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1MoreBeer
12/11/2011 4:34pm,
Due to the advise of my other thread I joined a BJJ school.

Whats the best striking art to compliment BJJ?

shanesorensen89
12/11/2011 4:44pm,
I would personally recommend doing muay thai if it is available. Are you looking to do MMA or just looking to be well rounded in a self defense situation?

1MoreBeer
12/11/2011 4:52pm,
ya there is a muay thai gym in my area thats good, also a boxing there is no MMA gym. i was looking to be more well rounded in a self defense type situation as I doubt I will ever be able to fight in an MMA match even though I would like to try one.

beardedtaco
12/11/2011 5:23pm,
You won't know if you don't try. Good luck and enjoy the journey.

MMAMickey
12/11/2011 6:48pm,
Muay Thai and boxing are both solid options. If price is a limit, then boxing will probably be cheaper.

You'll also learn some basic skills such as footwork and head movement to a much higher standard in boxing; whereas Muay Thai will generally give you the more well rounded striking skill set.

Omega Supreme
12/11/2011 7:00pm,
Dutch Kickboxing.

td82394
12/11/2011 8:10pm,
For the street? Muay Thai because most guys aren't familiar with kicks. MMA, boxing because of the takedown.

Tom Kagan
12/11/2011 10:42pm,
i was looking to be more well rounded in a self defense type situation

If you're not on the track team as a sprinter, hurdler, or steeplechaser, playing American football as a running back, tight end, or wide receiver, or on a rugby squad, you're LARPing self-defense by adding a striking art to your grappling, not rounding it out. I'm not joking.

You're a beginner. Just have fun. If getting repeatedly hit in the head sounds like more fun than getting thrown, choked, and hyperextended, then take up a striking art in lieu of grappling. Otherwise, stick to only one thing at a time at which you are bad.

gregaquaman
12/11/2011 11:07pm,
If you're not on the track team as a sprinter, hurdler, or steeplechaser, playing American football as a running back, tight end, or wide receiver, or on a rugby squad, you're LARPing self-defense by adding a striking art to your grappling, not rounding it out. I'm not joking.

You're a beginner. Just have fun. If getting repeatedly hit in the head sounds like more fun than getting thrown, choked, and hyperextended, then take up a striking art in lieu of grappling. Otherwise, stick to only one thing at a time at which you are bad.

That is a pretty big call.

What is your reasoning behind that?

MMAMickey
12/12/2011 3:57am,
For the street? Muay Thai because most guys aren't familiar with kicks. MMA, boxing because of the takedown.

'the street' isn't some place where all the bad people in the world gather to fight - it is always a poor event to prepare for.

That being said, grappling is probably better for violent self-defence situations than striking from an efficiency and legal perspective. As a student I've come across a few situations where drunk people could cause a **** storm, and as of yet I've never found one where striking would have been the better option; being able to control somebody is more effective than being able to pound them into liquid form. Also, whether you were defending yourself or not, if the Police turn up and see a guy that's beaten to a pulp, you're probably going to court.

As for self-defence; situational awareness is the most important skill. If the fight even happens, you've done something wrong most of the time.

ashkelon
12/12/2011 4:38am,
Dutch Kickboxing.

you mean the dutch style of muay thai?

Tom Kagan
12/12/2011 6:50am,
That is a pretty big call.

What is your reasoning behind that?

Are you this blind?

Assuming you are stupid enough to ignore all of the bajillion signs leading up to being involved in a potentially violent encounter, what's is, hands down, the number one response necessary for you to attempt for for the situation to even be legally labeled "self-defense" instead of a brawl?

MMAMickey
12/12/2011 6:55am,
Are you this blind?

Assuming you are stupid enough to ignore all of the bajillion signs leading up to being involved in a potentially violent encounter, what's is, hands down, the number one response necessary for you to attempt for for the situation to even be legally labeled "self-defense" instead of a brawl?

That depends where you live.

In the UK, running (assuming that's what you're getting at) isn't necessary at all. It just has to be clear that you weren't the agressor, and the force you used was proportional to the threat.

Sang
12/12/2011 7:22am,
I agree with Kagan, splitting your training time up initially (unless you are training 2+ classes a night) is a good way to suck at both, spend a lot of money and still suck at both a year later.

gregaquaman
12/12/2011 7:59am,
Are you this blind?

Assuming you are stupid enough to ignore all of the bajillion signs leading up to being involved in a potentially violent encounter, what's is, hands down, the number one response necessary for you to attempt for for the situation to even be legally labeled "self-defense" instead of a brawl?
Fear.
Being in fear of your life.

That of course that isn't the answer it is just a cheap way of trying to win an argument.

I dont believe people mostly do martial arts to go out and **** people up. I feel there is a concern that they will be attacked and in a natrual reaction to not wanting to be beaten up and so learn to defend themselves.

Telling people to avoid fights is like telling people to avoid fire. It is generally pretty instinctive.

But my question was more along Sangs post regarding why doing a combination of striking and grappling would be worse than just grappling. Other than a matter of time spent training both. (I would have a primary art) But I would suggest people go out and learn what a punch looks like as well.

robdaze151
12/12/2011 8:28am,
sanshou. ****, am i the only one here that sees the awesomeness of this art?
-transitions from striking to throws
-transition from standup to ground fighting
what is not to like