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  1. Bugeisha is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/01/2010 6:24am


     Style: Kyokushin

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteShark View Post
    Reaching that far down can be really dangerous. I try to not catch anything below my belly button. Otherwise you have to break cover for too long.
    I was typing this same response, but decided to check and see if anyone else had already posted it. It's like chasing hands. Good way to get KTFO.
  2. ArtOfDefense is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/01/2010 9:46am


     Style: Bayless Freestyle JJ

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    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteShark View Post
    Reaching that far down can be really dangerous. I try to not catch anything below my belly button. Otherwise you have to break cover for too long.

    Good Point. I should clarify I'd only use this technique on guys who potshot with the leg kick. I wouldn't scoop the leg on a guy throwing combos for the most part.
  3. ArtOfDefense is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/01/2010 10:12am


     Style: Bayless Freestyle JJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Bugeisha View Post
    I was typing this same response, but decided to check and see if anyone else had already posted it. It's like chasing hands. Good way to get KTFO.

    No it's not like chasing hands.

    At what point does getting hit become that likely? When you throw back the lead leg and scoop with the rear hand? His rer hand is going to be much too far away to land anyting worthwhile, and his lead hand is going to have no power from having it's corresponding leg in the air, trying to kick you.

    I think you guys are picturing something all together different from what I am attempting to describe.

    If not...well, I pull this in sparring all the time without getting countered. In fact, I will try for this in my fight this month and try to post a vid to prove this works, and works well.
  4. WhiteShark is offline
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    1% Shark is better than you.

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    Posted On:
    7/01/2010 12:31pm

    supporting memberforum leaderstaff
     Style: BJJ/Shidokan

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by ArtOfDefense View Post
    No it's not like chasing hands.

    At what point does getting hit become that likely? When you throw back the lead leg and scoop with the rear hand? His rer hand is going to be much too far away to land anyting worthwhile, and his lead hand is going to have no power from having it's corresponding leg in the air, trying to kick you.

    I think you guys are picturing something all together different from what I am attempting to describe.

    If not...well, I pull this in sparring all the time without getting countered. In fact, I will try for this in my fight this month and try to post a vid to prove this works, and works well.
    No one thinks that a scoop counter doesn't work. It is a matter of where the threshold is for making it effective for YOU. There is definitely a point where you are bending over too much or reaching too much to make catching the kick a "good" idea. This would all depend on stuff like the length of your arms and your speed and your affinity for catching kicks. :ninja7:
  5. ArtOfDefense is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/01/2010 12:33pm


     Style: Bayless Freestyle JJ

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteShark View Post
    No one thinks that a scoop counter doesn't work. It is a matter of where the threshold is for making it effective for YOU. There is definitely a point where you are bending over too much or reaching too much to make catching the kick a "good" idea. This would all depend on stuff like the length of your arms and your speed and your affinity for catching kicks. :ninja7:
    Agreed, no one tool belongs in everyone's toolbox.
  6. Bugeisha is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/03/2010 6:41am


     Style: Kyokushin

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I actually love scooping kicks; my concern was as Whiteshark was saying; it's easy to try to scoop a kick that's too low, which leads to breaking your guard and bending/crouching too much. This might seem more likely to me because I tend to target inside leg kicks just above the knee (at least with the front leg), and that's pretty low to scoop, especially since with that inside leg kick I'm not turned over as far as with an outside kick, so I'm more likely to be in range to exploit it if you lean or something. For a kick to the upper thigh or higher, my favorite counter is the switch and scoop, followed by kicking the back of their kicking leg with the leg I just switched back.
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