View Poll Results: Underrated techniques

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  • Headlock

    9 3.64%
  • Front Kick

    48 19.43%
  • Side Kick

    28 11.34%
  • Backfist

    20 8.10%
  • Knifehand

    7 2.83%
  • Ridgehand

    8 3.24%
  • Wrist locks

    22 8.91%
  • Throws ( Trips n Hip throws)

    60 24.29%
  • Spearhand

    5 2.02%
  • Forearm Strike ( Not elbow)

    40 16.19%
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  1. #131

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    114
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I chose the edge of the hand. It a tool often recomended in military combatives for several reasons. It can be thrown from almost any angle, at short or long range, standing, clinching or on the ground. It can be used to strike any body part with minimum risk of hand injury. It's non telegraphic and can be used repeatedly on the same or varying targets. Best tool against the wrists (when someone grabs you), the biceps , collarbones (can shatter them) and the neck (a strike on tha carotid arteries can drop anybody, to the throat or nape of the neck can easily maim or even kill). Very easy to train on a punching bag.

  2. #132
    I'm grindin' 'till I'm tired...

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    1,492
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by velomaster
    I chose the edge of the hand. It a tool often recomended in military combatives for several reasons. It can be thrown from almost any angle, at short or long range, standing, clinching or on the ground. It can be used to strike any body part with minimum risk of hand injury. It's non telegraphic and can be used repeatedly on the same or varying targets. Best tool against the wrists (when someone grabs you), the biceps , collarbones (can shatter them) and the neck (a strike on tha carotid arteries can drop anybody, to the throat or nape of the neck can easily maim or even kill). Very easy to train on a punching bag.
    I agree with you except the bolded part. In my personal experience edge hand techniques are slightly more telegraphic/easier to block or counter than other hand techniques for the same situations. The advantages you list are convincing and valid but I have to say that I have not been able to get edge hand strikes to work for me, nor has my sparring partner had much luck with them against me.

    I'll be the first to admit I'm no expert in this domain, however, so my difference of opinion may be due to inexperience with "real" knife hand techniques.

    I'm still working on my knife hand on focus mitts and soon on the heavy bag but I wonder if I'll ever get much use from it.

  3. #133
    IF I POST ONE MORE CRAPPY THREAD I WILL GET LOCKED IN TROLLSHIDO FOR A MONTH Bullshido Newbie

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    132
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by PPlate
    How do traditional stances apply to actual fightin? (I'm asking with an open mind, not to mock).
    You know how on this forum everyone just throws around all their secrets?

    Well. I don't.

    If you have an open mind however, consider the possibility that the people that developed the stances weren't complete morons, and things such as groin attacks, balance, speed of movement were things they were more than slightly well accquainted with.

    That being so, maybe there's a way the stances are used which is effective, as opposed to standing in one of the various horse stances and saying "Hiyyahh! I am the kung fu!"

  4. #134

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,083
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    >>
    You know how on this forum everyone just throws around all their secrets?

    Well. I don't.
    <<

    Horse stances are secrets?

    >>
    If you have an open mind however, consider the possibility that the people that developed the stances weren't complete morons, and things such as groin attacks, balance, speed of movement were things they were more than slightly well accquainted with.
    <<

    I will consider it if you will explain how traditional stances can work in real fighting...seems you're the only person so far who knows this secret.

    >>
    That being so, maybe there's a way the stances are used which is effective, as opposed to standing in one of the various horse stances and saying "Hiyyahh! I am the kung fu!"<<

    Care to explain how?

  5. #135
    I'm grindin' 'till I'm tired...

    Join Date
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    1,492
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by SamuraiJack
    You know how on this forum everyone just throws around all their secrets?

    Well. I don't.

    If you have an open mind however, consider the possibility that the people that developed the stances weren't complete morons, and things such as groin attacks, balance, speed of movement were things they were more than slightly well accquainted with.

    That being so, maybe there's a way the stances are used which is effective, as opposed to standing in one of the various horse stances and saying "Hiyyahh! I am the kung fu!"
    Wow, SamuraiJack, your restraint regarding your horse-stance secrets is impressing and intruiging me. What fantastic techniques are hidden behind your wise old brow?

    Seriously now, it's a bit controversial to assert that a horse stance is something that ought to be done during a fight. Don't expect to be taken too seriously if you only make a cryptic comment about it. I'd say that if you're not going to back up this radical claim with some sort of reasoned explanation, you'd probably be better off not posting this sort of "man of mystery" stuff, because it's not the person to whom you are speaking that is being made to look silly by this post, if you catch my drift.

  6. #136

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    114
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Epicurus
    I agree with you except the bolded part. In my personal experience edge hand techniques are slightly more telegraphic/easier to block or counter than other hand techniques for the same situations. The advantages you list are convincing and valid but I have to say that I have not been able to get edge hand strikes to work for me, nor has my sparring partner had much luck with them against me.

    I'll be the first to admit I'm no expert in this domain, however, so my difference of opinion may be due to inexperience with "real" knife hand techniques.

    I'm still working on my knife hand on focus mitts and soon on the heavy bag but I wonder if I'll ever get much use from it.
    First, I don't consider myself an "expert" on anything but here is what I've learned: Edge hand strkes target body parts that are illegal to hit in most combat sports. The body mechanics of the strke is identical to the hammer fist (another one of my favorites particularly on the ground or when someone is grabbing you). I usually train them on mitts and the heavy bag. I train for two different ranges long swinging ones (more telegraphic) and short choppy ones (non telegraphic). With the long ones I look for power And i start with 20 vertical strkes, 20 horizontal and 20 diagonal with each hand gradually increasing the power of the strikes (i always warm up and mobilize my shoulders before to avoid rotator cuff injury) . With the short strikes I do the same but I look for speed (2 or 3 strikes per second). And then I repeat the whole routine at near maximum power. For the ground, I mount the bag And i throw short quick strikes from different angles. In mitt sparring I practice sriking while i'm moving towards my opponent sides (left side right hand strike, right side left hand strike. In self defence situations you can fake crossing you arms or touching you hair strike and suddenly strike many times at the same or different angles. When someone grabs my wrists I immedialy strike their wrists at full power ( it works like a charm). You can also practice riccocheting strikes like wrist/face or bicep/neck or stomach/neck, etc. Long swinging strikes can be used to hit someone who's behind you (I've done it!) turning into the strike, or to hit someone's nape or back from behind or when he's trying to tackle you (strike before or after sprawling). The beauty of this tool is that you don't need pimpoint accuracy. It 'll hurt wherever it lands!(try that with your knuckles!).
    Happy training.

  7. #137

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,083
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by velomaster
    First, I don't consider myself an "expert" on anything but here is what I've learned: Edge hand strkes target body parts that are illegal to hit in most combat sports. The body mechanics of the strke is identical to the hammer fist (another one of my favorites particularly on the ground or when someone is grabbing you). I usually train them on mitts and the heavy bag. I train for two different ranges long swinging ones (more telegraphic) and short choppy ones (non telegraphic). With the long ones I look for power And i start with 20 vertical strkes, 20 horizontal and 20 diagonal with each hand gradually increasing the power of the strikes (i always warm up and mobilize my shoulders before to avoid rotator cuff injury) . With the short strikes I do the same but I look for speed (2 or 3 strikes per second). And then I repeat the whole routine at near maximum power. For the ground, I mount the bag And i throw short quick strikes from different angles. In mitt sparring I practice sriking while i'm moving towards my opponent sides (left side right hand strike, right side left hand strike. In self defence situations you can fake crossing you arms or touching you hair strike and suddenly strike many times at the same or different angles. When someone grabs my wrists I immedialy strike their wrists at full power ( it works like a charm). You can also practice riccocheting strikes like wrist/face or bicep/neck or stomach/neck, etc. Long swinging strikes can be used to hit someone who's behind you (I've done it!) turning into the strike, or to hit someone's nape or back from behind or when he's trying to tackle you (strike before or after sprawling). The beauty of this tool is that you don't need pimpoint accuracy. It 'll hurt wherever it lands!(try that with your knuckles!).
    Happy training.
    Velomaster,
    Will you happen to have any sparring videos that you won't mind sharing? Thanks.

  8. #138
    WhiteShark's Avatar
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    Sep 2003
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    Atlanta GA
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    9,167
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    This thread has degraded to epic crap levels. Also, whoever started it forgot to put an end date so it gets bumped everytime someone votes. LOCKED FOR GREAT JUSTICE!1

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