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View Full Version : Bullshido, I ask your advice...



atomicpoet
6/29/2011 11:40pm,
Forgive the long post, but I can't condense this further.

In martial arts, I'm under no illusions about my abilities. I will be an amateur for the rest of my life. I am content knowing this -- my only ambition is to be good enough.

It just so happens I'm in a profession that is high demand, lacks people with expertise -- and I happen to be good at it.

But a situation today gave me pause.

For one year, I've been boxing -- and I've long wanted to eventually transition to kickboxing. A friend recommended me somewhere and I signed up for an introductory class. Unfortunately, on the form I filled out beforehand, I wrote down my profession and employer.

When I was finished, the academy's owner asked me to go to the boardroom with him (he's also the organization's founder). The owner then launched into how his organization needed someone with my talents, and strongly hinted that he was willing to hire me.

However, I like my job. I'm not leaving it.

I enjoyed the introductory class I had -- and there's nothing I love more than helping businesses succeed. I gave him a few mini consulting tips as a gratuity. I thought I was finished.

But... the owner offered me a year's worth of free training. He said it was out of gratitude. That was nice of him. However, I have a slightly uneasy feeling about the whole thing.

What should I do? Should I stick to boxing and forget about involving myself with this organization? Or should I just pay the regular fees like everyone else and continue as a regular student of his? I don't think I can take him up on his offer.

I'd love to understand things from a dojo's owners perspective. Thoughts?

Gidi
6/30/2011 4:41am,
This is interesting.
Can you tell us what is your profession, or a general idea of what it is?
Because obviously some jobs have different ethical codes to them, that might help in such an issue.

Also, how are you for options? is this the only KB available, how set are you on it? and the place itself, were you really in to it?

These are other parts of the puzzle, that while may not be absolutely relevant to your ethical question, should naturally hold sway on your decision - not saying you don't know this stuff, just so you don't get locked in to the ethical issue, while forgetting something as simple as "the commute is a bitch, and I'm likely to go maybe once every other week".

Also, what dojo has a boardroom?
Or is this just where they keep the boards for breaking?

Cake of Doom
6/30/2011 5:04am,
If you like the place then pay the fees. Don't put yourself in a position where you feel you owe the guy something. If pressed, say you don't mind offering advice or pointers, here and there (as long as you really don't mind).

I can see how this can turn into an uncomfortable situation for you so perhaps, as Gidi suggested, go elsewhere.

Devil
6/30/2011 10:19am,
Does he want to hire you as an employee or contractor? If you're in a high demand profession, I can't imagine any martial arts academy being able to afford making it worth your while to work for them.

Edit: Nevermind - I see you've already chosen not to leave your job. I don't see what the big dilemma is. If he's offering you some work on the side and you want it, then do it. If you don't want the work, don't take his freebies. What's the problem?

Cake of Doom
6/30/2011 10:31am,
*****

atomicpoet
6/30/2011 10:47am,
Can you tell us what is your profession, or a general idea of what it is?

Generally speaking, I do marketing/PR for media. There's specifics about it that make it high demand.


Also, what dojo has a boardroom?

Yeah, can you imagine how uncomfortable I felt after an introductory lesson?


Don't put yourself in a position where you feel you owe the guy something. If pressed, say you don't mind offering advice or pointers, here and there (as long as you really don't mind).

That's exactly how I feel too.


I don't see what the big dilemma is.

The dilemma was continue training at that place while paying the regular fee or move one.

After a good night's sleep, I've chosen to move on. Even if I pay regular fees, he seems like the kind of guy who'd try to coax me continually to do work for him. There's no way I'm doing that. Besides, I could always continue to improve my boxing at my current gym -- where my trainers don't give a damn about what I do for a living.

I'll give him a few pointers, but after that, I'm pretty much done.

Devil
6/30/2011 11:49am,
Wow. Shitty move on the owner's part to run off a student that way.

Lebell
6/30/2011 12:58pm,
just milk that sucker for what he's worth.
make sure you got it on paper, his offer that is.

atomicpoet
6/30/2011 4:56pm,
just milk that sucker for what he's worth.
make sure you got it on paper, his offer that is.

One thing I've learned in this business is that clients often think you should do work for free. A couple hours per week of instruction is not worth the effort it takes to drive a comprehensive marketing strategy. It takes painstaking effort to build a brand, especially one potential customers can trust.

If this fellow cultivates a sense of distrust in me by cornering me after my introductory lesson, how could I ever do work for him -- especially if he's wanting me to do it for free?

Screw that.

Lebell
7/01/2011 10:11am,
okay so you got it already figured out, stop whining already!
:-p

tao.jonez
7/01/2011 10:25am,
Guy seems like a leech to me. Even if he's offering good instruction, I'd make the same decision you did and gtfo. Your profession should have no bearing on the training you get.