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  1. Res Judicata is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/12/2010 2:58pm


     Style: Judo & BJJ

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Half guard passes

    I've been working on my half guard top game a bit lately, and I've found these two videos pretty helpful. Sure they're in Japanese, but it really doesn't matter.

    The first one comes from the Kosen set, I believe. It contains only passes. Note the "lockdown" passes at the end.

    YouTube- JUDO - Niju garami (halfguard) pass

    The second one is Kashiwazaki and it contains passes and few subs.

    YouTube- Judo - Hairi Kata (sweep) - Kashiwazaki
  2. PointyShinyBurn is online now
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    Gnarly King of Half-Guard

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    Posted On:
    8/12/2010 6:00pm

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     Style: BJJ

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    Quote Originally Posted by Res Judicata View Post
    The second one is Kashiwazaki and it contains passes and few subs.
    The one you posted is all sweeps, I believe this is the one you wanted:
    YouTube- Judo - niju garami (halfguard) pass - Kashiwazaki

    The one he shows starting at about 8:00 is money, I've used it with a lot of success sparring in BJJ.
  3. BKR is online now
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    My dog is cuter and smarter than yours.

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    Posted On:
    8/12/2010 9:48pm

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     Style: Kodokan Judo

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    I use the same one extensively in Judo, and teach it to my students. I've used something similar in BJJ practice as well. I love the keylock tiedown, and use it in many scenarios.

    Ben
  4. BKR is online now
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    Posted On:
    8/12/2010 9:52pm

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     Style: Kodokan Judo

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    And please realize the term "hairi kata" doesn't refer to sweeps (harai). Hairi kata are entry methods for throws or ne waza. Not sure if the person who labeled them "hairi kata" was thinking of "harai kata", which is not a term I have ever heard used by Japanese judoka to describe what are called "sweeps" in BJJ.

    Ben
  5. DKJr is offline
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    Fasten your seat belts, and prepare for lift off

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    Posted On:
    8/12/2010 10:01pm

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     Style: Combat Cuddling

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    Those niju garami passes (or Relson style passes cause that's where I learned it) are some of my main passes that have worked on people from spazzy whites to black belts. If the guy is focused on getting on his elbow and stiff arming you away that first method of gripping the belt and moving up high is a great counter. If they're a sneaky hip movement guard guy, you should try bringing your hips lower over their hips and keeping tight on them. This style has helped me a lot.
  6. Res Judicata is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/31/2010 10:03pm


     Style: Judo & BJJ

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    Thanks for posting the correct video.

    I'm now hitting that tie-off/ude garami pass all over the place in both Judo and BJJ. My Judo instructor has taught it -- I think he learned it from Kashiwazaki, actually -- so the experienced Judo guys know what's coming when I get the initial grip. But my BJJ instructor has yet to teach it and I don't think he does normally. Confusion sometimes ensues -- people fight off the arm under the head and think they've "won". Wrong.

    Ben is of course right about "hairi kata". "Hairu" (入る) means "to enter". For example, ofuro ni hairu (お風呂入る) means to "enter the bathtub ((o)furo)" i.e. to take a bath. Hairi kata are therefore entering techniques, or perhaps entries. I think the term is used for any entry technique, including turtle turnovers.
  7. BKR is online now
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    Posted On:
    9/01/2010 3:11pm

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     Style: Kodokan Judo

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    Quote Originally Posted by Res Judicata View Post
    Thanks for posting the correct video.

    I'm now hitting that tie-off/ude garami pass all over the place in both Judo and BJJ. My Judo instructor has taught it -- I think he learned it from Kashiwazaki, actually -- so the experienced Judo guys know what's coming when I get the initial grip. But my BJJ instructor has yet to teach it and I don't think he does normally. Confusion sometimes ensues -- people fight off the arm under the head and think they've "won". Wrong.

    Ben is of course right about "hairi kata". "Hairu" (入る) means "to enter". For example, ofuro ni hairu (お風呂入る) means to "enter the bathtub ((o)furo)" i.e. to take a bath. Hairi kata are therefore entering techniques, or perhaps entries. I think the term is used for any entry technique, including turtle turnovers.
    Thanks for the details on the Japanese translation.

    I've heard hairi kata used mostly for throwing, but I don't see why it won't work for katame waza as well.

    This kind of highlights the difference between BJJ and Judo in naming things. Very few of the guard passes, turtle turnovers, etc., in Judo have names, unlike in BJJ, where many of them,especially the more common ones, seem to have widely understood names.

    Ben
  8. Lu Tze is offline

    BJJ might make you a better ground fighter, but Judo will make you a better dancer.

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    Posted On:
    9/01/2010 3:14pm

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     Style: Judo

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    One of the things that BJJ has given Judo is a decent vernacular for things like that (Eddie Bravo aside, because what the ****).
  9. BKR is online now
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    Posted On:
    9/01/2010 5:01pm

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     Style: Kodokan Judo

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lu Tze View Post
    One of the things that BJJ has given Judo is a decent vernacular for things like that (Eddie Bravo aside, because what the ****).
    I agree. One thing that has been frustrating for me teaching Judo is the lack of standardized vocabulary for ne waza. Students do get frustrated in trying to remember things for testing purposes. It may be an western mind thing that needs to categorize and have names? Or maybe the intuitive/immersion method of learning in Japanese martial arts, at least.

    I started BJJ, and found names for all the sweeps/reversals I'd been doing for years.

    Ben
  10. judoka_uk is offline
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    Posted On:
    9/01/2010 5:36pm

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     Style: Judo

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    Quote Originally Posted by BKR View Post
    I agree. One thing that has been frustrating for me teaching Judo is the lack of standardized vocabulary for ne waza. Students do get frustrated in trying to remember things for testing purposes. It may be an western mind thing that needs to categorize and have names? Or maybe the intuitive/immersion method of learning in Japanese martial arts, at least.

    I started BJJ, and found names for all the sweeps/reversals I'd been doing for years.

    Ben
    I agree to, don't let CK or Hanon know but I actually use some BJJ terminology in my teaching - guard, half guard, guard sweeps etc...

    I had a particularly silly conversation with another JF member where he refused to accept the need to actually give these techniques and situations names.

    As you say students need some additionaly memory tools beyond just watching the technique, especially as I teach mostly late teen and adult beginners they need names much more than kids to anchor techniques and lessons etc...

    It just makes newaza teaching simpler.
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