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Kouch
3/04/2011 6:27pm,
for all the chunners, have you guys ever tried to actually apply your wing chun to anybody that DOESNT do wing chun? 90% of the time they dont give you elbow pressure, nor does your opponent "stick" to you. which almost limits you to, for example, a tan/pak da. and trapping happens (atleast in my case) VERY RARELY. what almost ends up happening is that we just start timing them and swinging punches.

My question is how have you fellas been able to apply your wing chun to someone who doesnt do wing chun? and how has that affected your training?

Thanks :)

ty5
3/04/2011 6:46pm,
I used to do Wing Chun, when I started Wu Shu Kwan to my surprise I found that I subconsciously carried a lot of the style across with me, especially the stance during sparring (square on & rigid footwork) and I found it to be a real hinderance, I am not sure what situations the Wing Chun stance was actually designed for, but in a free sparring situation it is of no use at all.

It is Fake
3/04/2011 6:48pm,
Nope, not this dead horse in the CMA forum. Nice try though.

Kovacs
3/04/2011 6:59pm,
I have with Wing Tsun rather than WC and generally it was a disaster. It was fun practicing on mates who didn't know what to do, chi sau and trapping looked dead cool. Practically it wasn't so good, chainpunching people without warning worked well but all it was was a glorified sucker punch. I tried using it against a pretty decent boxer my own age, roughly my own height, fitness and weight, we both ha equal intent and it didn't go well for me. It could be that I didn't have the 'real' Chun but from what I've seen no one else had either.

Generally the Chuns too reliant on ropey theory and no real application, it's always been like that and that's why it always fares so badly against more robust styles.

ermghoti
3/04/2011 7:12pm,
Wing chun has a soft plastic applicator.

Kouch
3/04/2011 8:04pm,
Kovacs-im glad were on the same page haha

it is really nice when i can pull of a good trap or really get them jammed up. but i find the hardest part is when your fighting someone that has atleast some kind of experience, and their punches are snapped out. like a boxer for example. and its hard to maintain that bridge if their pressure is suddenly gone. im currently working with some boxers i used to train with to try and make this clearer for me!

CaseyRyback
3/04/2011 9:47pm,
Wing Chun ultimately does not seem practical. After practicing it for over a year I realized while fun, I would never use a majority of what I learned. There was also waaaay too much small man beating large man fantasy going on. Most students were skinny dudes under the impression that chain punching would intimidate a larger trained boxer into submission.

Gezere
3/06/2011 1:36am,
I will still give WC **** but at the last Throwdown their were some chunners there that did pretty decently in the stand up phase. I mauled them over all, but that happens to almost everyone, but they did come with the idea to test themselves and learn. They did some good things and some bad things but at least they weren't sticking their head sand an thinking they were the uber deadly.

wingchunx2z
3/07/2011 1:03pm,
for all the chunners, have you guys ever tried to actually apply your wing chun to anybody that DOESNT do wing chun? 90% of the time they dont give you elbow pressure, nor does your opponent "stick" to you. which almost limits you to, for example, a tan/pak da. and trapping happens (atleast in my case) VERY RARELY. what almost ends up happening is that we just start timing them and swinging punches.

My question is how have you fellas been able to apply your wing chun to someone who doesnt do wing chun? and how has that affected your training?

Thanks :)

What I would reccomend for you is to first outline your goal. as an example: if you want to tan da a punch then move in and launch a double punch lop sao commbination then you need to focus on that and then get a boxer to work with you and start slow. Don't jsut try it out in sparring without developing a game plan for how to land it. Figure out how the boxer is punching what angles he's using when he usually throws that punch ect. Then try to apply your response to that attack in an isolated environment. After this you can ask him to start adding in feints and other punches but only once you are now comfortable responding to a decent speed attack and launching your combo.

Mr.Miyagi
3/09/2011 3:21am,
I had The Chun, for a while, then I had a dose of The Reality. It's kinda like a vaccine, gets rid of all that stuff that clouds up your head and lets The Chun get in and build a nest.

The rigid body structure and lack of foot movement is bad enough, but it's worse that there are styles that take all The Chun has to offer and gives it back with decades of pressure testing (Muay Thai + Boxing)—'good' Chun has more in common with these (dug, because it works) than with its own hideous man-love-incest-babies.

Everything that would make The Chun good is not taught, urgh, the memories...the Abyss...All those wasted years suffering from The Chun, and all it took was a single dose of WAKE THE **** UP.

(PS. The only thing it has kinda helped with is fighting off grips, and also sometimes trapping arms while in mount...but most of that is wrist rotation + learning over years.)

SourceOfCombat
3/09/2011 1:57pm,
I studied WT and some VT for a time and was assistant instructor levels there, for what its worth. I attempted to test out what I had learned in a local MMA gym. As a test, I tried kick-sparring, then just hands, then just clinch sparring. Hoping i would better isolate useful techniques by range, first, and then move on to free-sparring. I found that the notion of sticking to my opponent while clinching and trying to feel his intent is a very nice attribute to have even if the original WT/VT/WC techniques are not used. To say that no one but the Chun understands elbow pressure, sticking and feeling your opponents intent, reacting by sense of touch is horribly incorrect. Muay Thai, greco, and judo do also even if they don't call it 'sticking'.

In short, i use about 2-3 techniques in the clinch that i use that i don't see anyone else using. But that's it. Some techniques i found to be similar to what was already being taught at the MMA/MT/Judo etc. but the method was more refined as its been tested, so i changed.

My biggest complaint about the Chun, even with the techniques i still use, is that there is no actual live sparring to test it out. It took me awhile to start to use the Chun techniques i still hold onto while clinch sparring as i needed to get over the fight stress, first.

ADM
3/10/2011 12:42am,
I have a friend that did it for almost 5 years. We sparred ... and I mauled him a bit. Fast forward a while and I still mauled him (but more so). But here's the thing ... I entered a lot of tournaments, got my arse handed to me in some fights, but ultimately I was learning how to fight and taking the hard road to get there.

For someone who was still learning how to fight, he wouldn't do so bad against. And he actually used WC not some shitty-looking-thisisWCbutlookslkikebadKICKBOXING variation.

He eventually stopped doing it, no idea why he just just stopped.