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Demontom
6/17/2011 7:10am,
Hello, I'm Tom. I have no experience in the martial arts but it's always been something I've had a moderate interest in. A while back I got jumped walking home from work and I realized I really need to learn to defend myself better. Thankfully I didn't suffer any serious injuries, just a few bruises etc.

Onto my question; What would be a good striking style for me to begin with? I've read the sticky on how to find a good school, I just don't know what style to choose, so any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I realize it'll take awhile before the skills I learn will become applicable on the streets, I'm not looking for a magic fix. Thanks in advance.

Odacon
6/17/2011 7:17am,
Hello, I'm Tom. I have no experience in the martial arts but it's always been something I've had a moderate interest in. A while back I got jumped walking home from work and I realized I really need to learn to defend myself better. Thankfully I didn't suffer any serious injuries, just a few bruises etc.

Onto my question; What would be a good striking style for me to begin with? I've read the sticky on how to find a good school, I just don't know what style to choose, so any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I realize it'll take awhile before the skills I learn will become applicable on the streets, I'm not looking for a magic fix. Thanks in advance.

What places are available to you?

Ignorami
6/17/2011 7:18am,
Boxing.

• Cheap
• Readily available.
• A fairly narrow curriculum (excuse me boxers) means you'll be spending a lot of time training a few useful things.
• Will get you fit and strong (Easily as important as technique, despite what us Aikidoka claim)
• You'll get used to being hit in the head (one of the best self defence attributes ever invented)

I should point out, that a grappling art for self defence (judo) will offer the opportunity to respond to less serious attack without upping the stakes by striking. At the same time will still be very effective if the attack is of a more serious nature

Demontom
6/17/2011 7:26am,
Ignorami, that's actually a very good point that I didn't consider. Striking does tend to up the stakes of a fight. Perhaps I should look into Judo as a compliment to boxing. Though would you recommend boxing or kickboxing?

I just looked it up and there's actually a couple judo schools and a few boxing clubs within walking distance. I think I'll take a look at those on my next day off from work.

Ignorami
6/17/2011 7:39am,
Given your aims, I'd say boxing over kick-boxing. You won't be splitting your training time between punches and kicks. Kicks are generally less useful to the common man anyway. (That said, boxing won't teach you to defend against kicks like kickboxing will)

If you pick up the punching really fast, or if you just fancy adding an element to your boxing, add Kick-boxing later.

Muay Thai is also an option, of course. It'll teach punching and kicking, so same pros/cons as kickboxing, but it also has a grappling element in the "thai clinch".

It's not grappling in the sense that Judo/BJJ/wrestling is, but for self defence I imagine that combination of "grabbing & smiting" fully rocks!

Demontom
6/17/2011 7:54am,
Well it doesn't seem like there are any Muay Thai schools in my area so I guess that's out. Well I'll take a look at the different boxing and judo schools in the area and I'll see how those appeal to me. Worst case scenario is I don't like them and I'll be back asking for more suggestions. Thanks for all the help and if you think of anything else to add, I'm always up for some advice.

Ignorami
6/17/2011 8:11am,
Welcome to Bullshido.

As someone starting completely from scratch, you might consider making this thread a training blog?

(There is a proper area for that, but I can't remember if you need to be a supporting member to use it).

yli
6/17/2011 8:16am,
Take boxing and judo. Not boxing or judo, boxing and judo. It always helps to cross train. Or take Muay Thai and BJJ, or take kickboxing and western wrestling. Being able to fight at all ranges is the key to fighting well.

Don't take Krav Maga (at least yet).

Demontom
6/17/2011 8:17am,
Hey, that's not a bad idea. I think I'll do that, though I'll look to see if I can find that area before I start blogging here.

Edit: Well, unless I'm completely blind (which IS always a possibility) I don't see the area so I guess I'll use this thread. If I AM blind, someone please point out the proper place.

First update to the blog:

I've e-mailed a couple schools, waiting to hear back from them on pricing and schedules. Might have to talk to work about changing the hours I'm available so I can regularly take classes. We shall see, don't want to be spending $200 a month to take 3 classes or whatever.

yli
6/17/2011 9:22am,
Also, just to satiate my curiosity, which books on Krav Maga did you read?

Rene "Zendokan" Gysenbergs
6/17/2011 9:33am,
Where do you live?
I can recommend Sanshou, Sanda, Shootboxing or Draka Kickboxing, but if we don't have the slightest clue where you live, there's a possibility that such schools aren't in the area.

Demontom
6/17/2011 9:37am,
Zli well, I've only actually read one book, but it was this one. http://martialartstrainingvideos.net/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=50&products_id=1319&zenid=fd323f54a8caa41e2f9425dd57a003ad

Rene, I live in Manchester, NH.

yli
6/17/2011 10:00am,
David Kahn is a very good instructor and writer. The only dodgy part about that book is that it'll teach you how to "Use specially designed drills and a 12-week training program to become a kravist---a smart and prepared fighter". It takes a minimum of 16-20 months of Krav Maga to use it to defend oneself, and that's operating on the assumption of you being highly physically fit (which is why you're better off learning boxing and judo).

Everything else in that work is top notch.

Demontom
6/17/2011 10:13am,
Yeah, I'm not exactly highly physically fit. I'm closer to the stereotypical American at this point. For now I'll focus on Boxing and Judo. Once I've, well I don't want to say "mastered" since I feel there's always something new to learn, fleshed out my skills in those, I may branch out further. But for now, one step at a time. First step is boxing/judo and getting myself back into a healthy weight range. Right now I'm 5'11" and 220 lbs so I've got a bit of weight loss to do.

JSK_83
6/17/2011 10:29am,
Welcome. Train in anything that fits your needs, like Krav or Silat. But make sure the place you go to doesn't have any watered-down techinques/training because it's very common.

Demontom
6/20/2011 5:48pm,
Well, I just took my first boxing class and I figured I'd give my impressions and tell everyone how it went.

I arrived 20 minutes early, no other students had arrived yet. Dunno if that's a good thing or not. The teacher gave me a tour of the building while we waited. After the tour and the 4 other students arrived, we were all told to grab a jump rope. As it was my first time, the teacher told me to just do what I could and we'd see where I was at. At first, doing the simple normal jump roping, I did fine. Hit 41 before I slipped up. The others were doing modified skips, depending on their level of agility.

In between jump rope sets we would do things like push ups and other stretches. The only thing I utterly failed on were the fingertip pushups (sorry, my upper body strength vs upper body weight are not yet proportional, the teacher understood though)

After the various exercises, we took out 10 foot long 2x4 planks. We balanced on these planks while doing different boxing motions, such as ducking, or level changes as she called it, stepping forwards and backwards, jabs and straight punches. Generally to test/improve our balance.

After the balance exercises we went downstairs into the gym to hit the heavy bags. Mostly to test our accuracy and our ability to chain strikes together. This is where I excelled. I managed to nail all except the 9 strike combo on my first try, the 9 strike took 2 attempts to get it done correctly. The only problem with my 9 strike combo was that my jab chain was too slow at first (partly due to the fact that this was at the tail end of an hour long training session).

Apparently I did well, especially for my first time ever boxing. The teacher thought I had taken part in other team sports somewhat recently. That is not the case, unless you count 1 season of little league baseball back when I was in 3rd grade. Perhaps she was snowballing me to try to get me to be more willing to sign up, I don't know. But regardless of that I had a good time. It was strenuous but still quite fun. I do think I'll be going back.

The prices are $55 a month for 1 training class a week, $90 for 2 weekly, $100 for 3 per week, and $135 for unlimited striking classes per week. The striking classes encompass boxing, kickboxing, and MMA for Self Defense. All of the plans also come with unlimited gym use. I'll probably sign up for the 3 classes/weekly since that's likely all my work schedule would allow for.