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DanDavis
4/19/2004 12:41pm,
I might be counting my chickens before they're hatched on this one, but here goes....

I may be hired to teach a non-credit 10-week tai chi course through the local school board. I wouldn't have to invest any money into it and would work for a decent hourly rate (not much more than what I make at my day job). However, I have trouble swallowing the idea of the crowd I'd be dealing with. I think I could tolerate the people who insist on performing tai chi in a chair (even though they're not handicapped). The ones I'm concerned with are those who leave these 10-week courses or even 3-hour seminars as "experts" thinking they're ready to teach. I can't filter out who I teach because I'm not the one they're paying. I'm considering a couple of options and I'm looking for some direction. I was thinking that if I do this, I should have the participants sign an agreement stating that if they wish to teach this form, they cannot mention me as their instructor without my written consent. I think it sounds a little arrogant, but at least I avoid getting my name dragged in the mud and I'm not affecting someone else's livelihood. I won a silver medal for this form at an international competition, in case you're wondering why I'm so concerned. The other option would be to pay rent somewhere else and filter my enrollment, which could be a big financial risk.

Any advice?

Colin
4/19/2004 12:53pm,
Hmm.. sounds like a pre-nuptial agreement.
I wouldn't bother. If you don't certify them as instructors, it can't come back to you if they try to teach people. It depends on you. Are you confident in your ability to teach, and find joy in imparting knowledge, fucking go for it.
If you answered no to either of the above.. Forget teaching. It's obviously not for you.
All teachers of MA (myself included) will find the occasional dickhead that they have to teach.. don't worry about it. You can influence but not change people. Just be clear with them about what they can reasonably expect to get out of your course. You can't do more than that.

Peter H.
4/19/2004 3:42pm,
Both me and my father get offers to go places and teach ona fairly regular basis. One of our rules is if we wouldn't want our names attached to the group, we don't do it. It sounds about the same here. If you wouldn't want these people saying they learned from you and you don't want to tell people you taught there, then I wouldn't do it.

I also always insist on having the final say on who I teach, even when I do courses for the city and what not.

Ka-Bar
4/19/2004 3:54pm,
I'm sure the city has a policy of allowing you to dismiss those people who would disrupt the learning process and those who would use what you teach fraudulently or in a matter that may harm themselves or others.

DanDavis
4/20/2004 8:14am,
Originally posted by Ka-Bar
I'm sure the city has a policy of allowing you to dismiss those people who would disrupt the learning process and those who would use what you teach fraudulently or in a matter that may harm themselves or others.

Actually, they have one such fraud already teaching for them. From what others have told me, this guy went to a seminar and began teaching - poorly - what he had learned from it shortly afterward. The school board actually wants to avoid the possibility of me stepping on his toes. They told me I couldn't teach unless it was a style he's not familiar with.

The reasons I first started looking in to doing this were that I think I've earned the "qualified" status when I faired well in international competition and when I heard about the current local tai chi instructors' backgrounds. A lot of them go to these 3 or 4 hour seminars that David Dorian Ross puts on and get certified. I also need money for the costs involved in entering the high caliber martial arts competitions. I don't who to turn to for sponsorship. I figure the next best way to come up with the money is to work for it.

This would be my first professional teaching experience. I don't want to tarnish my reputation as soon as I get my foot in the door.

inde
4/20/2004 11:26am,
Originally posted by DanDavis
The reasons I first started looking in to doing this were that I think I've earned the "qualified" status when I faired well in international competition

This would be my first professional teaching experience. I don't want to tarnish my reputation as soon as I get my foot in the door.

A great preformance at an international competition is an admirable accomplishment, but it doesn't neccesarily translate into an effective teacher. This is your first pro teching experience, have you taught before? I think you should go for the gig as it is. The students that you are worried about usually weed themselves out if you make everyone work hard enough. Every teacher encounters students who later prove to be dipshits. If you are able to motivate your students, and effectively communicate your lessons, people will recognize the results in the majority of your students.

shironinja
4/20/2004 12:02pm,
You think too much of yourself and too little of your students.

You didn't even win the GOLD medal!!!! haw haw.

DanDavis
4/20/2004 12:41pm,
Originally posted by shironinja
You think too much of yourself and too little of your students.

You didn't even win the GOLD medal!!!! haw haw.

LOL! I take it you have? Outside the Special Olympics?

KhorneliusPraxx
4/20/2004 12:51pm,
Originally posted by DanDavis
I may be hired to teach a non-credit 10-week tai chi course through the local school board.

Will it be full contact Tai Chi?:p

DanDavis
4/20/2004 2:41pm,
Originally posted by KhorneliusPraxx
Will it be full contact Tai Chi?:p

Nah. It's a tai chi broadsword form. I'd love to teach/practice REAL tai chi, applications and all. I just can't find anyone with the same interest though. :(