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1/17/2016 4:09am,
I dont know if I have posted in the right spot so I apologize if that is the case as this is my first post.
now,
staff fighting practise options?

I am just beginning to get into staff fighting, and I have made myself a staff that is about jo length (it is 140cm give or take), but I do not have any one to practise with and there is no one that teaches any form of staff fighting in my area or within a distance that I could drive to on a regular to semi regular base.

so does any body have any suggestions as to how I could practise on my own?

thank you

plasma
1/21/2016 4:56am,
You say you just started. Do you have an instructor? Or say Jo Length so I assume you are studying Japanese Bojutsu? Which Ryu-ha?

goodlun
1/21/2016 3:31pm,
Oh boy


staff fighting practise options?


Staff fighting to what end?



I am just beginning to get into staff fighting, and I have made myself a staff that is about jo length (it is 140cm give or take), but I do not have any one to practise with and there is no one that teaches any form of staff fighting in my area or within a distance that I could drive to on a regular to semi regular base.


So you have a stick, but no one to fight with or learn from?



so does any body have any suggestions as to how I could practise on my own?


All your going to be able to practice is swinging a stick around. This in it self is far from "staff fighting".
To fight you have to have people to well um fight with.
In general I would say its not a great idea to gather up your buddies and start hitting each other with sticks.

Permalost
1/21/2016 3:39pm,
Any kind of fighting will require a training partner of some sort. Learning real staff fighting will likely require some serious safety gear to spar safely. What's your end-game though? To compete? To be good at fighting with a stick?

Without a teacher and sparring partners, you can get good at twirling a staff for amusement and light exercise, but that's about it. A staff almost whispers to the person holding it to twirl it around smoothly, but that really has nothing to do with fighting.

I've won a few stickfighting tournaments using a staff, but I was actually sparring with it regularly at the time.

Permalost
1/21/2016 3:55pm,
My experience with staff fighting: I started my martial arts journey in choy li fut, and the more advanced levels had the staff, first as a form and some exercises and second as 2 person forms. The staff was generally held with the left hand at the very end and the right hand a shoulder's length down the staff, leaving most of the staff above the right hand. Basically how you would hold a spear to keep the opponent as far away as possible. This is common of Chinese staff (and spear). Attacks tend to be straight thrusts and forehand strikes high or low. Later, there was double-end staff, where you'd hit with either end, sliding the staff between the hands so the side striking was always the long side. Did lots of this stuff, but no real sparring with staves.

Fast forward several years: I'm learning eskrima in a garage, and we start learning bangkaw (Filipino spear). The approach is quite different- the bangkaw is basically held like a bayonet, with the left hand forward (towards the tip) and the right hand back, but with a good length of staff still trailing it. I was never a big fan of the bangkaw material compared to the Chinese staff. It didn't help that I did Chinese staff for years before learning bangkaw.

Eventually, we started training for stickfighting tournaments, which meant putting on eskrima headgear and gloves etc and doing matches. Some tournaments would allow for either double sticks or staff, and I usually went with the staff. But unlike the bangkaw material we actually worked on, I usually defaulted to Chinese staff style. My teacher encouraged it because I was actually good at it (in fact, at tournaments I was one of the only ones who did better with staff than double sticks). The bangkaw method just didn't have the reach and power of the Chinese style, yet the Chinese style didn't have the sparring that was needed to actually learn to make it work against a real person.

So basically, it took like a decade and two styles to get any good at staff fighting, and once I accomplished that, nobody really cared or asked me to teach them or anything, nor have I needed any staff fighting skills for self defense or primitive warfare or whatever.

Can you describe the staff you made? If its not rattan or waxwood, there's a good chance its too rigid/brittle to withstand fighting impact.

chaosexmachina
1/26/2016 5:34am,
Did you look for any HEMA schools? They usually teach quarterstaff and do sparring (you will need fencing headgear for that).

Ming Loyalist
1/26/2016 8:53am,
i don't think it's cool to fight the staff. they're just trying to make a living, maybe it's the owner that is the asshole.