PDA

View Full Version : Hi Folks - I'm New



mobiledevice
3/21/2012 7:22pm,
Hello

I'm obviously new here, and I have some questions about independent progression. Right now, joining a gym isn't in my budget because I'm saving for a wedding. Though, I am definitely looking at joining one after my honeymoon.

Here's my background.

Took "Karate" at the youth center in town when I was in second grade. I got a yellow belt before my mom got scared that this would turn me violent and pulled me out of the class.

A friend of mine with more than 16 years of training in Muay Thai/Kali/Escrima was teaching me some stuff last year. (The guy was legit good. Used to do tournaments and amateur bouts). We were advancing pretty quickly, and then I ruptured my Achilles tendon - clean in half - while doing kick combos. I had surgery, and my recovery PT lasted about 8 months. In the mean time, that friend moved back to his home town across the country, and I have this terrible itch to get back into MMA. My goals are both self defense and fitness (also fun).

To that end, I bought some cheap pads at Big 5 (like $50 total for two focus mitts and a Thai pad). I know that they're crap pads, but for now, they work fine. I'm working with two friends of mine on the very basics of Muay Thai - footwork, jab, cross, hook, uppercut, elbows, knees, combo basics. No kicks yet, as (1) my partners are still very new to any kind of MA, and (2) my fiancee would kill me if I re-ruptured my tendon.


So...

I have a lot of questions, obviously.

1) First, is this something I shouldn't be doing? I.e., am I just asking for one of us to get seriously hurt? We're taking things slowly and focusing on the basics, so I'm not having them do arm-bars or other risky moves on me or each other. But I wonder if there are things I don't know about punching that might be important to know. I want to be as safe as possible while doing this. Are there good resources for this kind of MA safety that I can find online?

2) My personal training to stay ahead of my 'students' (if you can call them that) has been mostly based on the videos below. The guy doing the instruction in the video is the former partner of my friend's trainer, so the style is identical to what I was taught.

Unarmed
YOUTUBEDOTCOM/watch?v=68pNX7YkbIM

Armed
YOUTUBEDOTCOM/watch?v=1i2caVKXEAk

(had to post like that because they won't let me post links yet)

Am I wrong in thinking that this is a pretty legit and straightforward approach to building a basic set of techniques to use in a fight situation?

3) Are there other good videos for teaching simple, effective techniques out there? I see a ton of crap on youtube, and I just don't want to put in a bunch of time and effort learning bad techniques and ideas. I also really don't want to teach garbage to my friends.

4) Anyone know of any really good drills or an overall method for a couple dudes working to help each other become proficient at MMA?

5) What am I missing here? Am I on the right track? Or am I asking for injuries and bad technique?


Thanks.

I'm sure I'll have more questions eventually. I've only been 'teaching' my friends for a couple weeks. But they're already helping me tighten up my combos and body movement. And I've seen a ton of progress in both of my friends.

Matt Phillips
3/21/2012 8:21pm,
Welcome! I'm really glad you have the enthusiasm to keep training after a tough injury. I do want to say, though, that you guys should be training under the supervision of a qualified instructor. Coincidentally, we had a impromptu training session at my house today where my son (a 2 stripe white belt) wanted to give someone a BJJ lesson. Before he was allowed to, I had to go get a friend of mine who holds teaching rank in that style to sit on the couch and watch the session. It's not safe or even proper to train people by yourself, to train under an uncertified person, or to train with a group of fellow beginners.

If you are literally in the middle of nowhere, there are a very few well organized video based courses I might recommend, but only if you literally have no access to in person training.

May I ask where you are located? We might be able to steer you to something more worthy of your efforts ;)

mobiledevice
3/21/2012 11:32pm,
Thanks for the reply. I understand that for something like BJJ, messing up is reeeeally dangerous. Is it true to the same degree for really basic punches and elbows? We're not doing anything ridiculous.

Also, what do you mean by certified? I've been reading about finding a martial arts studio, but right now it's just not practical in terms of either time or money. It's going to have to wait for a few months. I'm in Newport Beach, CA. So there are Karate/TKD/Krav Maga places on every corner of not just this city, but all the neighboring ones as well.

Matt Phillips
3/22/2012 7:21am,
There are 3 different issues here: the first is that self-training any martial art increases your chances of getting hurt (or hurting someone else), the second is that self-training any martial art is very likely to set you backwards when you start training in a regular program because you are logging hours ingraining uncorrected mistakes; the third issue is that it is inappropriate to take responsibility for potentially inflicting the first and second issues on others, if you are lacking significant experience yourself.

I'd advise your group to focus on stretching, skipping rope, push ups and running, until you have the means and opportunity to train at a legit club.

Look around for Boxing and Judo programs because these can be a lot cheaper than you might think ;)

jnp
3/22/2012 8:00am,
Welcome to Bullshido mobiledevice.


There are 3 different issues here: the first is that self-training any martial art increases your chances of getting hurt (or hurting someone else), the second is that self-training any martial art is very likely to set you backwards when you start training in a regular program because you are logging hours ingraining uncorrected mistakes; the third issue is that it is inappropriate to take responsibility for potentially inflicting the first and second issues on others, if you are lacking significant experience yourself.

I'd advise your group to focus on stretching, skipping rope, push ups and running, until you have the means and opportunity to train at a legit club.

Look around for Boxing and Judo programs because these can be a lot cheaper than you might think ;)
This is an excellent summary of why you should not be teaching. In the gym or dojo, almost everyone avoids partnering up new people with other new people. The reason, injuries occur quite frequently when this happens.

Boxing and Judo are extremely affordable compared to most other martial arts. They also teach rock solid skills, and they are very few pretenders teaching in these disciplines.

mobiledevice
3/23/2012 4:02pm,
Thanks for the advice and wisdom. I appreciate it. I'll look into gyms in my area.

Kengashui
3/25/2012 6:45pm,
MP and Jnp both made great points

you mentioned that you took karate earlier
if you're interested in it kyokushin karate is a great striking art, as long as they don't go overboard with the body hardening.

muay thai gyms would probably be much easier to find though, and since you already have more experience in that style, I'd suggest taking that.

also if you can buy a set of dumbbells you can do a lot of basic excercises that work most parts of the body

www.dumbbell-exercises.com/
this site has a list of exercises you can do with them.
weight lifting is a great way to build and tone muscle, but you're also going to want to incorporate cardio into your workout, for endurance purposes

jump rope and running are good for this as MP said, I prefer biking and jumping jacks myself

as for picking which gym is best for you, the best thing you can do is sit in on a session for free (if they make you pay just to sit in once it's most likely a sham anyway and should be avoided). Some things you want to keep in mind when reviewing a school: Does it train alive? By alive we mean are the techniques drilled against resisting opponents, etc. Is it full contact sparring? You usually want to stay away from dojos that use soft, or point sparring, because it doesn't really teach you how to deal with damage recieved from an attack, and it's a more realistic fight scenario. Lastly, you may want to inquire as to the instructor's qualification, lineage, etc., though if the first two questions are addressed you usually won't have to look to deeply into it to know what you're getting.

Whooo! hope I covered everything correctly, I'm still a noob myself, and am going to start training muay thai this summer, my first real MA. glad to meet you and welcome to Bullshido

KiwiPhil889
3/26/2012 12:03am,
Just a word of caution. The archilles injury sounds nasty!!. I realise you have rehabbed from it but its in an area that you will be putting alot of stress on,even when training correctly.Thing is,its not just kicking thats going to stress it.

Punches start at your feet,e.g turning on a cross.Pivoting the foot on kicks, and skipping in general are going to put extra stresses on there,so be careful or you will end up going backwards.

mobiledevice
3/26/2012 12:05pm,
Thanks for the additional help, kenga.

Kiwiphil, I had noticed the major use of the right Achilles tendon before I ruptured it. Muay Thai basically uses the right Achilles to anchor and/or power everything. I make sure to stretch before and after all physical activity, and I ice down the tendon after workouts.

My rupture was pretty much a fluke of wet grass. I brought my right leg back from one of those kicks muay thai is famous for and I lost my balance. My right leg slid backwards, hyperextending the tendon as the ball of my foot stayed firmly on the grass. I tried to kick again while the foot was still sliding. The act of trying to kick from a hyperextended position just literally ripped the tendon in half. It was a nasty injury and a long recovery, so I'm very interested in safety at this point.