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View Full Version : Seeking recommendations for Long Beach/Southern Los Angeles classes



zeitgueist
1/19/2012 12:27am,
I understand this is vague, I'm still trying to put together what I'm looking for out of martial arts and posting here helps me organize my thoughts, as well as casts a good net.

My fiancee and I are interested in taking a class in some sort of martial art. We have some very basic guidelines:

1) Fitness - She's pretty fit, I'm out of shape, I'm looking to get better and she's looking to maintain...however I do understand that nearly any martial art can count as exercise, including warmups.

2) Fighting - I'm not looking to be a big badass. If I ever get into a fight it's mostly going to be me doing what it takes to get away.

3) Something that is interesting to learn. Yes, this is my vaguest requirement of the three...I've taken a style of Kung Fu before and I thought it was fun, but I realize that there are a lot of traditions and other stuff wrapped up in Kung Fu teaching so one has to be careful about mysticism and such. Maybe having a good teacher makes the style irrelevant?

Being where I am in California gives me a lot of different options so I'm looking to narrow down my choices, and there's such a large amount of people in the area that I might possibly get some specific recs.

Omega Supreme
1/19/2012 12:35am,
How about Signal Hill?

Omega Supreme
1/19/2012 12:45am,
Well in case that's fine, I had a student end up here and he said it was really good:

http://360kravmaga.com/

zeitgueist
1/19/2012 1:39am,
That's actually a great suggestion! That is very near to me, and they're apparently doing open houses every Thursday in January. Anything in particular he liked?

For reference any other martial art I've ever taken was such a basic beginner course so as not to count, so I'm coming at it as a complete newbie.

Omega Supreme
1/19/2012 10:23am,
Nothing specific. I get a lot of people who move away and have a hard time finding a school because they're always trying to compare it where they came from (Works in reverse too). I figured it would be a good fit because of your first two criteria.

zeitgueist
1/19/2012 10:46am,
Thank you very much, I'll check it out.

I've done some searching on the forum and also found what is apparently a pretty reputable Judo school(http://www.ockjudo.com/). It's a bit farther(10mi vs 5mi) but that's not a huge deal. Any thoughts on that?

Omega Supreme
1/19/2012 10:53am,
You won't know until you try. I tell people if they're going to do something like Judo, though, you should try total immersion if you want to fully appreciate it.

PizDoff
1/19/2012 11:23am,
Welcome to the site, you seem to have a good head on your shoulders. Check out what Omega recommended!


Check out this article

Finding a good martial arts school
http://www.bullshido.org/Finding_a_good_martial_arts_school
but don't over analyze it. You still need to visit the school in person to see what it is like.

Let us know how it goes

judojeff
1/19/2012 11:45am,
Personally I would point you in the judo direction, partially because I am biased, but mainly because I think it will fit all our criteria very well.

There will be a period of time where you are just learning to fall correctly and some basic throws and that is totally normal, plus depending how out of shape you are just falling down and getting back up for an hour or more can get a sweat going hahaha.

Once they start you doing some good randori (the judo equivalent of sparring) that's when you can get a great work out. This also ties into your second goal of self defense. When judo was created a strong emphasis was put on working your techniques against an actively resisting partner who was trying to throw you at the same time (called training with "aliveness"). This is one of the better ways to get a feel for what a technique might feel like in a so called "street scenario". Also worth mentioning is that as a whole judo people are the hardest to throw with judo, so if you can get a move to work on them then its likely it will work on most others.

Personally I think judo is fun to learn, the randori brings in some excitement and works as a gauge to see how you have improved. But whats fun for you may not be fun for me and vice versa. The good thing about judo is that it kinda has some of the trappings that you find in other arts (the bowing, Japanese terms, etc.) but is very much rooted in pressure testing your skills, something that some other arts lack. So if your in to the more mystical side of things theres some of that and if your into the more realistic stuff theirs that to.

Man this post turned out way longer then expected, sorry about that. Try some different things out and do the one that feels like the best fit for you.

zeitgueist
1/19/2012 1:20pm,
There will be a period of time where you are just learning to fall correctly and some basic throws and that is totally normal, plus depending how out of shape you are just falling down and getting back up for an hour or more can get a sweat going hahaha.


I am entirely this level of out of shape. But I am planning on taking a class as only part of a fitness regimen including dieting and weight training. Also, I take some dance too.


Thanks for your post!