't really have any conclusions I'm trying to draw here, and I'm mostly trying to put it to the forum of 'is this framework useful, and if so, is it useful outside of boxing'?

lant3rn
1/15/2018 7:43pm,
So, I recently came across the concept of "Triangle Theory" in boxing. As I understand it, it breaks boxing down into three general styles:
-Swarmers, who stay close and crowd their opponent with aggressive short punches (ie, hooks and uppercuts)
-Sluggers, who focus on throwing single, large, power shots
-Outboxers, who focus on staying at range and picking their opponent apart

And the theory then goes that a Slugger will have advantage over a swarmer, a swarmer will have advantage over an outboxer, and an outboxer over a sluggger.
It's worth noting that I don't follow boxing, nor have I ever trained at a boxing gym, so the above may be a bit inaccurate or reductive. What's more, I get the impression that within the boxing community there's a fair amount of skepticism toward this framework.

Still, the concept has definitely captured my imagination, particular as it might apply or not apply to kickboxing/muay thai. There are some obvious differences - the presence of a clinch makes crowding someone an entirely different game, as fighters tend to naturally clinch up once in close-punching range. On the flipside, the addition of leg kicks makes playing a long-range "outboxing" style much easier.

I don't really have any conclusions I'm trying to draw here, and I'm mostly trying to put it to the forum of 'is this framework useful, and if so, is it useful outside of boxing'?

When training, i have never come across this idea at the gym. I first heard about it watching fights on HBO but they used that frame work to show what kind of match ups make the most interesting fights to watch; not about what style has an edge over the other.

Bneterasedmynam
1/18/2018 4:28pm,
So, I recently came across the concept of "Triangle Theory" in boxing. As I understand it, it breaks boxing down into three general styles:
-Swarmers, who stay close and crowd their opponent with aggressive short punches (ie, hooks and uppercuts)
-Sluggers, who focus on throwing single, large, power shots
-Outboxers, who focus on staying at range and picking their opponent apart

And the theory then goes that a Slugger will have advantage over a swarmer, a swarmer will have advantage over an outboxer, and an outboxer over a sluggger.
It's worth noting that I don't follow boxing, nor have I ever trained at a boxing gym, so the above may be a bit inaccurate or reductive. What's more, I get the impression that within the boxing community there's a fair amount of skepticism toward this framework.

Still, the concept has definitely captured my imagination, particular as it might apply or not apply to kickboxing/muay thai. There are some obvious differences - the presence of a clinch makes crowding someone an entirely different game, as fighters tend to naturally clinch up once in close-punching range. On the flipside, the addition of leg kicks makes playing a long-range "outboxing" style much easier.

I don't really have any conclusions I'm trying to draw here, and I'm mostly trying to put it to the forum of 'is this framework useful, and if so, is it useful outside of boxing'?

Ok I'm going to say it...I think this triangle is bullshit. It's just narrow-minded. It reminds me of the combat triangle from the video game DOA. I think trying to hard classify boxing types is a set up for failure.

IMightBeWrong
5/13/2018 9:04pm,
I haven't been in a boxing gym in years and stopped watching it around the time Mayweather fought Hatton but this is my opinion. I still occasionally watch big fights like Canelo vs GGG but not as interested in it now as MMA.

The only value it has IMHO is in generalizing somebody's style. For new fans to the sport to have a super basic idea of what to expect from fighters they're not yet familiar with. There are soooo many styles out there. Learned and instilled styles like Cus taught Tyson, unique to the fighter styles, counter punching styles, whole different methods of defense from a classic guard to the type Mayweather uses, etc... Plus there's no way to paint every fighter into one of those 3 boxes. One fighter's game plan with somebody shorter than him vs taller and lankier than him will change pretty drastically. Plus the way Tyson would fight inside would be totally different from how, say, Roberto Duran would fight on the inside. There's still plenty of fun to be had watching two infighters ("swarmers") go at it and see how their individual styles work out against each other.

As far as Muay Thai goes, I think this is less applicable. The way range is used in Muay Thai is very different due to both the clinch and due to kicks, knees, and elbows. It becomes even harder to box somebody into a category when the techniques you have to choose from are more diverse whether you're on the outside, in the pocket, or in the clinch. It's a much wider striking range to work in with all the extra weapons at your disposal. This allows every fighter more options to avoid being one dimensional.

Again, just my 2 cents as a hobbyist and casual fan.