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chaosexmachina
5/06/2004 3:01am,
Given the increasing popularity (K-1) and the multitude of styles competing (Muay Thai, American Kickboxing, Kyokushin, Sanshou and even WTF TKD (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?s=&postid=301200#post301200)) why isn't kickboxing in the Olympics? I think there's enough kickboxers worldwide for such an event to be included. It would be fairer to all the standup styles to include all of these martial arts and not just TKD pointfighting.

And besides... it's another step towards getting pankration back in the Olympics. Hahah.

SLJ
5/06/2004 3:10am,
I guess it's not popular enough.

Not even golf's in it.

chaosexmachina
5/06/2004 3:13am,
That's true. But in my opinion golf shouldn't REALLY be in the Olympics. But I wouldn't freak out if it were. I DID freak out when I heard the card game bridge had become an Olympic event...

SLJ
5/06/2004 3:19am,
Exactly, there are some strange things in it.

I think golf should be in, and kickboxing.

panda
5/06/2004 3:24am,
from what i understand for the 2008 olympics they tried to push in complete format of wushu in, with both forms (taolu) and sparring (sanshou), but the olympics committee said thats san shou isn't different enough from events like boxing, taekwondo, and wrestling, also there's the issue of needing a minimum number of nations participating in the sport (for both men and women divisions) to get olympic recognition, if the sports arent popular enough to field national teams then it wont be in the olympics

liuzg150181
5/06/2004 3:24am,
Supports kickboxing in the Olympics~~~

SARS_Attacks
5/06/2004 3:26am,
Originally posted by chaosexmachina
That's true. But in my opinion golf shouldn't REALLY be in the Olympics. But I wouldn't freak out if it were. I DID freak out when I heard the card game bridge had become an Olympic event...

What peeved me was the fact that they would rather televise "Olympic ballroom dancing" than tae kwon do....I had to buy a god damn tape to see those matches.

liuzg150181
5/06/2004 3:29am,
Originally posted by SARS_Attacks
What peeved me was the fact that they would rather televise "Olympic ballroom dancing" than tae kwon do....I had to buy a god damn tape to see those matches.
Those Olympics committees are made up of pussies~~~

chaosexmachina
5/06/2004 3:34am,
Originally posted by panda
from what i understand for the 2008 olympics they tried to push in complete format of wushu in, with both forms (taolu) and sparring (sanshou), but the olympics committee said thats san shou isn't different enough from events like boxing, taekwondo, and wrestling, also there's the issue of needing a minimum number of nations participating in the sport (for both men and women divisions) to get olympic recognition, if the sports arent popular enough to field national teams then it wont be in the olympics

Well ****... If that's the case then judo is WAY too similar to wrestling to be in the Olympics. Sheesh. The only thing remotely close to sanshou on that list is boxing and that's because it's full contact. Aren't there enough practioners within all those styles I mentioned?

panda
5/06/2004 3:46am,
tru, but olympics people are not that in touch with tthe differences between combat sports. The big issue though it's popularity, you need something like 50 or 70 nations that have a sports body governing to get recognized, and all those styles would not meet this requirement in terms of having a female division

chaosexmachina
5/06/2004 4:30am,
Isn't that the point of pushing a game in the Olympics? To INFORM the commitee? Keep them in touch? Or are they too powerful and too far up their own asses?

Greese
5/06/2004 6:10am,
Originally posted by chaosexmachina
Well ****... If that's the case then judo is WAY too similar to wrestling to be in the Olympics. Sheesh. The only thing remotely close to sanshou on that list is boxing and that's because it's full contact. Aren't there enough practioners within all those styles I mentioned?
The problem is that Judo world wide is much bigger than wrestling by far.

CaptShady
5/06/2004 7:35am,
Originally posted by panda
also there's the issue of needing a minimum number of nations participating in the sport (for both men and women divisions) to get olympic recognition, if the sports arent popular enough to field national teams then it wont be in the olympics


Originally posted by greese1
The problem is that Judo world wide is much bigger than wrestling by far.

These are the issues that some people just ignore or won't listen to. It could be the most popular sport in YOUR nation, but unless it's 1) unisexual and 2) done globally it's NOT going to end up in the olympics. There has to be governing bodies in each nation of said sport .. in a specific number of countries in order for it to even be considered by the Olympic committee. Bowling isn't an olympic sport, golf (as mentioned), American Football, the list goes on.

jubei33
5/06/2004 7:50am,
so wushu's definitely not going to be in beijing next time? I knew a lot of people were training hard for that one. some of my friends were going to try out for the US team as I recall.....
as for teams, I know that most european nations have a semi national team for wushu. some of the teams from spain do well against the chinese teams, but in the end the chinese always seem to dominate...maybe thats what its really about: dont want to put something in that a particular nation will dominate..still dissapointing

CaptShady
5/06/2004 7:58am,
Wushu Goes for Olympics

If curling and synchronized swimming qualify as Olympic sports, then wushu, Chinese martial arts that are lethal, disciplined, poetic, historic and deeply rooted in culture, should be adopted as well. The International Wushu Federation recently held a program for overseas instructors in Shanghai, hoping that their lobbying efforts will help win the ancient sport a place in the Olympics.
Wushu, as the ancient Chinese martial arts are known, first emerged as primitive forms of self-defense. After thousands of years of refinement, wushu, in its various forms and disciplines, is practiced the world over by people of all ages.

The most significant indication of its global stature was its recognition in February by the International Olympic Committee. The next step, being undertaken by the International Wushu Federation, is to make wushu an Olympic sport -- ideally, in time for the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

Of wushu's 31 categories, eight are being proposed for the Olympics -- four for men and four for women, says Li Yapei, an aide to the president of the IWF.

The enormous popularity and growing enthusiasm for wushu worldwide is almost certain to assure its adoption as an Olympic event, Li adds.

In China and overseas, foreigners participate in wushu competitions, like Gololobov Mikhail. At a recent kungfu training course, his brown hair and blue eyes seem a tad out-of-place -- like seeing a bushman in a loin cloth at an IT convention. But his broadsword play was masterly, and erased any doubt that the fellow had stumbled into the wrong building.

"Wushu is beautiful," says Mikhail, a member of National Wushu Federation of Russia. "I enjoy the movements and the way it makes my body feel."

And he isn't alone. About 81 overseas wushu coaches and students gathered in Shanghai earlier this month for the International Wushu Coach Training Course.

The object of the course was to introduce wushu coaches to a set of five new "taolu" (routines) which will be adopted in all international wushu competitions later this year, in preparation for next year's 7th Wushu World Championships in Macau.

Ng Siu Ching, 33, gold medallist at the 1999 Fifth Wushu World Championships, says that kungfu movies "have helped to popularize the sport abroad."

Leopoldo Castro Cruz, a 44-year-old lawyer and wushu coach from Mexico, who also attended the training course, believes the Olympics will benefit from wushu -- and vice versa. "Once wushu enters the Olympics, it will certainly become more popular -- at least as popular as taekwondo," he predicts, referring to the Korean martial art that primarily uses kicks.

Many foreign wushu students say language is a major stumbling block to learning wushu. Markus Heilmann, a member of the German national wushu team, says the best Chinese wushu teachers usually don't speak English. "Competent teachers who can speak English are extremely rare," he says, "and Chinese is a difficult language for Europeans to learn."

Ng, from Hong Kong, agrees. "Using more English would definitely help it (wushu) global accepted faster," she says.

The limited amount of information on wushu available overseas is another obstacle.

Kristaps Simanis, from Latvia, says that when he was learning wushu, he only had three videotapes of Chinese wushu tournaments. "All I could do was to imitate the movements on the tapes. If I did them incorrectly, I didn't know," he says.

The culture of wushu -- which, of course, is rooted in Chinese culture -- poses yet another problem.

"In China, your wushu teacher is your master -- 'shifu' -- and commands the respect that all teachers receive in China. The master passes on the techniques and skills and the spirit of wushu and the way of life," says Heilmann, 29. "It's completely different from a Western teacher-student relationship. We think students are equal to the teacher because it's the students who are paying, and that gives us a right to decide how -- and what -- we learn. All we want to learn are the skills and the movements. Yet without a profound understanding of the spirit of wushu, you can't possibly learn real martial art."

Due to the arduousness process of learning wushu there is a high attrition rate. Hundreds of people begin wushu training in Latvia every year, but only a few remain after one or two years. "Most give up because they can't endure the training," says Simanis.

The 26-year-old kungfu fan also calls for better regulations in the wushu world. "There is a ranking system in taekwondo, where one's class is identified by his waistband. But wushu doesn't have a similar system. If someone claims he is a master in Latvia, people will probably believe him, even if he's not," he points out. "There's just no way of knowing."

Yet foreign wushu practitioners maintain that the difficulties are not insurmountable. As Hailmann says: "Once wushu enters the Olympics, it will become more influential in the world. More people will understand wushu, which will spur its rapid development worldwide."

CaptShady
5/06/2004 8:03am,
The IWUF's application for Chinese Martial Arts to be recognised by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) was prepared in Hong Kong in November 1998. The IWUF was accepted into membership of the General Assembly for International Sports Federations (GAISF) in 1995, which is the first step. The second step to reach the criteria set by the IOC is to have Wushu represented in a minimum of 73 countries, spanning 4 continents.

At the 4th World Wushu Championships and Congress held in Italy 1997, it was reported that the IWUF have 78 countries in membership, spanning all continents (Asia, North America, South America, Europe, Africa and Oceanic States). Mr Ray Smith and Peter Warr met the Sports Minister of China, Mr. Wu Shaozu, who is also President of the IWUF and Chinese Olympic Committee, to prepare the final step; the letter of Application to the IOC of which Mr Smith had a great input. The application will be considered at a IOC meeting in early 1999. We have to wait for a final decision that Chinese Martial Arts will become recognised as an Olympic Sport.

International Wushu Federation (IWUF) received provisional recognition by the olympic committee as an International Recognised Federation.