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mrtnira
8/07/2016 5:02pm,
The 1981 editor's proof copy of a Soviet Union military combat manual during the transition from the World War II model of training to one that included karate-style training:
https://www.scribd.com/document/320466785/Editors-Proof-Copy-1981-Soviet-Hand-to-Hand

And, here is an images only version so that people who want to use it as a training manual can do it without all of the military doctrine and unit training plan information:
https://www.scribd.com/document/320466691/Soviet-1981-Hand-to-Hand-Editors-Images-Only

Here's the description. The Cyrillic is retained for the purpose of allowing people to do their own research if they want to.
Description: This is a modified version of the editor's proof copy of a 1981 Soviet Union Army hand to hand combat manual. The title in Russian is руколашный бой.

This version is an images only copy, so that someone interested in self-defense, martial arts, or military close quarters combat training in the 20th century can have a quick look at this transition from post-World War II Soviet training, to the ingestion of karate-style movements into the body of training and doctrine.

On-line translators use the terms close-handed, melee, or dogfight.

The scan reflects the rough paper the editor's proof copy, or mock-up, was made on. And, some of the editor's final markings are occasionally seen in marks on the page.

The book includes some karate moves which were being integrated into Soviet military close-quarters combat training in the late-1970s and early-1980s. Standard jiu-jitsu (ju jutsu) self-defense and defense against weapons (gun take away, knife defense) are also shown.

The introduction of karate-style forms (kata) are found here with three sets of "special" exercises (комплекс специальных упражнении). Two of the forms are unarmed combat, and one form is for use with the rifle and bayonet in close-quarters defensive combat. (комплекс аеисмвии с оружием, automated complex dance with weapon.)

Wounded Ronin
8/15/2016 11:46pm,
Why did the Soviet Union choose to go with karate? Just curious.

mrtnira
8/16/2016 6:30am,
Wounded Ronin, I suspect it was "the spirit of the age", or the zeitgeist as German historians would phrase it. The movement to include karate-style training into military hand-to-hand was somewhat universal in both the Communist bloc and the NATO countries at the time. The East Germans actually had North Korean trainers come to East Germany to help them integrate karate into their training plan in the early-1980s. If you look up Frank Pelny, he published GJOGSUL in 2005. It is about the induction of karate into the East German body of doctrine and training. He was an instructor in the East German People's Army at the time and was on of the men involved with the North Koreans.

Mr. Pelny has a page on military close combat in East Germany: http://www.saco-defense.de/mnk/mnk_de.html. It is in German, and you'll need an on-line translator. He covers the period where jiu-jitsu was the inherited method from historical German police and military training in the early-to-mid 20th century, and then the introduction of karate in 1986. It reflects the trend in other countries at that time.

We see this type of embrace-reject dynamic today. All of a sudden in the 1980s the Israeli fighting techniques in Krav Maga became popular, and then BJJ, and then... Something new will come and capture the imagination of people, and when that happens it is brought into current doctrine and training. People are always looking for a magic formula as the solution. Once they become familiar with a tool, the new tool will have greater appeal because it is new.

Wounded Ronin
8/16/2016 10:44am,
Wounded Ronin, I suspect it was "the spirit of the age", or the zeitgeist as German historians would phrase it. The movement to include karate-style training into military hand-to-hand was somewhat universal in both the Communist bloc and the NATO countries at the time. The East Germans actually had North Korean trainers come to East Germany to help them integrate karate into their training plan in the early-1980s. If you look up Frank Pelny, he published GJOGSUL in 2005. It is about the induction of karate into the East German body of doctrine and training. He was an instructor in the East German People's Army at the time and was on of the men involved with the North Koreans.

Mr. Pelny has a page on military close combat in East Germany: http://www.saco-defense.de/mnk/mnk_de.html. It is in German, and you'll need an on-line translator. He covers the period where jiu-jitsu was the inherited method from historical German police and military training in the early-to-mid 20th century, and then the introduction of karate in 1986. It reflects the trend in other countries at that time.

We see this type of embrace-reject dynamic today. All of a sudden in the 1980s the Israeli fighting techniques in Krav Maga became popular, and then BJJ, and then... Something new will come and capture the imagination of people, and when that happens it is brought into current doctrine and training. People are always looking for a magic formula as the solution. Once they become familiar with a tool, the new tool will have greater appeal because it is new.

Thanks for your thoughts!