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PizDoff
5/17/2004 8:07pm,
Whoooooooooaaaaaaaaa! How cool is this?
Personally I haven't seen any of our swordsmen/women/person in training, but they are there, All dressed up and ready to slice!




http://www.uoguelph.ca/mediarel/archives/005255.html


News Release
May 13, 2004

Japanese samurai training to be held at U of G
There’s no need to go to Japan or to watch The Last Samurai or Kill Bill to see some of the world’s leaders in samurai training. Swordsmen from Japan, the United States and across Canada will be participating in the University of Guelph’s sword arts school’s 14th annual jodo and iaido training seminar May 21 to 24 at the W.F. Mitchell Athletics Centre. The public is invited to register or to attend as spectators.

Although these rarer forms of martial arts are practised by only a few hundred Canadians, more than 100 people from as far as South Africa, Europe and Japan travel to Guelph annually to participate in four days of workshops led by the world’s highest-ranked swordsmen.

Iaido is a solo martial art that focuses on drawing a Japanese sword from its sheath and cutting it through the air in one motion. Unlike karate and other martial arts that focus on self-defence, the purpose of iaido is to perfect a form, said Kim Taylor, the founder of U of G’s Sei Do Kai martial arts club and seminar organizer.

“There’s an ideal form that you have in your mind and you’re trying to match that picture,” he said. “But it’s not as internal as some forms of meditative exercise because in iaido, you can’t forget that there’s an enemy out there. You have to stay in tune with the world around you.”

Participants use a 25- to 30-inch blade with a foot-long handle. Taylor says iaido students aren’t allowed to use a real blade until they reach a fourth dan, or fourth-degree black belt. Belts in iaido, worn under a traditional skirt called a hakama, don’t use a colour-ranking system. Even though iaido participants don’t have a human opponent, they must achieve complete control of their thoughts and movements to succeed. “The minute you worry about other things, the sword will bite you,” said Taylor. He has seen people injure themselves with their own weapons.

Jodo, an even rarer martial art, is practised in partners. One person holds a four-foot staff and tries to defend against a partner armed with a sword. Taylor holds Canada’s highest ranking in jodo and a sixth dan in iaido.

Shieya Mitsuo and Furukawa Shunya of Japan will lead the jodo sessions. Tom Hooper of the United States and Canadian swordsmen Goyo Ohmi, Ken Maneker, Stephen Cruise and Dave Green will lead the iaido sessions. Older forms of sword arts called zen ken ren iai and zen ken ren jo will also be taught to encourage people to keep practising more traditional schools of Japanese swording. Instruction will cover basic to advanced techniques.

Sessions will be held daily between 9 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. To register or for more information, visit www.uoguelph.ca/~iaido/iai.seminar.html.

Jenfucius
5/17/2004 9:07pm,
correction: iaido students can't AFFORD to use a real blade until fourth dan.

Te No Kage!
5/19/2004 12:14pm,
My naginata instructor and her husband practice battodo and last year he dropped his katana and it landed tip down on his foot. He almost lost a toe, but he eventually healed.

silver
5/19/2004 12:39pm,
I do a sword art and real swords are crazy expensive(if you want a good one you can use... on bamboo I mean). Plus, the dangers involved in using a real sword are immense. They are about as sharp as a scalple. In my art your pre black belt training is just to get you ready to use a real sword.

I bought a real, hand forged sword and man it was worth the money... it is a real rush to use. You can really tell the difference too, both in the balance, and in how it cuts. I dig sword MA's becuase they, or at least the one I do, is great for developing concentration and self discipline. It also builds absolutely massive forearms... great for locking holds and grips in BJJ.

As far as I know though, Iaido focuses mainly on the drawing of the sword. It was developed becuase samurai duels, like the old west, were often won by the guy who could draw the fastest. Kenjitsu(Japan) and Haidong Gumdo(Korea) are more along the lines of a total "samurai" cirriculums.

blankslate
5/19/2004 1:28pm,
"Jodo, an even rarer martial art, is practised in partners. One person holds a four-foot staff and tries to defend against a partner armed with a sword. "


That ought to be good!

Ronin
5/19/2004 2:02pm,
What about "seppuku" ???

Te No Kage!
5/19/2004 2:23pm,
Actually I would be very surprised if any art could actually claim to teach a comprehensive samurai system. You would have to learn horseback riding, kyudo, kendo, iaido, jujutsu, yari/naginata and on and on. Ronin is probably one of the few on this site that actually has trained in a koryu system that has more than one weapon in it. Iaido is just as important as kendo from what I've heard. If you can't draw your sword then you can't fight, and if you can't fight then drawing your sword after the first cut is meaningless. But don't forget that the ai uchi was an aim of sword combat (mutual death) which isn't too cool for me.

Blankslate, you've never heard of jodo before, it's pretty cool, the jo is actually a very useful weapon, and it can be used effectively against a katana, remember that the katana is a cutting/slicing weapon not a hacking weapon (like broad swords, axes and such)

blankslate
5/19/2004 2:29pm,
"Blankslate, you've never heard of jodo before, it's pretty cool, the jo is actually a very useful weapon, and it can be used effectively against a katana, remember that the katana is a cutting/slicing weapon not a hacking weapon (like broad swords, axes and such)"

yes, didn't Musashi get defeated by some Jodo master...that sounds cool. I just can't imagine many beginners doing that well against a sword at first but it would be some fun viewing.

I'd like to learn it becuase I'll be walking with a cane or long staff soon enough.

Ronin
5/19/2004 2:31pm,
Outside of japan, you won't find any Traditional ( koryu) that teaches a COMPLETE syllabus.
Heck my experince in the Yagu shinkage ryu and the very limited one in the Tenshin Shoden Katori Shinto ryu, were limited to Kenjutsu, yarijutsu, naginatajutsu, bojutsu, beyond that there was kyujutsu.
And all that is a drop in the ocean from what is taught in a complete koryu.

I am still looking for a seppuku sensei, they seem very hard to find...

Te No Kage!
5/19/2004 3:09pm,
look to the Monte Python suicide squad

Te No Kage!
5/19/2004 3:17pm,
Originally posted by blankslate
[B I just can't imagine many beginners doing that well against a sword at first but it would be some fun viewing.

I'd like to learn it becuase I'll be walking with a cane or long staff soon enough. [/B]

I can't imagine anybody doing that well anymore, beginner or otherwise, it's kind of hard to train "aliveness" with a katana, but I do believe that some kendo schools teach jodo which would be really cool, at least they get to really wack each other. I got hit in the head with a jo in February, I'm lucky I'm not dead, it was a full on 270 deg elbow strike that went crazy and beaned me right on my brow ridge. I bled like a stuck hog, but I didn't get knocked out, luckily I got hit on the hardest part of my head so I didn't get a concussion or lose an eyeball. I did have a pretty good goose egg though and my eyeball got all bloodshot. Anyways, after you get hit with a hickory jo at full speed, you realize that it's the real deal. And I still have a lump on my head.

Ronin
5/19/2004 3:19pm,
Having a piece of hardwood racing towards your head give a whole other meaning to "positional strategy".

silver
5/20/2004 10:22am,
Yeah, I fought a guy who was using a Jo with a bamboo sword, and it was a good match. A jo is a very dangerous weapon for sure.

The sword MA I do is a pretty comprehensive (sword only)system. It involves a small amount of horse training(as much as you can do without the horse), and I ride horseback at my cottage in Canada and some of the balance/control techniques actaully worked. It also involves open hand, forms, mental exercises/mediation, cutting of Bamboo and Straw at a begijan, and full contact sparring. Not like Kendo... kicks and all the rest are fair game(even grappling). Some of the stuff isn't allowed in competitions but when you are in the Dojang things get pretty intense.

I don't really like Kendo. It is very limited in its sparring and alot of the hits done with the light bamboo swords are impossible with a real blade. Ronin, where did you train? What did the cirriculum involve? I've never heard of an art training in Naginata or yari... cool.

Ronin
5/20/2004 10:48am,
My most recent training has been at the Japanese cultural center in toronto.

Te No Kage!
5/20/2004 11:43am,
Originally posted by silver
Yeah, I fought a guy who was using a Jo with a bamboo sword, and it was a good match. A jo is a very dangerous weapon for sure.

The sword MA I do is a pretty comprehensive (sword only)system. It involves a small amount of horse training(as much as you can do without the horse), and I ride horseback at my cottage in Canada and some of the balance/control techniques actaully worked. It also involves open hand, forms, mental exercises/mediation, cutting of Bamboo and Straw at a begijan, and full contact sparring. Not like Kendo... kicks and all the rest are fair game(even grappling). Some of the stuff isn't allowed in competitions but when you are in the Dojang things get pretty intense.

I don't really like Kendo. It is very limited in its sparring and alot of the hits done with the light bamboo swords are impossible with a real blade. Ronin, where did you train? What did the cirriculum involve? I've never heard of an art training in Naginata or yari... cool.

Silver, what sword art do you practice? Sounds fun. I practice atarashii naginata, it's similar to kendo but with a bambo bladed naginata www.scnf.org

silver
5/22/2004 1:18am,
I practice Haidong Gumdo ( http://www.hdgd.org/ ). I Checked out your site and it looks like really cool stuff. I'd give my left nut to spar agains one of you guys; I've fought against many different styles and different weapons, but never a Naginata... Just out of curiosity, how would you approach an opponent with a sword(of Japanese/Korean style)?

Are you in T.O Ronin? My old Master has recently set up a school there.