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RaiderFunk
11/12/2010 12:01pm,
YouTube - 10 Commandments of Self Defense (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9e8xNmi77PM&feature=player_embedded#)

I have a huge problem with the first example...there was no need to even have the confrontation. Has anyone heard of or trained with this guy. Seems very Krav Maga -ish to me.

Permalost
11/12/2010 12:15pm,
That's David James from Vee Arnis Jitsu. I first heard of him when someone gave me an old VHS they came across called "Take it to Them/Em". I'd say a lot of his advice is on the better end of the RBSD spectrum. For self defense, I think it's good that they start with a verbal confrontation (I've never practiced that way but it makes sense). In his videos he really seems to crank on his training partners, hit them etc and I think that's not cool.

CoffeeFan
11/12/2010 1:24pm,
I actually think he makes a lot of good points in this video. I don't necessarily agree with all of it but he definitely has a better idea of things then a lot of other self defense instructors.

Rexley
11/12/2010 1:29pm,
YouTube - 10 Commandments of Self Defense (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9e8xNmi77PM&feature=player_embedded#)

I have a huge problem with the first example...there was no need to even have the confrontation.

Agreed. He could have just walked away. He winds up looking more like the attacker instead of the defender.

Oh well...at least there were no lunge punches in the video.

RaiderFunk
11/12/2010 1:30pm,
I agree with you Coffeecan...I just always pray that I hear someone say #1...just walk the hell away and let it go. It is the most effective technique and no one talks about it. It is not a foregone conclusion.

Permalost
11/12/2010 1:32pm,
I agree with you Coffeecan...I just always pray that I hear someone say #1...just walk the hell away and let it go. It is the most effective technique and no one talks about it. It is not a foregone conclusion.
I dunno, I think everyone talks about it, even David James. But when studying martial arts, you're learning how to fight.

kayman101
11/12/2010 9:38pm,
It was worth 8 minutes and 37 seconds of my life to receive the following pearl: "Be generous with the pain." That's some poetic ****!!!

Did anyone else notice that he almost gassed out while talking about a fight? I can only imagine how much wind that guy would suck after a 3 minute round.

W. Rabbit
11/12/2010 10:01pm,
YouTube - 10 Commandments of Self Defense (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9e8xNmi77PM&feature=player_embedded#)

I have a huge problem with the first example...there was no need to even have the confrontation. Has anyone heard of or trained with this guy. Seems very Krav Maga -ish to me.

I enjoyed his dissertations until right at the end when he said
"we can guarantee 100% a student when you train with us in a shorter period of time we will teach you how to successfully defend yourself better than any other system on the planet", queue rap music. Bitch, please.

Pimp slap at 5:05? Definitely works in the street.

He also needs to drink less coffee, he's sweating just talking about his commandments...

goodlun
11/12/2010 10:08pm,
I don't know I am not sold on anyone that is going to make "fighting" and "self defense" mutually exclusive. I will agree that you have different goals in focusing in on one or the other but the road to being effective in either one with different stops along the way.

Permalost
11/12/2010 10:49pm,
Did anyone else notice that he almost gassed out while talking about a fight? I can only imagine how much wind that guy would suck after a 3 minute round.

I appreciate that he seems to put so much energy and passion into teaching. As a self defense instructor, he also seems to generate a sense of urgency. Contrast this with the very relaxed coaching styles of some martial arts instructors. I've studied under both types, and personally I prefer the more relaxed style (my current teacher is an old man). However, I also believe that the more down to business teachers were probably more productive. My first kung fu instructor was a former Marine who was always saying "outstanding", and when he was coaching, it was very go go go and loud and energetic like David James there. If you have the personality type that you want to be put through the wringer every training session, you'll probably want a coach who brings a lot of energy to the table.

gregaquaman
11/13/2010 2:41am,
I dunno, I think everyone talks about it, even David James. But when studying martial arts, you're learning how to fight.

My whole veiw on good RBSF is quality basic core fighting with added on de escalation, awareness and street smarts.

If you go through a police,army or security courses a lot of time is put into how to approach a situation or you exit strategy. This is the sort of street vs sport that I agree with.

Edit for a quick rant.
One of the things that shits the pants of me is when people say "The best defence is to run away" now lets stand here and hit people more.
My veiw is if you use that line put some thought into how you are going to achive that. Because like any thing else I bet there is a trick to doing it well.

MAGIC HATE BALL
11/13/2010 3:11am,
Well, he does teach out of Flatbush in Crooklyn. Too damn far away.

DdlR
11/13/2010 9:12am,
One of the things that shits the pants of me is when people say "The best defence is to run away" now lets stand here and hit people more.
My veiw is if you use that line put some thought into how you are going to achive that. Because like any thing else I bet there is a trick to doing it well.

502 Server Error (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-gDsz7TB7BA)

JSK_83
11/13/2010 10:05am,
This guy does have some good ideas, but they could be just a little bit better

hungryjoe
11/13/2010 11:08am,
This guy does have some good ideas, but they could be just a little bit better

As could your posts.

maofas
11/13/2010 12:06pm,
I've done a little bit of Vee-jitsu. It's not what I was looking for, but it was fairly okay. I thought the two instructors were very talented.

The main thing I didn't like was that they spent an awful lot of time on your standard attacker does one move while tori kicks the **** out of him with a 3-5 move combo type drills, but they acknowledged that it was just to get an idea of how one technique or position transitions into another and not necessarily how a fight was going to play out. The techniques themselves were good (no exploding heart punches or punching people in the foot), but there's a ton of small joint manipulation stuff and if you don't like that sort of thing (it's not my cup of tea either) you're not going to enjoy Vee-jitsu. They had a very heavy emphasis on hitting the person first to soften them up before applying the lock at least.

They also did live drilling and sometimes free-sparring too, however, the vast amount of wristlocky type material in the system couldn't be used in sparring and it wound up looking like medium contact super-basic bodyshot Karate and super-basic Judo sparring. We did some randori unarmed vs. training knives, and everyone got cut to ribbons most of the time, but I thought it was cool they weren't afraid to show us the reality of just how difficult it was to deal with a knife.

Basic Judo throws (osoto, ogoshi, seo) were drilled. My Judo instructors definitely have a much more in-depth understanding of them and know way more variations, but they were not taught badly. The only thing they ever showed me that was "wrong" was not pointing the toes on osoto. Definitely a lot better than all the shitty-ass throws I see done in krotty schools on YouTube. This was a long time ago, but I don't remember them drilling any groundwork.

I'm pretty sure there was some stick and cane stuff in the system as well, but I never got to do any of that and wouldn't have any background to say if it was good or bad anyways.

Edit: Oh and regarding the cranking of locks on compliant partners. I did a couple of demos with them and I guarantee you they're hamming it up for the camera. In class, you were more likely to get transitioned into a different lock (and pretty much made to dance around the room) every time you tapped than have the same lock cranked further, and at least half of those times we brought it on ourselves by resisting when we were supposed to let the guy compliantly demo a technique for the class. It was all very good-natured horseplay IMO.