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  1. #1

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    How to study boxing on your own?

    Okay guys, not exactly. I will be joining a boxing gym but that won't be for six months (Basically I'm in the middle of nowhere but I'll be moving to the city near a boxing gym early next year). I want to know if I can prepare for boxing by not only upping my general fitness but by learning some basic concepts.

    I know that I may be putting myself at risk of learning lots of bad habits that’ll be a bitch to unlearn later on but I want to learn SOMETHING. I want to be primed for learning.

    I’m just wondering if I stick to the simplest, most basic aspects of boxing and use a comprehensive DVD series + “The 10 commandments of boxing”, as a guide to carefully monitor and evaluate how I’m doing will I at least be a quarter as good as people who train under supervision in the same amount of time?

    My goal in the next six months would just be to increase my general fitness, strength and get some of the basics down like proper stance and basic punches/punch mechanics.

    My typical boxing workout would include: 1) Mirror training, practicing stance, rhythm, lateral and forward movement, throwing the different punches, defense/counterpunching, and using the images from my book, and the demonstrations from my DVDs to evaluate my form. I may even record my sessions here to get a clearer picture of what I'm doing wrong. And 2) Bagwork. Pretty much the same as above except with me whaling on a heavy bag. In the title boxing series there is a DVD dedicated to proper bagwork (and even one on proper hand wrapping for competitions). – And the typical jump rope training will be incorporated throughout my training.
    Here is a sample of what the instruction looks like in the DVDs:
    YouTube- Boxing stance training tutorial

    Oh and lastly, for footwork are agility ladders really all that great? One of the DVDs in the title boxing series delves into “quickness training”. The main tool the dude uses is an agility ladder. The exercises seem to be geared towards general athleticism, the guy doesn’t even seem to be a boxing coach. Do you guys think it will help with my footwork and speed later on?

    As far as general fitness is concerned, I’m also open to suggestions. At the moment I’m doing P90x just as a primer since I’m so badly out of shape. I’m hoping that after I finish this program I’ll be strong and fit enough to do some real strength training where I’ll actually have access to trainers who can help me on my squat/deadlift forms.

    Thanks. I hope I don't get raped for this post.

  2. #2
    Snake Plissken's Avatar
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    I would just do roadwork, jump rope and do sit-ups for the next six months.

  3. #3
    Soldiermedic's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    There is no raping in newbietown...its all consensual.

    Just work on your general fitness. There are so many little things that only an outside observer can pick up.

  4. #4
    gregaquaman's Avatar
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    If you want to hit the bag (And I know you do) you could probbly do 3 minute rounds of straight punching. 1 minute rest then 3 minutes of hooks. and so on.
    At least that way when you hit the gym you will still have bad technique but your arms will not fall off during training.

  5. #5
    MMAMickey's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    don't use those youtube videos if you ever want to hit with power.

    if you want to use youtube watch what the pros do and when you start training you'll begin to understand why they do it.

    other than that (as above) running is always good.

    I would also advise a strength routine such as http://www.stronglifts.com for the next six months. strength is just as big an advantage as technique under the right circumstances.
    "The hero and the coward both feel the same thing, but the hero projects his fear onto his opponent while the coward runs. 'Fear'. It's the same thing, but it's what you do with it that matters". - Cus D'Amato
    Spoiler:


  6. #6
    OZZ's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Make a conscious effort to incorporate head movement into your bag work..so throw a combo, weave your head from side to side..throw another combo, duck etc.
    This will help you get ready for when you are actually sparring and need to get you melon out of the way of a punch. It will also give you an idea of the amount of energy it takes to AVOID getting hit as well as trying to hit your opponent.It would be nice if Boxing were all about throwing punches, but becuase you are in the ring with someone trying to hit you as well, it is about avoiding punches just as much (if not more) than throwing them.
    And remember, elbows in..
    " If one wants to have a friend one must also want to wage war for him: and to wage war one must be capable of being an enemy." - Fr. Nietzsche 'On The Friend' Thus Spake Zarathustra

  7. #7

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    don't use those youtube videos if you ever want to hit with power.

    if you want to use youtube watch what the pros do and when you start training you'll begin to understand why they do it.

    other than that (as above) running is always good.
    They’re not youtube videos I’m studying from. I bought a series of 16 DVDs called Title Boxing. That video clip was just a sample of the type of things they go through.
    http://store.titleboxing.com/title-b...onal-dvds.html

    From what I have skimmed so far, me likely. I really liked the counterpunching DVD in particular. I can’t wait to actually do that with a partner. They went through the main types of jabs, different power punches and the different ways in which you could defend and counter them. It really exposed a layer of strategy that I had never been aware of in boxing. I always just saw it as a slugfest.



    Make a conscious effort to incorporate head movement into your bag work..so throw a combo, weave your head from side to side..throw another combo, duck etc.
    This will help you get ready for when you are actually sparring and need to get you melon out of the way of a punch. It will also give you an idea of the amount of energy it takes to AVOID getting hit as well as trying to hit your opponent.It would be nice if Boxing were all about throwing punches, but becuase you are in the ring with someone trying to hit you as well, it is about avoiding punches just as much (if not more) than throwing them.
    And remember, elbows in..
    Reading this only increases my confidence in these books and DVDs that I bought. That they’re actually useful. From what I’ve learned so far boxing is all about hitting someone without getting hit yourself, and punishing someone when they try to hit you. The DVDs and book go into great length about not only how to punch but how to avoid punches and how to move, rhythm, slip, move fluidly and quickly and so on and so forth (Well, not that great of detail. I'm having trouble moving around using the boxer's stance). In the workouts, and during bag work it’s recommended we move, move, move (with Rhythm), and throw counter punches as if we’re first slipping, or catching or parrying. Everything is broken down step by step.

    Is this advice solid for punching?
    1. Finish the punch where it started (at the chin) and 2. The non-throwing hand should touch the chin. And also 1) Pivot the foot of the hand you’re throwing and 2) Transfer your weight through the punch.

    If you want to hit the bag (And I know you do) you could probbly do 3 minute rounds of straight punching. 1 minute rest then 3 minutes of hooks. and so on.
    At least that way when you hit the gym you will still have bad technique but your arms will not fall off during training.
    Yes, I’m actually saving up for a heavy bag and a slip bag. I’m going to be as careful as I can be learning the form of each punch and I’m only going to even attempt only a basic jab, right, left hook and really focus on mastering these three simple punches as best as I can. I know my form will still probably be ****, but I wanna hit something so badly. But if anything, I just really want to develop my stance, footwork, quickness, and mobility before I join up. Those are my priorities by far.

    Also, for what it’s worth this is the table of contents of the book that I’m primarly using to supplement the DVDs, just so you know what topics they cover and what they think is important for a novice to learn. Anyone else read "10 Commandements of Boxing?"
    1. Stance and rhythm – Fight from the boxer’s stance with rhythm
    2. Footwork – Learn to move skillfully in all directions
    3. Range – Know and master your range
    4. Laws of punching – Obey the Laws of punching and punch power
    5. The jab – Make the jab your best punch
    6. Punch mechanics for fundamental punches – Master the mechanics of the major punches
    7. Defense and counters – Master the defences against each punch and know how to counter every attack
    8. Angles – Angle in and out on different lines
    9. Putting it all together – Blend and master offensive and defensive skills through focused sparring drills
    10. Making a plan – Follow a plan every round, be it workout, sparring or competition

    The DVDs I think provides more detail into each of these so they compliment each other well. Of course I’ll probably get the most out of both of them once someone competent is instructing me.

    So what do you guys think of agility ladders for improving quickness, movement, reaction and foot work?

  8. #8
    alex's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    waste of time, youll just learn shitty habits doing it yourself. hit the weights instead.

  9. #9
    Snake Plissken's Avatar
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    The DVDs I think provides more detail into each of these so they compliment each other well. Of course I’ll probably get the most out of both of them once someone competent is instructing me.
    actually you will really only get something out of them once your trainer is working with you and it will likely only be a short window where you get something out of it.

    Since circumstances have it so you cannot go to a gym, using things like agility ladders are probably a better idea then watching these DVDs, *seeing* what they are doing and *thinking* you are doing it right. There is tons of small details you will be missing. Work on the roadwork, the ropework, the bagwork, the conditioning and don't get too entrenched in the DVDs.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snake Plissken View Post
    actually you will really only get something out of them once your trainer is working with you and it will likely only be a short window where you get something out of it.

    Since circumstances have it so you cannot go to a gym, using things like agility ladders are probably a better idea then watching these DVDs, *seeing* what they are doing and *thinking* you are doing it right. There is tons of small details you will be missing. Work on the roadwork, the ropework, the bagwork, the conditioning and don't get too entrenched in the DVDs.
    The DVDs actually have quite a lot of exercises designed for developing speed and explosiveness. That's where I got the notion of doing agility ladder drills in the first place. Though unforutunately a lot of those drills require a partner/medicine ball. So I'll just do the ones that don't require much equipment i.e. ladder.

    Lord knows I've tried to compromise and look for halfway decent gyms that I could go to once a week. I was willing to commute 2.5 hours to go to two of them. But one of them turned out to be a "boxercise" gym with ludicrous prices to boot. The other one's "boxing instructor" was a black belt in kungfu! Whatever the Hell that means.

    Well, thanks for all the advice everyone I will stick mostly to strength training and general conditioning. I'm still gonna try and learn a little but though. One of the p90x DVDs involves "Kenpo" training where we're required to kick and punch the air for like an hour and a half. So I'd much rather work on my punches in the mirror, do bagwork, and skip rope drills on that particular day.

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