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  1. Jipi87 is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/09/2010 1:18pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Budo Taijutsu(Bujinkan)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Judo or BJJ

    Hello everyone,

    I've been into martial arts for three straight years now(Into Bujinkan Ninjutsu) and would like to try a new martial art(considering that I'm still into Bujinkan and don't want to stop) and can't settle on which one I should choose: Judo or BJJ.

    I would like to know your opinion on both styles and why I should pick up one and not the other. Just for you to know I appreciate both throws and ground fighting.

    I also want to point out that I'm not interested in going MMA for personnal reasons(career mainly) but I would like to do some competition. Considering my age(22) is it still possible or am I too old? There is a big judo club near where I live and a BJJ dojo also which doesn't crosstrain MMA.

    Some people also told me that Judo is often associated with injuries. Knowing that I'll train also into Bujinkan, I don't want to be always hurt. Is it that bad or is it founded?

    I'm not into getting belts fast or anything like that but I do train really hard and I'm really passionate about martial arts and I would like to know how long does it take to gain a certain level of skills in each one.

    Thanks in advance and sorry for my english if it seems sloppy, I'm french.
    Have a good day.
  2. Kintanon is offline
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    Yes, I am smarter than you are.

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    Posted On:
    8/09/2010 1:50pm

    supporting memberstaff
     Style: TKD, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Well, both Judo and BJJ are trained in a pretty intense manner, so you will get bumps and bruises, the occasional pulled muscle, etc... As long as you pay attention you aren't any more likely to get seriously injured in either one than you are bicycling.

    The two are about equally effective, just with different focuses. So it's most likely going to come down to which art has a good school near you that fits your price range and that you fit well with. I recommend finding the ones in your area and posting them here so you can get some opinions on which are the best. Then visit the 2 or 3 that end up at the top of the recommendation list and see which one best fits your budget, schedule, and attitude.

    Personal Opinion: Drop Bujinkan and do Judo + BJJ. It will make you a better human being.
  3. Jipi87 is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/09/2010 2:08pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Budo Taijutsu(Bujinkan)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    First, thanks for answering.

    1st things, this is what I found for Judo and BJJ(sites are in french though)

    Judo

    http://www.dojobeauport.com/content/view/170/286/

    http://www.judocapitale.com/

    http://www.nouveo.ca/profil.php?idP=67

    BJJ

    http://www.bjjquebec.com/

    There is also a dojo which doesn't have a website so I can really tell about it.

    The subscription fees aren't really a problem since I have a Purse for doing a Master's degree in law.

    Also, I don't care for bruises and bumps, but more about broken limbs.



    As for dropping Bujinkan, I do understand that it does not have many fans here. As any of you, I don't buy any of the Ninja crap Bujinkan often tries to sell to people. I was more interested by the historical approach. My sensei isn't also a typical Bujinkan guy(He does want that we train multiples styles, that we seek new horizons, gain new skills etc.). He also add a strong chinese martial art vibe to his budo taijutsu since he lived in China and Japan for 2 years. He trained bagua and Tai Ji Quan(not sure for the spelling).

    Our dojo is more into Koto and Gyokko ryu than anything else. We don't train much weapons and the like. So even if Bujinkan is normally Uber Crap( I'm often considered black belt when I go to seminars and often better thant most of the black belts under 5th dan. I'm 3ed Kyu and still have many things to learn in my own opinion), My sensei is really different and I consider him more of a martial artist than a bujinkan guy.
  4. gregaquaman is online now
    gregaquaman's Avatar

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    Posted On:
    8/09/2010 2:12pm


     Style: mma /boxing/muai thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    If you do the Booj and Judo or BJJ you might actually become an effective fighting ninja and those dudes are rare.
    So I say go for it
    Last edited by gregaquaman; 8/09/2010 2:22pm at .
  5. Kintanon is offline
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    Yes, I am smarter than you are.

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    Posted On:
    8/09/2010 2:17pm

    supporting memberstaff
     Style: TKD, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Doesn't look like you could go wrong with any of those. Looks like it's going to come down to which school you like better. Go visit them, talk to the instructors, talk to some students, try out a couple of classes and see. The BJJ School is a member of Brazillian Top Team, so they are going to be a solid school for sure. The Judo Capitale school looked great, had some results from recent competitions posted on their website, so you know they compete locally. I think you've got some good options there. Find out which ones fit your schedule best and make your decision based on that and how you get along with the instructors and other students when you meet them.
  6. Jipi87 is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/09/2010 2:18pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Budo Taijutsu(Bujinkan)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Hahaha, thanks for the support. I really appreciate it.

    I found really disturbing that people in Bujinkan are often more close-minded than MMA guys or any other arts. Also, problem in bujinkan is the members who don't follow the true teachings as wanted by Takamatsu-sensei and prefers to become sloppy and lazy martial artists.
  7. Res Judicata is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/09/2010 2:24pm


     Style: Judo & BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You may find Judo an easier transition than BJJ because it's a Japanese art and it probably will have customs and formalities that you're familiar with. Also, depending on where you train, Judo is is 55-75% standup (65 is probably average) which will allow you transition in from your other art. BJJ is anywhere from 5-30% standing and that percentage varies widely. On the other hand it may be an easier transition because it's so different.

    But note: Judo and BJJ are reality therapy. You may get a rude awakening about how much your other art's moves do not work on resisting opponents ...

    22 is a great age; not too old. If you're talented and work hard you could even compete at a reasonably high level. I started Judo in my 30s and it's going just fine.

    That said, train both if you can.
  8. Jipi87 is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/09/2010 2:25pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Budo Taijutsu(Bujinkan)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I look upon the BJJ dojo and problem is, they only offer 1 BJJ class every week(which seems quite low). They train also MMA. Not that I have any problem with MMA guys(I love watchings fights and all), it's just that some of them are major douchebags, not humble any bit, and I just don't fit very well with those kind of people(Not that I'm fat or anything or not in shape, just not on the same way of thinking)
  9. gregaquaman is online now
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    Posted On:
    8/09/2010 2:32pm


     Style: mma /boxing/muai thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Part of going to the gyms and making a decision as what to train will be finding out if you get along with the people you are training with.

    I would give up better instruction so that I was not driven nuts by the people in the class.

    Having said that do not make a judgement on the MMA guys untill you have trained with them the may suprise you.

    On a personal note I was being trained by a BTT guy for a while and he was just a really relaxed cool guy who knew his grappling (Stand up and ground) and with his MMA had a really open mind to other styles
    Last edited by gregaquaman; 8/09/2010 2:36pm at .
  10. wonko221 is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/09/2010 2:39pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I hope you enjoy throwing and grappling, wherever you end up. I have found judo to be immensely satisfying in my own life.

    Responding specifically to your questions about injuries, they are not inherent to either art. While you must be aware that you are putting yourself into a potentially dangerous sport, and even in the safest dojo injuries can and will happen, both arts are designed to be practiced with aliveness while promoting the safety of participants. What i would recommend is visiting each class, and watching the attitudes and behaviors of instructors and advanced students. Also pay attention during your first months at a club to see if they discuss recent injuries, injured students or anything else that indicates that the particular club has a high incident of students who are hurt badly enough that they take time from training.

    If you end up in a school that has either frequent injuries, or the same types of injuries often, you are studying with an instructor who either teaches unsafe technique or fails to correct unsafe practice.

    Beginning students are a less accurate gauge of a school's safety. My teacher has warned me frequently that there is nobody more dangerous on the mat than a white belt. It takes time and serious commitment from both the teacher and student to develop safe technique and practice. Always be extra attentive to new and unknown partners on the mat.

    Lastly, and particularly in judo, learning to fall is imminently important. People are afraid to fall. For all of your life prior to arts that incorporate falling, you have likely developed instincts that you think protect your head and body during a fall. Those instincts are 100% wrong! Take learning to fall seriously; it is a slow process of correcting instinct, and seems silly to many folks. But once you can fall safely, you can play safely and you can learn to enjoy being thrown off your feet and smacked with the planet!
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