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atomicpoet
7/09/2011 1:45am,
I just finished a marathon of watching early UFCs. In chronological order, I watched UFC 1-5. It strikes me that of any UFC ever, UFC 3 has to be the lamest.

It featured:

The circus freak match of a 5'10" 200lbs Kenpo practitioner Keith Hackney against a 6'8" 600lbs Emmanuel Yarborough. Yarborough had zero agility, and Hackney broke his fist against Yarborough's head.
Kimo Leopoldo entered the ring strapped to a cross with his entourage telling the audience to repent of their sins.
A clearly mentally unstable Harold Howard who was gung hu over facing Royce Gracie, only to have Gracie throw in the towel right before the match started.
When it became obvious Gracie wasn't going to continue the tournament, Ken Shamrock decided that he too was going to bow out citing an injury.
The highlight was Harold Howard missing a scissor-flip kick and landing on his back.
Steve Jennum entered the final having not fought anyone. Being fresh, he handily defeated Howard who expended all his energy failing at his scissor-flip kick.
This would mark the only time a ninja would win a UFC title


I can now appreciate how far the sport has evolved -- and their strong efforts towards not repeating the craptitude that was UFC 3. May a debacle of that magnitude never happen again.

excludedmiddle
7/09/2011 3:08am,
Strange. I thought all of those things made it memorable and awesome (except for Royce and Ken ducking out).

Harold Howard's first fight, Karate beats Muay Thai with a KO. Pretty awesome fight for back then. Steve Jennum ninja-ing his way to win the tournament, hilarious and awesome. A 210 lb Kenpo guy beating a 600 lb sumo guy while breaking his hand on his face? What's not to love?

If you're comin on, COME ON!!

Colin
7/09/2011 3:56am,
I have to agree with E.M.

All those things (with the possible exception of Jennum) made UFC3 awesome.

PXM
7/09/2011 4:46am,
The fact that Jennum didn't have to fight anyone till the last fight proves his skill in ninja subterfuge.

Colin
7/09/2011 4:50am,
The fact that Jennum didn't have to fight anyone till the last fight proves his skill in ninja subterfuge.

How is it that this beautiful irony seems to escape atomic?
Imagine if Jennum "convinced" shamrock and gracie to drop out... [/troll]

The plot thickens.

PXM
7/09/2011 5:35am,
He left them the severed heads of their puppies.

Shut up everyone knows MMA fighters have puppies.

Those Pit bull terriers with spiky chains have to start somewhere.

Holy Moment
7/09/2011 8:07am,
Strange. I thought all of those things made it memorable and awesome (except for Royce and Ken ducking out).


I agree, but I don't necessarily think Royce and Ken ducking out was that bad. It made things more interesting and raised the tension of their rivalry, almost like how something in pro wrestling would play out. The real lame part in all this was the ultimate payoff in UFC 5 (God knows if it would've been any better in UFC 3).

One funny thing about Steve Jennum winning the tournament is that he was treated like a Cinderella man in Black Belt mag. It turns out that earlier that night, he missed two other opportunities to get on the card (Once against Ken Shamrock and once against Harold Howard in the semis). Against Shamrock, he was replaced by the second alternate Felix Lee Mitchell when the UFC staff couldn't find Jennum in the crowd after Hackney dropped out. When Royce dropped out against Howard, the event organizers decided just to move to the finale to save time.

Edit: Does the OP plan on watching more oldschool events? Just wait until you get to UFC's 9 and 11, and then you'll know what a REAL lame event looks like.

BumFu
7/09/2011 8:16am,
No mention that the fat guy has a background in "both sumoo and judoo"?

Twas seared in my memory.

Bad Apple
7/09/2011 1:57pm,
I just finished a marathon of watching early UFCs. In chronological order, I watched UFC 1-5. It strikes me that of any UFC ever, UFC 3 has to be the lamest.

It featured:

[List]
The circus freak match of a 5'10" 200lbs Kenpo practitioner Keith Hackney against a 6'8" 600lbs Emmanuel Yarborough. Yarborough had zero agility, and Hackney broke his fist against Yarborough's head.

To me this fight is a perfect example of why fighters who plan on doing heavy striking need gloves as well as size doesn't count as much as other factors. Also I would argue that EVERY early UFC match was a freakshow.


Kimo Leopoldo entered the ring strapped to a cross with his entourage telling the audience to repent of their sins.

I will agree that it was a bit over the top as far as ring entrance theatrics go but the fight itself was another (and better) proof of technique over size and strength. Also it is a reminder of why military forces as far back as the Romans made their fighters shave off beards and cut their hair short. That fight may have turned out quite different if Kimo didn't wear that silly Mongolian ponytail for Royce to grab onto.



I can now appreciate how far the sport has evolved -- and their strong efforts towards not repeating the craptitude that was UFC 3. May a debacle of that magnitude never happen again.

It is a good history lesson and what little footage remains available must be preserved if only to refute the mcdojo dumbasses that still theorize about how the downward elbow is the 100% counter to single or double leg takedown, throat and groin strikes are instantly deadly fight enders and so on. IT'S. BEEN. DONE. The minimalist ruleset and style vs style "peer review process" never got the publicity that MMA has now. It's pretty unrealistic to think it will return in any form but I'd still like to see it.

atomicpoet
7/09/2011 3:53pm,
I recognize the educational value of UFC 3, but it should be taken with a grain of salt.

First, contrary to what the colour commentators said, it was the well conditioned athletes, not necessarily the most adept at technique who did well. It was no accident that as each UFC went by, fighters got bigger and bigger.

Second, with the notable exceptions of Gerard Gordeau and Patrick Smith, the "punchers" -- as UFC called them -- were not elite level strikers. Funny enough, Gordeau and Smith were also the guys who advanced to the finals against Royce Gracie in UFC 1 and 2.

Third, I found it annoying that UFC kept saying there "were no rules" when there clearly were rules.

What UFC did do was cause the martial arts community to better respect the grappling arts. I remember as a kid talking to my gym teacher who had a black belt in karate. He told me "wrestlers don't know how to fight". Well, I doubt anyone will say that nowadays.

Larus marinus
7/09/2011 4:44pm,
What UFC did do was cause the martial arts community to better respect the grappling arts. I remember as a kid talking to my gym teacher who had a black belt in karate. He told me "wrestlers don't know how to fight". Well, I doubt anyone will say that nowadays.

Yeah they do. All the damn time. From reading YouTube comments you'd think that wrestlers are only alive and flaunting their roided-up homosexuality because people aren't allowed to elbow them in the spine or jam both thumbs into their eye sockets until goop comes out.

PXM
7/09/2011 6:20pm,
Or there's the other end of the spectrum. Where you get comments sucking the nuts of grapplings virtues and proclaiming that any who claim otherwise face doom from a TapouT attired roid rager choking you out through their nutsack.

Larus marinus
7/09/2011 6:27pm,
Or there's the other end of the spectrum. Where you get comments sucking the nuts of grapplings virtues and proclaiming that any who claim otherwise face doom from a TapouT attired roid rager choking you out through their nutsack.

Oh yeah - the 'I'd freaking destroy <current heavyweight boxing champ> with my two months of <grappling art>, man!' guy.

alex
7/09/2011 8:55pm,
I recognize the educational value of UFC 3, but it should be taken with a grain of salt.

First, contrary to what the colour commentators said, it was the well conditioned athletes, not necessarily the most adept at technique who did well. It was no accident that as each UFC went by, fighters got bigger and bigger.

Second, with the notable exceptions of Gerard Gordeau and Patrick Smith, the "punchers" -- as UFC called them -- were not elite level strikers. Funny enough, Gordeau and Smith were also the guys who advanced to the finals against Royce Gracie in UFC 1 and 2.

Third, I found it annoying that UFC kept saying there "were no rules" when there clearly were rules.

What UFC did do was cause the martial arts community to better respect the grappling arts. I remember as a kid talking to my gym teacher who had a black belt in karate. He told me "wrestlers don't know how to fight". Well, I doubt anyone will say that nowadays.

what is your point on this site other than to attempt to rubbish on the UFC? honestly interested because all ive ever read of you is on this subject. this whole thread was just a setup for you to do the above post and continue trashing.

personally i think youre just a fucking moron, but im sure there is more to it than that since i consider almost everyone i talk to a moron. in fact, when i talk to myself, i often become disgusted at what a dipshit i am.

Matt Phillips
7/09/2011 10:04pm,
with the notable exceptions of Gerard Gordeau and Patrick Smith, the "punchers" -- as UFC called them -- were not elite level strikers. Funny enough, Gordeau and Smith were also the guys who advanced to the finals against Royce Gracie in UFC 1 and 2.
* Art Jimmerson was at top 10 Cruiserweight when he fought in UFC 1
* Kevin Rosier, although out of shape for UFC I, had been 3xWKA World and 1x North American superheavy weight kickboxing champion (66-8 with 66 KO's)
* Minoki Ichihara was several time champion of Daido Juku/Kudo
* Johnny Rhodes was not terribly notable, but had been competitive on the national Karate scene and was twice Nevada State Kickboxing Champion
* And lets not forget Orlando Weit, who is one of the best strikers ever to appear in the UFC, and was WTC Super Middleweight World Champion in 1997

There were a **** ton of legit strikers in UFC I and II. To those who say Royce should have fought the current world champs, I say those champs should have been matched against Mario Sperry who was the legit BJJ world champ at the time, and not Royce who was 2nd tier at best.

Also Pat Smith advanced to the finals by beating 2 of 3 opponents with subs (standing guillotine)

atomicpoet
7/09/2011 11:22pm,
what is your point on this site other than to attempt to rubbish on the UFC?

I'm surprised you think I'm insulting the UFC -- especially since I stated explicitly that the UFC has vastly improved since UFC 3. Is this your way of saying I should eat **** and pretend it's fine French cuisine?

How do you think UFC 3 compares to laters UFCs?


* Art Jimmerson was at top 10 Cruiserweight when he fought in UFC 1

His most notable fight was a loss against Andrew Maynard, which was stopped in the third round on advice of the ring doctor.


* Kevin Rosier, although out of shape for UFC I, had been 3xWKA World and 1x North American superheavy weight kickboxing champion (66-8 with 66 KO's)

Exactly.


* Minoki Ichihara was several time champion of Daido Juku/Kudo

He was a little guy who probably didn't stand much of a chance -- which reinforces what I said before: It was no accident that as each UFC went by, fighters got bigger and bigger. Either way, Daido Juku is a comparatively obscure organization and Minoki Ichihara is an obscure person -- if not for UFC 2.


* Johnny Rhodes was not terribly notable, but had been competitive on the national Karate scene and was twice Nevada State Kickboxing Champion

Exactly.


* And lets not forget Orlando Weit, who is one of the best strikers ever to appear in the UFC, and was WTC Super Middleweight World Champion in 1997

I have no idea what WTC is, but I'll take your word on this.


There were a **** ton of legit strikers in UFC I and II.

You're talking about legitimacy, and I'm talking about notability. There's no question in my mind that the strikers knew their craft. That still doesn't mean their resumes were as impressive as the grapplers.

Royce Gracie grew up a Gracie -- second tier or otherwise, that means something. Ken Shamrock was a superstar in Japan and had his own comic book. Dan Severn had over 70 international wrestling titles. Oleg Taktarov was an undefeated Sambo champion for a 10 year stretch.

These guys walking into the cage were at optimum physical condition. They went in to prove something, and they did it.