PDA

View Full Version : Striking Strategy for a Street Fight



Pages : [1] 2 3 4

GreenCross
5/31/2015 6:12pm,
Okay so, maybe this isn't the best place to post this. But I figure its as good as any.

I've been watching a lot of street fights (mostly of World Star Hip Hop Fame....if you are not familiar, just YouTube "World Start Hip Hop Fights) and analyzing the quality of the striking.

As you can imagine, there is little to no skill. It's a lot of wild swings and haymakers. There are a few who, from what I can tell, have minimal boxing experience, but for the most part its haymakers, soccer kicks, poorly executed knees, bodylock takedows and underhook takedowns. You know, things a kid could figure out without any training.
(Granted, these dudes look like they are from hard scrabble neighborhoods and have been scrapping since they were kids).

Now, when I place myself, with my striking experience, in a street fight scenario ( 6 years of TKD, 3 years of Muay Thai, 3 years of Boxing) I still don't feel super confident that I could emerge victorious in an unavoidable situation. That may be because most of my focus has been on BJJ in the last year and I feel like my striking is getting rusty . But its also because of the wild card nature of street fights.

Fighting in a ring against a trained opponent, is wildly different than fighting an untrained brawler. That much should be obvious.

So here is my questions:

Imagine you are about to throw down outside of a bar. Things are heating up, this fight has become unavoidable. What is your strategy? Now this guy is your typical untrained brawler. He has a size advantage on you (maybe he is yoked, maybe he is fat). He is going to most likely shove you and they come charging at you with a flurry of wild swings, very erratic, weird angles and hard to predict. How do you handle the situation?

I feel like a guy with slower swings would be easy to bob and weave around until you can tag his chin when he is wide open after a whiffed haymaker. But if he is super quick and scrappy, even a trained fighter is going to have problems blocking the flurry. That is where I'm a bit stumped.

My personal solution would be to keep him at a distance with Teep Kicks and Leg kicks until he is hurting enough to go in for the finish or stuff him until I can grab the double neck tie and knee him into dreamland. But kicks become predictable caught.


What are you strategy and or opinions? How have you handled a street fight in the past?


**Note, I'm not advising anyone to engage in a street fight. I just feel like this thought has crossed most Martial Artist minds more than a few times. So its good to talk about. I also acknowledge that this conversation has likely happened before, so my apologies if I missed a similar thread.

big maclol
6/18/2015 1:34am,
Powerful leg kicks work pretty well in Street fights.

Some street fights can be avoided as well. As for Jiu Jitsu/grappling use it to stay standing and don't be afraid to slam someone on the concrete if it's a self defense situation

ghost55
6/18/2015 2:10am,
My answer is clinch knees and elbows. Lots and lots of elbows.

Evergrey
6/18/2015 2:27am,
Run away?
OK I am not very good at running either. SO!

Yell for the bouncer?
No? OK.

If I end up in a fight, things have gone majorly sideways.

If I feel I shouldn't break him: takedown with an armbar, if possible. Or knock the wind out of him while doing my best to protect my head. Maybe a nice nasty kick to the side branch of the sciatic nerve, too. Give him too much pain, hurt the fight out of him, if I can't just subdue him.

If I feel that I should break him for some reason and will be found innocent in a court of law: Kick him in the knee, hard. Take him down. Don't kick much above the waist, don't do anything fancy. Protect my head. If my life is in danger, punch him in the damn throat. Clinch'n'knee, sure, if I need to. Break him enough that the fight is gone from him, or he can't continue. Fight dirty as hell. That is not kumite. It's survival.

Haven't had to use any of my striking skills to defend myself against anyone since I started training, though. Don't go to bars, don't go out and get drunk, don't pound my chest at people, don't get into stupid pointless sportsball arguments, etc, etc.

You know, I mean really, the best way to survive a fight like that intact is to not be in the fight if you can help it.

Mr. Machette
6/18/2015 2:53am,
In my humble experience the John Kreese method is a fair opener.

"Strike first. Strike hard. No mercy."

To which I would ad my own personal addendum; "aim low".

Azatdawn
6/18/2015 3:12am,
What are you strategy and or opinions?

This video holds all the answers:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mosX7L25HV8

baby_cart
6/18/2015 6:11am,
1. Ask yourself: is this fight worth bleeding for? Stupid reasons to fight makes for a whole lot of headaches before and after.

2. Control the range. If you deem it stupid to fight, back off. If you think the fight is worth it, don't close distance hastily. Wrestling takedowns, clinching and other grappling choices are only to be used when:

a. you are reasonably sure that there are on weapons, makeshift or otherwise.
b. you have the elements of BOTH numbers and surprise, and you don't want to injure the perp too badly.

Remember, range is time. Less range, less time to react.

3. Mess up the other guy's means of controlling the range. The best thing I learned from TKD was Bruce Lee's stomp to the lead leg/knee. It saved me from a mugging/shanking.

If it was a bar situation, use barriering. Maneuver tables and chairs into his path, making sure that when he closes the distance, it will be on YOUR terms.

4. Use the thing that is absent in prizefighting/ fighting sports: verbal and vocal diversions. That first strike advantage is greatly enhanced when they are thinking over your words. However, there is a catch:

In many videos, the one who gets KTFO is the one who was posturing and talking smack before the first punch flew. Don't be too absorbed in words, either his or yours. It's just a distraction, a feint, similar with jab fakes and such. They're not the pudding.



That all said, #2 is most important. I repeat, MOST IMPORTANT.

Dave Reslo
6/18/2015 6:37am,
Well I guess I would beat the other guy up, hope this helps.







Seriously, drunk people aren't as good at fighting so whichever one of you is most drunk is at a disadvantage. There is not much chance you can "bob and weave" in a crowded area with a gut full of cheap vodka. Stay standing and try and stop the other guy from standing in whatever way comes most naturally to you over the five-twenty seconds that your fight might last. Given your experience you would probably be fine. Also, it's weird to

YouTube "World Start Hip Hop Fights)
when you can see them all at worldstarhiphop.com

Devil
6/18/2015 9:12am,
"Strike first. Strike hard. No mercy."


That is precisely the answer I was going to give and I don't mean it jokingly. The time to strike in a street fight is the very instant you know there's going to be a fight. You have to be ready to evaluate the situation honestly. You can't hesitate because you're scared of the guy. When you know there's going to be a fight, you strike immediately. If you're not going to do that, you should run.

Your attack should be simple. I don't agree with trying to hit small moving targets, like kicking someone in the knee. And it's not a fucking boxing match either. There's nothing wrong with counterpunching but you should be headhunting. You should be looking for the knockout. You should treat the situation like you would treat your opponent in an MMA fight if he was hurt and you knew you could put him away. Heels down, throwing hard punches until he drops. If at any time you feel yourself to be in a disadvantageous position (like taking heavy shots) you need to create some space, reset and attack again or get the **** out of there.

Locu5
6/18/2015 9:13am,
judo your life so you aren't in situations where random bar fights break out.

goodlun
6/18/2015 9:13am,
My answer is clinch knees and elbows. Lots and lots of elbows.

Bad answer, clinching in a street fight opens you up to the good old sneak attack from a knife.

Where as leg kicks help you keep your distance beats down your opponent and allows you to run away.
Inside leg kicks all day long every day for a street fight.

bombom
6/18/2015 9:28am,
You're from Wisconsin, just hit him with a cow.

Seriously though, just remember this. Never let a ************ get chest to chest with you. As mentioned before, control the range, shove him if he gets close.

If he persists, lay him out. You already know how. If you think there are holes in your game, work to close them.

If you think it would be good to be stronger, start lifting.

When you go out, go out with friends. If you don't have friends, make some. Stay out of trashy places, trashy people are stupid and not worth associating with.

bombom
6/18/2015 9:32am,
That is precisely the answer I was going to give and I don't mean it jokingly. The time to strike in a street fight is the very instant you know there's going to be a fight. You have to be ready to evaluate the situation honestly. You can't hesitate because you're scared of the guy. When you know there's going to be a fight, you strike immediately. If you're not going to do that, you should run.

Your attack should be simple. I don't agree with trying to hit small moving targets, like kicking someone in the knee. And it's not a fucking boxing match either. There's nothing wrong with counterpunching but you should be headhunting. You should be looking for the knockout. You should treat the situation like you would treat your opponent in an MMA fight if he was hurt and you knew you could put him away. Heels down, throwing hard punches until he drops. If at any time you feel yourself to be in a disadvantageous position (like taking heavy shots) you need to create some space, reset and attack again or get the **** out of there.

Fucking Devil, always writing gooder **** than me.

OP, what he wrote is golden stuff. Take it to heart. Street fights are dumb, and easily avoided most times. But if ************ won't let you walk away, get to work.

goodlun
6/18/2015 10:05am,
I've been watching a lot of street fights (mostly of World Star Hip Hop Fame....if you are not familiar, just YouTube "World Start Hip Hop Fights) and analyzing the quality of the striking.
95% of the time its complete ****



(Granted, these dudes look like they are from hard scrabble neighborhoods and have been scrapping since they were kids).

That doesn't == to skill, a lot of that just comes down to toughness and physical capability.
They still tend to lack the skill set of say someone that studies boxing.



But its also because of the wild card nature of street fights.

Street fights are not that "wild" the human body can only move in so many ways. The only thing wild about it is, that they may have a weapon, and that their friends may step in.



Fighting in a ring against a trained opponent, is wildly different than fighting an untrained brawler. That much should be obvious.

Yes but you the gym you train at should have a revolving door of new people coming in to give this fighting thing a try. They fight like **** 99% of the time. Once again not being trained offers little to no advantage. Throwing a punch improperly isn't going to help them in any way.



I feel like a guy with slower swings would be easy to bob and weave around until you can tag his chin when he is wide open after a whiffed haymaker. But if he is super quick and scrappy, even a trained fighter is going to have problems blocking the flurry. That is where I'm a bit stumped.

How do you deal with fast aggressive fighters in your gym?



My personal solution would be to keep him at a distance with Teep Kicks and Leg kicks until he is hurting enough to go in for the finish or stuff him until I can grab the double neck tie and knee him into dreamland. But kicks become predictable caught.

Most people who are not training can't sit there and eat leg kicks, you would be surprised at how quickly someone is going to go down, and you can't really "catch" a leg kick. There is a reason you "check" leg kicks.

Dave Reslo
6/18/2015 10:51am,
GreenCross your lack of confidence seems really odd.

They almost certainly won't be "super quick" compared to you because they are untrained and uncoordinated. They won't be hitting you very hard with their "flurry of wild swings at weird angles" because these are largely arm punches from angles the body can't produce much power from. The worst that can happen (aside from getting stabbed or glassed or whatever) is that you get in a fight with someone bigger than you and it turns out they aren't an "untrained brawler" after all.

Maybe you can post a particular video where someone does something you think might be hard to handle?

Devil
6/18/2015 10:57am,
GreenCross your lack of confidence seems really odd.

They almost certainly won't be "super quick" compared to you because they are untrained and uncoordinated. They won't be hitting you very hard with their "flurry of wild swings at weird angles" because these are largely arm punches from angles the body can't produce much power from. The worst that can happen (aside from getting stabbed or glassed or whatever) is that you get in a fight with someone bigger than you and it turns out they aren't an "untrained brawler" after all.

Maybe you can post a particular video where someone does something you think might be hard to handle?

It's very likely that an attacker will be bigger and stronger than you. And the worst thing that could happen is that you could die. It's a bad idea to dismiss the danger posed by other humans who want to hurt you.