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me_too
3/24/2011 4:41pm,
I've been trying to get my oldest kid interested in something - anything. After a single season of baseball/soccer/football he'd not be interested in a second. Then, after some classmate brought stuff in for show-n-tell, my kid starts pestering me to sign him up for Tae Kwon Do.

I don't know much about martial arts, but thought teaching him to throw his kid brother to the ground might be better than teaching him to kick his brother in the face. So, I went looking for a Judo place. Unfortunately I found out I live in a county with only 1.1 million people in it. Obviously thatís much too small to support a kid's Judo program ("widely available" - hah!).

While looking, I came across this site, and an old post that seemed to make sense. Basically, "Just sign him up for anything. What does it matter? A month later he'll lose interest and want to do something else". Seemed perfect at the time so I stopped looking and signed him up at the place closest to our house.

Opps. Itís now a few months latter and he *likes* it. Since I've spent the last few months reading more of this site, I suddenly see years ahead of me paying $100 a month so the kid can karate kick the air, and whack things with nunchucks, and I don't like it.

In all seriousness though, the advice really wasn't bad - it just didn't work as planned. Now I have to figure a way to direct him into something else. But what? My choices in this area seem to be Tang So Do (current place), a million Tae Kwon Do places, or a couple Gracie Jiu-Jitsu places. From what little I've read here, the Jiu-Jitsu seems like the best possibility, except for one thing. The kidsí turning eight, and I've read some stuff on this site that says it might not be good for his bones/growth.

Is there any sort of consensus on that? What are people's thoughts on this situation?

A) Keep him where he's at until he's older so that he'll be unlikely to injure himself
B) Jiu-jitsu is perfectly safe, send him there
C) Talk to the Gracie places and ask them if they keep the kids away from the dangerous stuff (whatever that might be)

If anyone thinks 'C' is the answer, what would be some of the things I should be making sure they don't have the kids trying?


P.S. Any Judo instructors want to move next door and open up a kid's program? I can almost guarantee one customer. Tempted? <echo> Anyone?

It is Fake
3/24/2011 4:52pm,
So a poster gave you bad advice not bullshido? Most of those threads have one or two posts of "sign up for anything" followed by 10 to 20 posts of what happens when they learn bad habits or enjoys the bad choice.

You have just become a victim of what we yell here, on a constant basis, called " read the whole damn thread." If he enjoys what he is doing and is active that is a good thing in the 21st century. You only have yourself to blame. Is the school that bad or is it the price?

Do you remember what thread?

Snake Plissken
3/24/2011 4:57pm,
Please tell us which county (with *only 1.1 Million people) you live in and we might better help you with some informational options. I live in a town of 50K and there is (now) a Judo option available to me, so I am thinking you might not have looked hard enough.

Right now, at 7 turning 8, his interest in Tang So Do (financially aside) isn't a bad thing, provided it is keeping him fit and active and the head instructor isn't telling the kid he is a walking weapon. There are some decent schools, but..then again, he's 7 so it is more an activity then a dedication to training.

I don't see the possibility of his injuring himself at either the TSD, TKD or GJJ school. At 7 he is much more flexible than you or I and will be fine, regardless as to where he trains. Take him to the GJJ school and the two of you watch a class and see if either or both of you like it.

Honestly, the most dangerous thing I have read from your post is a 7 year old fucking about with nunchucks. His bones and growth will be fine.

And welcome to the site. It is always good to see another father looking after their child.

CrackFox
3/24/2011 5:00pm,
The kids’ turning eight, and I've read some stuff on this site that says it might not be good for his bones/growth. [/FONT]

Is there any sort of consensus on that? What are people's thoughts on this situation?
Where did you read that? I believe with kids they often limit them to just wrestling for position and don't allow them to go for subs in free rolling. Maybe this is what you're thinking of? BJJ is not going to be any worse on bone development or stuff like that than judo would. If anything judo is worse as you're going to take more bumps.

Also, please don't mess with the font settings when you post.

Permalost
3/24/2011 5:06pm,
If you browse around a bit, you'll see that it's kinda funny to blame Bullshido for NOT steering you towards judo. It's cheap and widely available, you see.

It is Fake
3/24/2011 5:11pm,
Since you are new, if you copy and paste your font is fine don't worry about that at all.

me_too
3/24/2011 5:17pm,
So a poster gave you bad advice not bullshido? Most of those threads have one or two posts of "sign up for anything" followed by 10 to 20 posts of what happens when they learn bad habits or enjoys the bad choice.

You have just become a victim of what we yell here, on a constant basis, called " read the whole damn thread." If he enjoys what he is doing and is active that is a good thing in the 21st century. You only have yourself to blame. Is the school that bad or is it the price?

Do you remember what thread?

Yes, just a random Bullshido member who seemed to make sense. I read the post a few months ago and don't really remember which one it was. It might of been a "Will teaching your kid striking or grappling get them in more trouble at school", and someone chimed in to say, "What does it matter. They'll probably quit after a few months anyways".

The advice wasn't necessarialy bad, it just didn't work as planned, which is why I used so many a's in the word, and latter said it wasn't.

Based on my kid's past behavior, I really didn't think he'd stay interested. I was wrong. So, now I will be needing to direct him to a different class unless I want him learning Tang So Do. Since I'm his father, I can get him excited enough to go to another place without much effort, but keeping him interested would depend on the new place. It would have to compete in a kid's mind with nunchucks and jumping kicks, but I think its doable.

The current school seems OK enough. I guess. Of course I don't really know much of anything about martial arts, not having taken any. The guy who owns the place is in shape, seems fluid when doing the various moves, and also seems to have a knack with kids. The instructor to student ratio seems has been about 1-3 during the kid classes these last few months. The other instructors (black belts) are in their mid teens.

It is Fake
3/24/2011 5:23pm,
Okay you missed the important question which has become more relevant with your newest post. Is it a money issue or something else? BJJ might not be cheaper and considering the size of your town may actually be the same or more.

As you admit to having no basis to critique a bad school or a good one I'll leave that alone. You said you have tried many things and the child loses interest. You found something the child likes and that it has held his interest.

So, what has you worked up? You have said nothing bad but the issue with cost. Yes, air kicking nunchaku keep kids interested. What is the rest of the class es like as he progresses. Sparring? Grappling?

me_too
3/24/2011 5:33pm,
Please tell us which county (with *only 1.1 Million people) you live in and we might better help you with some informational options. I live in a town of 50K and there is (now) a Judo option available to me, so I am thinking you might not have looked hard enough.

Right now, at 7 turning 8, his interest in Tang So Do (financially aside) isn't a bad thing, provided it is keeping him fit and active and the head instructor isn't telling the kid he is a walking weapon. There are some decent schools, but..then again, he's 7 so it is more an activity then a dedication to training.

I don't see the possibility of his injuring himself at either the TSD, TKD or GJJ school. At 7 he is much more flexible than you or I and will be fine, regardless as to where he trains. Take him to the GJJ school and the two of you watch a class and see if either or both of you like it.

Honestly, the most dangerous thing I have read from your post is a 7 year old fucking about with nunchucks. His bones and growth will be fine.

And welcome to the site. It is always good to see another father looking after their child.

Franklin County, Ohio

I found the university Judo club and a guy affialiated with Ameri-kan judo. No kid classes. I did see at least one instructor who said he offered private Judo lessons, but he didn't list Judo as one of his belts. Thats it. I did find a few other places whose instructors claimed Judo rank, but they did not offer any Judo classes of any kind.

When I emailed the Ameri-kan guy to double check about kid classes, he said he was unaware of any as well.

Snake Plissken
3/24/2011 5:35pm,
Yes, just a random Bullshido member who seemed to make sense. I read the post a few months ago and don't really remember which one it was. It might of been a "Will teaching your kid striking or grappling get them in more trouble at school", and someone chimed in to say, "What does it matter. They'll probably quit after a few months anyways".
CONTEXTUALLY speaking, that comment isn't incorrect, it was likely more a slap at kid's attention spans than validating one manner of training over another.


The advice wasn't necessarialy bad, it just didn't work as planned, which is why I used so many a's in the word, and latter said it wasn't.

Based on my kid's past behavior, I really didn't think he'd stay interested. I was wrong. So, now I will be needing to direct him to a different class unless I want him learning Tang So Do. Since I'm his father, I can get him excited enough to go to another place without much effort, but keeping him interested would depend on the new place. It would have to compete in a kid's mind with nunchucks and jumping kicks, but I think its doable.What specifically led you to the TSD school in the first place?
What specifically will lead you away from the TSD school?
Might I suggest, before you get the young man all geeking out on another style, the two of you go visit these other gyms, first? Nothing gets a kid exciting like seeing and showing rather than telling and explaining. Think about science. Would you rather I tell you about and explain reactions or show you what happens?


The current school seems OK enough. I guess. Of course I don't really know much of anything about martial arts, not having taken any. The guy who owns the place is in shape, seems fluid when doing the various moves, and also seems to have a knack with kids. The instructor to student ratio seems has been about 1-3 during the kid classes these last few months. The other instructors (black belts) are in their mid teens.Three teenage blackbelts, unless they are like 17-19 and look like they could handle some ****, is the most concerning. I wouldn't want my kid, at age 15, thinking he's a badass and acting that way. Right now, if you are OK where your kid is, use this time to allow him to continue to be exposed to training. Since soccer/baseball/football is a no-go with him....at least this is a physical activity, right?
Use this time to research what is available to you, what exactly they are and what the costs are, so you don't regret your choice, like you are now.
If you wish for us to help, you can let us know that county and we can google what is available to you and posters with previous experience in that training can weigh-in.
Then, you and your son can visit the gyms or schools and see, first hand, what it is and he can try out an intro lesson.

EDIT:
I see you posted after this it is Franklin County.
Perhaps a Moderator can change the thread title to "KIDS CLASS SUGGESTIONS FRANKLIN COUNTY OHIO"?

I think poster Beorn was from this area, wasn't he?

me_too
3/24/2011 5:36pm,
Where did you read that? I believe with kids they often limit them to just wrestling for position and don't allow them to go for subs in free rolling. Maybe this is what you're thinking of? BJJ is not going to be any worse on bone development or stuff like that than judo would. If anything judo is worse as you're going to take more bumps.

Also, please don't mess with the font settings when you post.

From what I remeber from the thread, it said that some (Judo?) organization had done a few studies and determined it could damage the growthplates in their bones. I'm no medical profession and have no idea if this is true. I also could be mis-remembering it.

CrackFox
3/24/2011 5:45pm,
From what I remeber from the thread, it said that some (Judo?) organization had done a few studies and determined it could damage the growthplates in their bones. I'm no medical profession and have no idea if this is true. I also could be mis-remembering it.
Why don't you maybe look it up or something?

me_too
3/24/2011 5:52pm,
Okay you missed the important question which has become more relevant with your newest post. Is it a money issue or something else? BJJ might not be cheaper and considering the size of your town may actually be the same or more.

As you admit to having no basis to critique a bad school or a good one I'll leave that alone. You said you have tried many things and the child loses interest. You found something the child likes and that it has held his interest.

So, what has you worked up? You have said nothing bad but the issue with cost. Yes, air kicking nunchaku keep kids interested. What is the rest of the class es like as he progresses. Sparring? Grappling?

The money is doable. However, I like the idea of getting the most bang for the buck.. By that, I mean, lets say there is two options

1. The kid likes it
2. The kid likes it and it might help him with self-defense, etc. as he gets older

While 1. is OK, I would prefer to spend it on 2. The only reason I'm thinking 2., is it looks like the kid might be taking after his mother, size-wise. While I'm 6'-3 220, shes 5'-nothing. He might be too.

Why not get a twofer if I can? From what I've been reading on this site, it looks like out of the local options, the jui-jitsu might give the most chance of that.

The existing class does have sparing, twice a month, for about 15 minutes, where the kids have foam helmets, chest protectors, and gloves. One day a week the guy has a class called 'grppling' that I have not asked about yet. I am not sure if he teaches it or not. I also found out he has been trying to get someone to come in and teach a Muy Thai class.

He is also not brainwashing the kids that they are turning into deadly ninja's or anything. I remeber his saying during one class something to the effect, "This technique (jumping kick) would not be very effective if you find yourself in a fight. Can you tell me why? But we need to learn how to do it anyway"

me_too
3/24/2011 6:01pm,
Why don't you maybe look it up or something?

I did(originally), and I read it too. The only reason I could think to look it up again is if I actually did think I wasn't remembering correctly. It was about damage to growthplates. It was Judo that didn't like certain teachings because of it. The comment was also made that BJJ essentially ignored the findings.

The point seemed contoversial in the thread and the equivocation in my post was just politeness. That way if someone disagreed, they could just tell themselves "He must be remembering wrong"

DCS
3/24/2011 6:18pm,
This thread?
http://www.bullshido.net/forums/archive/index.php/t-85665-p-2.html

CrackFox
3/24/2011 6:22pm,
I did(originally), and I read it too. The only reason I could think to look it up again is if I actually did think I wasn't remembering correctly.
So now you do remember it correctly?

Look, it's your kid's safety here, for the love of god, would you put the effort in and do your research instead of going around saying "em, I think I remember some guy on a website saying something about something or other, I'm not sure though. Actually I am sure."


The point seemed contoversial in the thread and the equivocation in my post was just politeness. That way if someone disagreed, they could just tell themselves "He must be remembering wrong"
That bit of "politeness" completely changes the meaning of your post.

Yes or no, did you look into the study? Properly? Have you checked if it's findings apply to your local BJJ school. I only know one guy who teaches BJJ to kids, and he doesn't allow subs below a certain age - they just practice making the shape but don't lock them in and don't use them in sparring. That's only one guy, I have no idea if that is common practice. What is the local BJJ place's policy on young kids and locks?