226182 Bullies, 3932 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 1 to 10 of 20
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. Craig Jenkins is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    332

    Posted On:
    8/13/2010 8:23am


     Style: Uechi Ryu, Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    McMaster Study: Building muscle doesn't require lifting heavy weights

    "These results suggest that low-load high volume resistance exercise is more effective in inducing acute muscle anabolism than high-load low volume or work matched resistance exercise modes."



    Building muscle doesn't require lifting heavy weights: study

    August 11, 2010
    Current gym dogma holds that to build muscle size you need to lift heavy weights. However, a new study conducted at McMaster University has shown that a similar degree of muscle building can be achieved by using lighter weights. The secret is to pump iron until you reach muscle fatigue.



    "Rather than grunting and straining to lift heavy weights, you can grab something much lighter but you have to lift it until you can't lift it anymore," says Stuart Phillips, associate professor of kinesiology at McMaster University. "We're convinced that growing muscle means stimulating your muscle to make new muscle proteins, a process in the body that over time accumulates into bigger muscles."


    Phillips praised lead author and senior Ph.D. student Nicholas Burd for masterminding the project that showed it's really not the weight that you lift but the fact that you get muscular fatigue that's the critical point in building muscle.

    . The study used light weights that represented a percentage of what the subjects could lift. The heavier weights were set to 90% of a person's best lift and the light weights at a mere 30% of what people could lift. "It's a very light weight," says Phillips noting that the 90-80% range is usually something people can lift from 5-10 times before fatigue sets in. At 30%, Burd reported that subjects could lift that weight at least 24 times before they felt fatigue.


    "We're excited to see where this new paradigm will lead," says Phillips, adding that these new data have practical significance for gym enthusiasts but more importantly for people with compromised skeletal muscle mass, such as the elderly, patients with cancer, or those who are recovering from trauma, surgery, or even stroke.

    The findings are published in PLoS ONE.

    More information: http://www.plosone … pone.0012033
    Last edited by Craig Jenkins; 8/13/2010 8:48am at .
  2. Kintanon is offline
    Kintanon's Avatar

    Yes, I am smarter than you are.

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Athens, Ga
    Posts
    5,683

    Posted On:
    8/13/2010 9:09am

    supporting memberstaff
     Style: TKD, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    This is not new information. No one is going to tell you that in order to have visible large muscles you should left high weight low rep. They will tell you that in order to improve your maximum strength you should lift high weight, low rep. If you want to look like a bodybuilder then you can lift low weight high rep all day long. If you want to be able to pick up a 500lb boulder and put it on a pedestal then no amount of lifting 100lbs will do it for you.
  3. Scrapper is offline
    Scrapper's Avatar

    Fear and bullets.

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Dayville, Connecticut, United States
    Posts
    4,286

    Posted On:
    8/13/2010 9:28am

    staff
     Style: MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    in other news, water is wet.
    And lo, Kano looked down upon the field and saw the multitudes. Amongst them were the disciples of Uesheba who were greatly vexed at his sayings. And Kano spake: "Do not be concerned with the mote in thy neighbor's eye, when verily thou hast a massive stick in thine ass".

    --Scrolls of Bujutsu: Chapter 5 vs 10-14.
  4. CarlosJesena is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Manila, Philippines
    Posts
    299

    Posted On:
    8/13/2010 9:32am


     Style: BJJ, TKD, Lifting+Cardio

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You do know that volume = hypertrophy right?

    Oh wait, no, you posted this article.
  5. Res Judicata is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,633

    Posted On:
    8/13/2010 10:50am


     Style: Judo & BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Here are two concepts for you: myofibrilar hypertrophy and scarcoplasmic hypertrophy. Lifting only heavy weights is actually suboptimal for mass gain -- everyone who knows anything knows this -- but heavy weights are the best way to get strong.

    That's also a stupidly designed study - 90 and 30 % RM? Really, those are the two options?

    90% of RM is damn heavy, especially if you're reasonably strong. You just can get the volume in you'd need for great hypertrophy (although you'll probably get some). But do it too much and your nervous system will fry.
  6. Franco is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    England
    Posts
    240

    Posted On:
    8/13/2010 11:19am


     Style: Weightlifting

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Surely you cant get big without lifting heavy ass weights and just fannying around with light ones?
  7. Res Judicata is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,633

    Posted On:
    8/13/2010 12:49pm


     Style: Judo & BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You can, if you go to do it to exhaustion. Most BB's use (for them) relatively light weights and high volume. But your strength won't keep up with appearances. Most pure bodybuilders are weaker than they look -- not that they're weak, just that they're not as strong as a comparable sized powerlifter, o-lifter, strongman competitor etc.

    It's complicated though. Heavy weights tend to give a "harder" look. And the stronger you are, the heavier weights you can use on volume-based work outs, which in turn gives you more training stimulus. Which is why it's a good idea to get strong before doing pure bodybuilding.
  8. Aodhan is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    166

    Posted On:
    8/13/2010 4:15pm


     Style: ATA TKD, Hapkido

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Res Judicata View Post
    You can, if you go to do it to exhaustion. Most BB's use (for them) relatively light weights and high volume. But your strength won't keep up with appearances. Most pure bodybuilders are weaker than they look -- not that they're weak, just that they're not as strong as a comparable sized powerlifter, o-lifter, strongman competitor etc.

    It's complicated though. Heavy weights tend to give a "harder" look. And the stronger you are, the heavier weights you can use on volume-based work outs, which in turn gives you more training stimulus. Which is why it's a good idea to get strong before doing pure bodybuilding.
    All you have to do to confirm this "study" is look at some of the power/endurance athletes. Cyclists have huge quads/calves. They aren't pushing heavy weights around, they are just pedaling thousands and thousands of times under medium loads.

    The heavy weights being a "harder look", you think that's due to fiber and/or ancillary muscle recruitment due to a heavier weight being closer to an isotonic movement than a lighter weight?

    John
  9. Emevas is offline
    Emevas's Avatar

    Dysfunctionally Strong

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Minot AFB, ND
    Posts
    6,788

    Posted On:
    8/13/2010 8:25pm

    supporting member
     Style: Boxing/Wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    This study demonstrates how poorly run most studies in exercise go.
    "Emevas,
    You're a scrapper, I like that."-Ronin69
  10. CarlosJesena is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Manila, Philippines
    Posts
    299

    Posted On:
    8/13/2010 8:41pm


     Style: BJJ, TKD, Lifting+Cardio

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Emevas View Post
    This study demonstrates how poorly run most studies in exercise go.
    I re-read the article, and I agree.


    It's as if those PhD's didn't know or understand much about the concepts involved in muscle fiber recruitment...
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.