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View Full Version : Lutador Grappling 4/9/2011Videos



Kintanon
4/11/2011 9:13am,
So, my videos from Lutador are posted up over at my training log (http://kintanon.blogspot.com/2011/04/lutador-april-2011-videos.html) along with the writeup (http://kintanon.blogspot.com/2011/04/lutador-492011-post-mortem.html) of the event itself.

Check 'em out, hit me with feedback, hate on me, whatever.
For those who are too lazy to click on more than one link here are the direct links to the videos:

Advanced No-Gi

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_KZZr2G788

Masters Blue Belt

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twSqDmm3EA4

Blue Belt Absolute Match 1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iaa_xNvfQ68

Blue Belt Absolute Match 2

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XKxe8s1fBQ8

tao.jonez
4/11/2011 9:55am,
Absolute Match 1:

"wtf, this guy isn't doing anything...guess I'll roll hi....um, I think he's dead."

On the losses, it's tough to be the small guy. Good hips and crazy legs, so nice work. Question though - why pull guard and go to your back when you're the smaller dude? For me it's tough as hell to get out from under the bigger guys.

Kintanon
4/11/2011 10:05am,
Honestly, with the bigger guys I am WAY more comfortable on my back working. My game plan is geared towards them because that's who I roll with in the gym. I have a better feel for their body mechanics, etc...
With the guys closer to my weight I just don't have the same feel for it. I rarely roll with any really skilled guys my size, so when I run into them I'm not prepared for the kind of game they play. I KNEW I could beat that guy in the first absolute match. 100%. I've done it hundreds of times to guys just like him. The rest of them, I had no idea what to really expect from a guy my size playing against me.

That's one of the reasons I'm trying to build some trips to Alliance HQ into my schedule. There are more high level guys my size up there for me to work against.

Omega Supreme
4/11/2011 10:13am,
Kin, you've got to learn to switch up your grapple game in no gi. You never controlled the guys posture either. You almost did it once at 2:07 as you reached for the Kimura but that was a low percentage maneuver given the situation. If you feint getting to your feet you can draw them deeper into your guard and control their hips. Then you can switch to lockdowns and deep half transitions.

Besides that not bad.

Kintanon
4/11/2011 10:24am,
Yah, I actually made that point to myself about 2 weeks before the tournament, that I was no longer working to control posture in no-gi as aggressively as I should be. That and side control work are both my top priorities going forward after seeing this.
Though in my defense, that guy has been a purple belt for 1.5 years and took 1st or 2nd in the division with one of his team mates.

Omega Supreme
4/11/2011 11:07am,
Yah, I actually made that point to myself about 2 weeks before the tournament, that I was no longer working to control posture in no-gi as aggressively as I should be. That and side control work are both my top priorities going forward after seeing this.
Though in my defense, that guy has been a purple belt for 1.5 years and took 1st or 2nd in the division with one of his team mates.

Understood, may I suggest a fake shot off your back to control hips anyway?

Kintanon
4/11/2011 11:19am,
That's definitely something I'll add into my arsenal and start practicing.

BKR
4/12/2011 11:06am,
I can't really comment on no gi, and I'm a judo guy, so you can take this with a grain of salt regarding the gi matches.

You kept getting your guard passed. I looked to me like you need to work on using the jacket to control your opponents better. The double sleeve or one handed (?) grip was not very effective, and you didn't combine the use of your legs and arms effectively in open guard.

I see you don't get to work with guys your size/level much. They are more mobile and need to be controlled more, as you have less time to react to their attempts to pass. Increased control will help with bigger guys as well, with due care given to not getting smashed, something I'm sure you are familiar with from bigger guys.

I like to use the same sided grip sleeve and lapel, controlling their lead arm and pulling their head down in open guard. I find it works pretty well against larger and smaller guys. On smaller guys, you can slow them down and keep them from passing and/or sweep, and on larger guys you can scoot out to the side and get on their back or to your deep half guard.

In any case, nice work, the choke out was great, that takes a lot of skill to pull off.

Ben

Kintanon
4/12/2011 11:14am,
My primary control method in Gi is spider guard and spider guard variations, and I never seemed to be able to get to it against the two smaller guys in Gi. Not sure what about them made it so difficult, but I just couldn't seem to put together any control against them.

BKR
4/12/2011 1:55pm,
My primary control method in Gi is spider guard and spider guard variations, and I never seemed to be able to get to it against the two smaller guys in Gi. Not sure what about them made it so difficult, but I just couldn't seem to put together any control against them.

So that is what that is called, Spider guard. It looks like a type of guard that requires a lot of skill, mobility, and sensitivity to use to achieve/maintain control. makes sense because you are controlling sleeve ends only and not closer to the core of their upper body. Kind of like a double sleeve grip in Judo.

Ben

Kintanon
4/12/2011 2:12pm,
The control is obtained by pulling on the sleeves while you push on the biceps with your feet. It can be VERY unbalancing. The variation I use when people stand up is with my feet on their hips, where again you push into them with your legs, while pulling on the sleeves. I get overhead sweeps from there and transition to sickle sweeps, leg hook guard and the associated sweeps, and an array of other things, or I can transition to the collar grip and work on the chokes. In practice, it works great, in competition it worked on the bigger, slower opponent but I was never able to put it together against the little guys. Need MOAR PRACTICE!

BKR
4/12/2011 5:28pm,
The control is obtained by pulling on the sleeves while you push on the biceps with your feet. It can be VERY unbalancing. The variation I use when people stand up is with my feet on their hips, where again you push into them with your legs, while pulling on the sleeves. I get overhead sweeps from there and transition to sickle sweeps, leg hook guard and the associated sweeps, and an array of other things, or I can transition to the collar grip and work on the chokes. In practice, it works great, in competition it worked on the bigger, slower opponent but I was never able to put it together against the little guys. Need MOAR PRACTICE!

We all need more practice, good luck with it. I'm curious as to why you chose that guard option. Not criticizing, I can understand what you have explained, but admit not using or knowing how to use Spider Guard instead of something simpler. Not looking for exposition on Spider Guard, just your personal reasons.

Ben

Kintanon
4/12/2011 6:54pm,
Mostly because it lets me use my much stronger legs to keep heavier people off of me in the gym. A lot of training partners are 200lbs and up and it takes a LOT of work to play closed guard or butterfly with them, so I fall back to positions where I can keep their weight on my legs. It kind of evolved out of putting my feet on peoples hips to keep them away at first, then moved on to full blown spider guard. But it's not the guard I prefer to use against guys my size. I prefer butterfly for that, but for various reasons I don't actually get to PLAY butterfly that often in my gym.

BKR
4/12/2011 7:01pm,
Yeah, I'm short with short legs, big difference in what you can do to keep guys at bay. Hopefully you can end up with some guys your size to train with, otherwise it will be tough in any sort of regular weight division. Thanks for the explanation!

I tend to use a one in and one out kind of open guard, or both feet on their hips, whichever fits the moment the best.

Ben