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ericsenn
3/30/2011 6:00am,
well i just joined this site because i have alot of questions about martial arts and figure the best way to learn about it, is from actual martial artists.

i took boxing (i know its not a martial art) for about 2 years when i was younger and loved the traing, sparing, and physical aspect of a fighting sport, and im looking at getting back into one. however, this time id like to take a martial art. and after a little research i became very interested in ninjutsu.

so im asking for any information, first hand accounts of what its like, what its cerntered aaround, what to expect, major draw backs, strong points, that sort of stuff. and more so, if anyone knows of any schools around spokane washington were i could learn it!

thats about it, thanks!

Evil Solvalou
3/30/2011 6:15am,
Welcome to Bullshido.

First of all, Boxing is a martial art.

Second, one of the best places to go on this site for information on Ninjutsu is the Karate, Judo, and Jujitsu - Japanese Martial Arts Forum (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=103); discussions there are more moderated than areas like YMAS so you'll get some good discussions. Just scroll through, and pick the threads that interest you. It would probably be best to not start a thread in there yet though; wait until you're more experienced in this site and make sure it's a question that hasn't already been asked.

Son of Thunder
3/30/2011 12:24pm,
Welcome to Bullshido.

First of all, Boxing is a martial art.

Second, one of the best places to go on this site for information on Ninjutsu is the Karate, Judo, and Jujitsu - Japanese Martial Arts Forum (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=103); discussions there are more moderated than areas like YMAS so you'll get some good discussions. Just scroll through, and pick the threads that interest you. It would probably be best to not start a thread in there yet though; wait until you're more experienced in this site and make sure it's a question that hasn't already been asked.

In fact, the first two "READ ME" threads are about ninjutsu.

I did Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu for about seven years. I found that the best part of training in ninjutsu is learning how to kill people with your mind (that way I have to do fewer pushups). The downside is that, when you summon tengu demons to help you train, sometimes they try to sell you car insurance.

Styygens
3/30/2011 6:54pm,
In fact, the first two "READ ME" threads are about ninjutsu.

I did Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu for about seven years. I found that the best part of training in ninjutsu is learning how to kill people with your mind (that way I have to do fewer pushups). The downside is that, when you summon tengu demons to help you train, sometimes they try to sell you car insurance.

You're new here yourself. You need to go read the stickies.

Trolling is not permitted in Newbietown. Except by Omega the Merciless; it's a fact.

Styygens
3/30/2011 6:59pm,
well i just joined this site because i have alot of questions about martial arts and figure the best way to learn about it, is from actual martial artists.

i took boxing (i know its not a martial art) for about 2 years when i was younger and loved the traing, sparing, and physical aspect of a fighting sport, and im looking at getting back into one. however, this time id like to take a martial art. and after a little research i became very interested in ninjutsu.

so im asking for any information, first hand accounts of what its like, what its cerntered aaround, what to expect, major draw backs, strong points, that sort of stuff. and more so, if anyone knows of any schools around spokane washington were i could learn it!

thats about it, thanks!

Let me answer with a question of my own: what is it about "ninjutsu" that made you interested? Is there some aspect that particularly appealed to you?

You're questions aren't off the mark, just awfully broad. I'd rather start with getting some idea of your perspective so I can be sure my witty anecdotes address your interests.

Colin
3/30/2011 7:06pm,
I too, would like to know what would cause you to be interested in ninjutsu. Is it because the imagery and concept of being a ninja is just too awesome to resist? Perhaps you want to learn how to break into your dads liquor cabinet without him hearing you, I'm not sure.

P.S. All your previous boxing training is likely very different to any training you would experience in the Booj.

In any case, I'm all ears. What is it about Ninjutsu that interests you?

antiherozero
3/30/2011 9:48pm,
First of all, it's taijutsu, or x-kan training (Bujinkan, Jinenkan, Genbukan) that you're looking for.

When I lived in Spokane a few years ago there were no active x-kan schools or members, though one guy recently moved back but had stopped training. No idea who he is or how to reach him since I don't talk to the person who told me about him anymore. There is a Bujinkan school in Seattle, and I think Vancouver. There in a Genbukan school somewhere near Vancouver. There "were" two school in Yakima, but one teacher changed his methods and now teaches his own hybrid system, and the other I haven't had contact with so I'm not sure he is still teaching. His info was as follows:

Mike Tari
Bujinkan Tenchijin Dojo Yakima
PO Box 8146, Yakima, WA, 98908/phone(1-509) 965-8443

There is one other guy 2.5 hours away from you, but he doesn't teach anyone anymore. You might want to ask over at MAP in the Ninjutsu section, as they have a more constructive environment over there for x-kan questions. This site is very biased towards BJJ and Judo and very immature, so getting good info here is nearly impossible for the uninitiated.

If you're dead set on x-kan training, and there is no new school since my outdated info, I'd recommend traditional jujutsu, not the Brazilian sportier variety.

I reluctantly suggest if you're dead set on x-kan training to use Craigslist to find out if anyone wants to teach you, but the x-kan community is a magnet for crazies and phonies, so if you end up raped as a result, I'm sorry in advanced.

jspeedy
3/30/2011 10:02pm,
First of all, it's taijutsu, or x-kan training (Bujinkan, Jinenkan, Genbukan) that you're looking for.

When I lived in Spokane a few years ago there were no active x-kan schools or members, though one guy recently moved back but had stopped training. No idea who he is or how to reach him since I don't talk to the person who told me about him anymore. There is a Bujinkan school in Seattle, and I think Vancouver. There in a Genbukan school somewhere near Vancouver. There "were" two school in Yakima, but one teacher changed his methods and now teaches his own hybrid system, and the other I haven't had contact with so I'm not sure he is still teaching. His info was as follows:

Mike Tari
Bujinkan Tenchijin Dojo Yakima
PO Box 8146, Yakima, WA, 98908/phone(1-509) 965-8443

There is one other guy 2.5 hours away from you, but he doesn't teach anyone anymore. You might want to ask over at MAP in the Ninjutsu section, as they have a more constructive environment over there for x-kan questions. This site is very biased towards BJJ and Judo and very immature, so getting good info here is nearly impossible for the uninitiated.

If you're dead set on x-kan training, and there is no new school since my outdated info, I'd recommend traditional jujutsu, not the Brazilian sportier variety.

I reluctantly suggest if you're dead set on x-kan training to use Craigslist to find out if anyone wants to teach you, but the x-kan community is a magnet for crazies and phonies, so if you end up raped as a result, I'm sorry in advanced.

What's wrong with BJJ? Although, there are many sport based BJJ schools there are also many that are not sport based like some GJJ branches.

antiherozero
3/30/2011 10:22pm,
Nothing, as far as I know. From what I repeatedly hear though, and from what little I can deduce on the subject from a purely academic review of materials, jujutsu is more closely aligned with taijutsu vs BJJ.

ericsenn
3/31/2011 2:50am,
well i was watching some videos of it on youtube and from what i gathered its about fluidity of motion and using your opponents own aggresion against them. some of the videos i watched showed how there techniques were based around a principle were u block your opponents attack and let them follow through into your own attack. it seemed really interesting. i did wrestling in highschool and i found that my best offense is actually in my own defense. i didnt take wrestling as long as the other kids on my team so i was very inexperiance and i noticed my attemps at single and double legs were easily countered and reversed by them. but i also noticed i was pretty good at doing that myself, and eventually learned to let them make the first move and i would just counter. i never got amazing or anything but i did do alot better in my matches after that. so when i saw that video and how they preformed that martial art i just thought it would be a good choice for me seeing as how it already played into an area were i feel i have an advantage. thats all

Prince Vlad
3/31/2011 4:29am,
well i was watching some videos of it on youtube and from what i gathered its about fluidity of motion and using your opponents own aggresion against them. some of the videos i watched showed how there techniques were based around a principle were u block your opponents attack and let them follow through into your own attack. it seemed really interesting. i did wrestling in highschool and i found that my best offense is actually in my own defense. i didnt take wrestling as long as the other kids on my team so i was very inexperiance and i noticed my attemps at single and double legs were easily countered and reversed by them. but i also noticed i was pretty good at doing that myself, and eventually learned to let them make the first move and i would just counter. i never got amazing or anything but i did do alot better in my matches after that. so when i saw that video and how they preformed that martial art i just thought it would be a good choice for me seeing as how it already played into an area were i feel i have an advantage. thats all

Ninpo/ninjutsu, Bujinkan/x-kan gets a lot of stick on this site (and rightly so because of they way the style is presented and managed), however there are a lot of positives when you strip away the crappy teachers and get down to the core of the art. Taijutsu as you say above is very interesting in terms of fluidity and economy of movement especially. If you want to spend a lifetime mastering these movements (as per Tai Chi) then go for it. Crappy instructors with ridiculously high ranks and bad management aside, the bottom line about x-kan styles is that they don't work in real world for a whole number of reasons, most notably - they are not pressure tested, improved or updated and ALL of the training is compliant. I spent many years in the Bujinkan, my advice is to think hard about what you want to get out of the training before you go for it - even if you find a really great master level instructor. Don't get hung up on the sport vs martial art argument, just ask yourself do you want to learn a load of interesting moves or do you want to learn how to fight and protect yourself.

Styygens
3/31/2011 4:42pm,
well i was watching some videos of it on youtube and from what i gathered its about fluidity of motion and using your opponents own aggresion against them. some of the videos i watched showed how there techniques were based around a principle were u block your opponents attack and let them follow through into your own attack. it seemed really interesting. i did wrestling in highschool and i found that my best offense is actually in my own defense. i didnt take wrestling as long as the other kids on my team so i was very inexperiance and i noticed my attemps at single and double legs were easily countered and reversed by them. but i also noticed i was pretty good at doing that myself, and eventually learned to let them make the first move and i would just counter. i never got amazing or anything but i did do alot better in my matches after that. so when i saw that video and how they preformed that martial art i just thought it would be a good choice for me seeing as how it already played into an area were i feel i have an advantage. thats all

Thanks for the info.

It sounds like one of your requirements is self-defense. For that you need to look into Alive training methods and why they work. Not only do they work, but they show results relatively quickly.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H3r-G33oKHc

and


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=imjmLWj5WCU

The issue with Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu and the derivatives is that the training groups tend to stick with kata-based, compliant training. These are set arrangements that illustrate principles. The pedagogical method is based in old Confucian and Eastern theories of emulating a model. This is very foreign to the Western mind -- and the dirty little secret is that in days of old, Japanese warriors actually did spar and fight. Now, not so much. There is truth in the statement that Bujinkan techniques are not all that different from techniques found in most other Japanese martial arts. But the training is oriented very differently toward theory rather than practice.

You might be able to find a Bujinkan group that spars, but it will always be held back by the sheer number of kata to train.

If you like the idea of flow and fluidity, if you want something with a heavy Japanese flavor, and you want something that uses modern training methods and is proven to work, you should look at Judo. If you enjoyed wrestling and were moderately successful at it, Judo should be a good fit.

I'm making a couple of unspoken assumptions in that last paragraph. As Prince Vlad indicated, you really need to consider what your requirements are for an art. You distinctly mentioned self-defense, so I think you want an Alive art. The site is biased towards Alive training and those arts which use the methods, and for good reason.

ericsenn
3/31/2011 5:42pm,
you are guys are extreamly helpful thank you! and yes i deffintly want alive training and my decission to learn a new martial art is motivated by self defense.

judo (from what i know about it, could be wrong and tell me if i am) seemed to me to be primarily about throws and take downs, grappeling, that kind of stuff, wich i am interested in, but i want to find something a little more well rounded, that implements ground fighting along with striking. as a boxer, punching is what im acustomed to and what i love, put i feel like i have a serious disadvantage when it comes to dishin out the kicks.

thats why im looking for something in that well rounded variety. i have some skill in grappeling but it deffinatly needs work, and my kicking is pitiful at best. so i just need something that strengthens my weakness you know?

And no, im not set on a japanese style, i just thought ninjutsu or Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu looked different and powerful. now, it dosnt seem very practical to me.

Styygens
3/31/2011 8:29pm,
I'll let a Judoka discuss the in's-and-out's of Judo... But the amount of groundwork will depend on the school and the teachers. As always, visit the school and observe -- ask questions -- and then decide.

If there is a Bujinkan group near you, visit that too and observe. At least you'll be informed by the visit. I happen to like certain aspects of Bujinkan training, but that's because I enjoy theory. I crosstrain for practical purposes. Does it all comes together at some point? Ummm, maybe. But my training suits my purposes; I don't recommend it for everyone. If you want practical, find an art with Alive training.

ericsenn
3/31/2011 9:03pm,
do you know of any alive training, well rounded matrial arts?

Kintanon
3/31/2011 9:11pm,
Combat SAMBO has more strikes than Judo or BJJ, while also having takedowns and ground work, but the striking isn't on par with Muay Thai or Kyokushin or Boxing. If you want to be truly well rounded the best option is to train at an MMA school or pick one effective ground art (Judo, BJJ, SAMBO, Wrestling) and one effective standup art (Muay Thai, Boxing, Kyokushin) and train both. It's extremely difficult to find a single art that encompasses all ranges.