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  1. Mtripp is online now
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    Choked out by Gene Lebell

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    Jul 2005
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    Grand Blanc, MI
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    3,277

    Posted On:
    7/02/2010 8:17am

    supporting member
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    For your celebrations this weekend....

    Classic Barbecued Chicken

    Smoky grilled chicken smothered in a thick barbecue sauce is one of America’s favorite summer meals. But despite its popularity, this recipe causes backyard grillers plenty of headaches; one of the most common problems is chicken that is nearly blackened on the outside yet bloody near the bone.

    Test Kitchen Discoveries

    Most recipes call for searing chicken quickly over high heat to render the fat in the skin and finishing on low heat to cook the interior. We had better luck starting the chicken over low heat to slowly render the fat without the danger of flare-ups.

    Using a method called “grill-roasting,” we spread coals on only one side of our grill, added the chicken skin-side down on the other side, and covered the grill. This ensured that we had almost completely cooked chicken before we were ready to add our sauce.

    To create a thick, complex layer of barbecue flavor, we applied our sauce in coats and turned the chicken frequently as it cooked over moderate heat.

    Classic Barbecued Chicken
    Serves 4 to 6

    You can use a mix of chicken breasts, thighs, and drumsticks, making sure they add up to about 10 pieces. Any more than that and you won't be able to line them up on the grill. Although our jazzed-up barbecue sauce is best, this recipe also works with plain store-bought sauce; our favorite brand is Bull's-Eye.


    Quick BBQ Sauce
    3 cups barbecue sauce (bottled)
    1/2 cup molasses
    1/2 cup ketchup
    1/4 cup cider vinegar
    3 tablespoons brown mustard
    2 teaspoons onion powder
    1 teaspoon garlic powder

    Chicken
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon pepper
    1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
    3 pounds bone-in, skin-on chicken pieces (breasts, whole legs, thighs, and/or drumsticks), trimmed and breasts halved

    1. For the sauce: Whisk all ingredients in medium saucepan and bring to boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium and cook until sauce is thick and reduced to 3 cups, about 20 minutes. (Sauce can be refrigerated in airtight container for up to 1 week.)

    2. For the chicken: Mix salt, pepper, and cayenne in small bowl. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and rub spice mixture all over chicken pieces.

    3. Open bottom vent on grill. Light large chimney starter filled with charcoal briquettes (about 100 coals) and burn until charcoal is covered with fine gray ash. Place 13 by 9-inch disposable aluminum roasting pan on one side of grill and pour coals in even layer over other side of grill. Set cooking grate in place, cover, open lid vents completely, and let grill heat for 5 minutes. Scrape cooking grate clean.

    4. Oil grate and place chicken skin side down on cooler side of grill. Cover, with half-opened lid vents over chicken, and cook until chicken begins to brown, 30 to 35 minutes. Move chicken into single line close to coals. Begin flipping chicken and brushing with 2 cups sauce every 5 minutes until sticky, about 20 minutes. Slide chicken pieces over coals and continue to brush chicken until sauce on chicken becomes crusted and internal temperature of breast meat registers 165 degrees and legs, thighs, and drumsticks register 175 degrees, about 5 minutes. Transfer chicken to platter, tent with foil, and let rest 10 minutes. Remove foil and serve, passing remaining sauce at table.
    "Out of every hundred men, ten shouldn't even be there, eighty are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior, and he will bring the others back." -- Hericletus, circa 500 BC
  2. Mtripp is online now
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    Choked out by Gene Lebell

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    Posted On:
    7/02/2010 8:20am

    supporting member
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Cool and Creamy Macaroni Salad
    A staple side dish at many barbecues, macaroni salad wraps pasta elbows and chopped celery and onion in a creamy dressing. Or it should—most macaroni salads are pretty dry and bland because as it sits, the pasta soaks up the dressing. We wanted a creamy macaroni salad that stayed that way. Here’s what we discovered:

    Test Kitchen Discoveries

    Cook the pasta until just tender—not all the way—and leave a little moisture on it. The pasta will absorb the water rather than the creamy dressing.

    Add a fair amount of lemon juice to the salad to balance the richness of the mayonnaise.

    This is one of the rare occasions in which we prefer garlic powder to fresh garlic because the flavor isn’t as sharp and the powder dissolves into the smooth dressing.
    Make sure to thoroughly season the water in which the pasta is cooked; otherwise the pasta’s flavor will be bland. We recommend 1 tablespoon of salt per gallon of water.

    Cool and Creamy Macaroni Salad
    Serves 8 to 10

    Don’t drain the macaroni too well before adding the other ingredients--a little extra moisture will keep the salad from drying out. If you’ve made the salad ahead of time, simply stir in a little warm water to loosen the texture.

    Table salt
    1 pound elbow macaroni
    1/2 small red onion , minced
    1 rib celery , minced
    1/4 cup minced fresh parsley leaves
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
    1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
    Pinch cayenne pepper
    1 1/2 cups mayonnaise
    Ground black pepper

    1. Bring 4 quarts water to boil in large pot. Add 1 tablespoon salt and macaroni and cook until nearly tender, about 5 minutes. Drain in colander and rinse with cold water until cool, then drain briefly so that macaroni remains moist. Transfer to large bowl.

    2. Stir in onion, celery, parsley, lemon juice, mustard, garlic powder, and cayenne, and let sit until flavors are absorbed, about 2 minutes. Add mayonnaise and let sit until salad texture is no longer watery, 5 to 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve. (The salad can be covered and refrigerated for up to 2 days. Check consistency and seasonings before serving.)
    "Out of every hundred men, ten shouldn't even be there, eighty are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior, and he will bring the others back." -- Hericletus, circa 500 BC
  3. Mtripp is online now
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    Choked out by Gene Lebell

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    Posted On:
    7/02/2010 8:23am

    supporting member
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Dilly Garden Potato Salad

    The French make a vinaigrette-flavored potato salad far lighter than its creamy American counterpart. The addition of green beans and lots of herbs keeps the salad bright and fresh tasting. The problem is, when we tried a couple of recipes, the vinaigrette pooled at the bottom of the bowl and the potatoes were mushy. The dismal results spurred us on to try and master a French-style potato salad. Here’s what we discovered:

    Test Kitchen Discoveries

    Dress the potatoes and green beans while they are still hot so that they absorb the vinaigrette.

    Liberally season the water in which the green beans and potatoes are cooked; otherwise they will taste bland.

    Make the dressing extra sharp to compensate for the starchiness of the potatoes. An extra kick of mustard and shallots reinforces the vinegar’s flavor.

    Reserve the herbs and a little of the vinaigrette to add just before serving for the freshest flavor.

    Dilly Garden Potato Salad
    Serves 6

    The key to infusing this summer-fresh salad with flavor is dressing the green beans and potatoes while they are hot. The salad can be made up to 1 day in advance. Just bring the salad back up to room temperature and add the fresh herbs and reserved dressing before serving. The familiar combination of lemon and fresh dill makes this potato salad a natural side for grilled fish. Salmon is an especially good choice.

    1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    3 tablespoons lemon juice
    1 1/2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
    1 small shallot , minced
    1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
    8 ounces green beans , ends trimmed and cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces
    2 tablespoons table salt
    2 pounds red potatoes , scrubbed and cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces
    1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley leaves
    2 tablespoons chopped chives
    2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill leaves

    1. Whisk oil, lemon juice, mustard, shallot, and pepper together in large bowl. Reserve 1/4 cup dressing in measuring cup.

    2. Bring 6 cups water to boil in large saucepan. Add green beans and salt. Cook, uncovered, until green beans are slightly tender but still crisp, about 4 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer beans to plate lined with paper towels to drain briefly, then add to bowl with dressing. Toss to coat.

    3. Add potatoes to still simmering water. Bring back to boil and cook until paring knife can be inserted into potatoes with no resistance, 7 to 10 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer potatoes to colander and drain briefly. Add hot potatoes to bowl with beans and dressing. Toss gently to combine and let sit at least 10 minutes.

    4. Add parsley, chives, dill, and reserved dressing to bowl. Toss gently to combine and serve.

    NOTE:

    Though mayonnaise is often blamed for spoiled potato salads it is rarely the problem. In fact, the potatoes that are more likely to go bad. The bacteria usually responsible for spoiled potato salad are found in soil and dust, and they thrive on starchy foods like potatoes. No matter what kind of dressing you use, don't leave any potato salad out for more than two hours (one hour if the temperature is above 90 degrees), and promptly refrigerate any leftovers in a covered container.
    "Out of every hundred men, ten shouldn't even be there, eighty are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior, and he will bring the others back." -- Hericletus, circa 500 BC
  4. Mtripp is online now
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    Choked out by Gene Lebell

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    Grand Blanc, MI
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    Posted On:
    7/02/2010 8:26am

    supporting member
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I prefer this classic one:

    All-American Potato Salad

    A backyard barbecue wouldn’t be complete without a big bowl of potato salad. Chances are, however, that salad isn’t what it could be. The potatoes might be mushy or the vinaigrette bland. How do you make perfect American-style potato salad? Here’s what we discovered:

    Test Kitchen Discoveries

    Use firm-textured, full-flavored Yukon Gold potatoes. They hold their shape after cooking and won’t turn mushy in the salad. Do take the time to peel them first; their skin can be tough and papery.

    Use pickle juice in the vinaigrette. Because it is less acidic and sweeter-tasting than vinegar, we found that it could be used to great effect.

    Drizzle the still-warm potatoes with a mixture of pickle juice and mustard. The hot potatoes will easily absorb the acidic liquid and taste seasoned through to the middle.

    All-American Potato Salad
    Serves 4 to 6

    Make sure not to overcook the potatoes or the salad will be quite sloppy. Keep the water at a gentle simmer and use the tip of a paring knife to judge the doneness of the potatoes. If the knife inserts easily into the potato pieces, they are done.

    2 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes , peeled and cut into 3/4-inch cubes
    1 1/2 teaspoons table salt
    3 tablespoons dill pickle juice , plus 1/4 cup finely chopped dill pickles
    1 tablespoon yellow mustard
    1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
    1/2 teaspoon celery seed
    1/2 cup mayonnaise
    1/4 cup sour cream
    1/2 onion, red (small) , chopped fine
    1 rib celery , chopped fine
    2 hard-cooked eggs , peeled and cut into 1/4-inch dice (optional)

    1. Place potatoes in large saucepan with cold water to cover by 1 inch. Bring to boil over high heat, add 1 teaspoon salt, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer until potatoes are tender, 10 to 15 minutes.

    2. Drain potatoes thoroughly, then spread out on rimmed baking sheet. Mix 2 tablespoons pickle juice and mustard together in small bowl, drizzle pickle juice mixture over potatoes, and toss until evenly coated. Refrigerate until cooled, about 30 minutes.

    3. Mix remaining tablespoon pickle juice, chopped pickles, remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt, pepper, celery seed, mayonnaise, sour cream, red onion, and celery in large bowl. Toss in cooled potatoes, cover, and refrigerate until well chilled, about 30 minutes. (Salad can be refrigerated in airtight container for up to 2 days.) Gently stir in eggs, if using, just before serving.
    "Out of every hundred men, ten shouldn't even be there, eighty are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior, and he will bring the others back." -- Hericletus, circa 500 BC
  5. Mtripp is online now
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    Choked out by Gene Lebell

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    Posted On:
    7/02/2010 8:28am

    supporting member
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Patriotic Poke Cake

    So many Fourth of July cakes slap some colored icing on a cake and call it a day. We wanted our entire cake to scream red, white, and blue all the way through. Here’s what we discovered:

    Test Kitchen Discoveries

    We cooked blueberries and strawberries to create two separate syrups to drizzle over our white cake.

    Poking holes into the top of the cake allowed us to incorporate our syrups directly into the interior of the cake.

    Patriotic Poke Cake
    Serves 12

    Flavored gelatin and fresh berries give white cake layers stripes of red ruby and berry blue. We swathe the cake in whipped cream for a festive July 4 treat.

    1 cup blueberries
    1 1/4 cups water
    1/4 cup sugar
    2 tablespoons berry-flavored gelatin
    1 1/2 cups strawberries , hulled
    1 tablespoon strawberry-flavored gelatin
    2 8-inch baked white cake rounds , cooled completely and still in pans (see related recipe)
    4 cups lightly sweetened whipped cream

    For the blueberry and strawberry syrups: Cook blueberries, 3/4 cup water, and 2 tablespoons sugar in medium saucepan over medium-low heat, covered, until blueberries are softened, about 8 minutes. Strain through fine-mesh strainer into medium bowl; discard solids. Whisk berry-flavored gelatin into juices and cool slightly, about 15 minutes. Repeat cooking and straining using strawberries, remaining water, and remaining sugar. Whisk strawberry-flavored gelatin into juices and cool slightly, about 15 minutes.

    To assemble: Using skewer, poke 25 holes in top of each cake, twisting gently to form slightly larger holes. Pour cooled blueberry syrup over 1 cake layer. Repeat with cooled strawberry syrup and second layer cake. Cover cakes with plastic wrap and refrigerate until gelatin is set, at least 3 or up to 24 hours. Run knife along interior of pans. Invert blueberry cake onto wire rack, then flip cake right side up onto serving platter. Spread 1 cup whipped cream over top. Invert strawberry cake and place, right side up, on whipped cream. Spread remaining whipped cream over top and sides of cake. Slice and serve.
    "Out of every hundred men, ten shouldn't even be there, eighty are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior, and he will bring the others back." -- Hericletus, circa 500 BC
  6. Mtripp is online now
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    Choked out by Gene Lebell

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    Posted On:
    7/02/2010 8:30am

    supporting member
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Lexington-Style Pulled Pork For Charcoal Grill

    The traditional approach to Lexington-style barbecue--succulent pork shoulder combined with a thin and pungent vinegar-based sauce--can be intimidating, requiring hours and hours of grilling. Could we simplify this classic recipe without sacrificing flavor? Here's what we discovered.

    Test Kitchen Discoveries

    A combination of grilling and oven-roasting reduces the cooking time from all day (as is common in traditional recipes) to just four or five hours.

    Doubling the amount of wood chips gives the pork enough smoky flavor to compensate for the shorter grilling time.

    Relying on the fork test, not time, to determine doneness is key: Just stick a fork straight into the top of the roast and lift. If the fork comes out with little or no resistance, the meat is fork-tender (just right).

    Cider vinegar is the best choice for the sauce, especially when paired with ketchup, a little sugar, black pepper, and hot red pepper flakes.


    Lexington-Style Pulled Pork For Charcoal Grill
    Serves 8 to 10

    Pork butt (often labeled Boston butt) is usually sold boneless and wrapped in netting but is sometimes available on the bone. If barbecuing a bone-in roast, or if your pork butt weighs more than 5 pounds, plan on an extra 30 to 60 minutes of oven cooking time.


    Spice Rub and Pork
    2 tablespoons paprika
    2 tablespoons ground black pepper
    2 tablespoons brown sugar
    1 tablespoon table salt
    1 boneless pork shoulder roast (4- to 5-pound)
    4 cups wood chips

    Lexington BBQ Sauce
    1 cup water
    1 cup cider vinegar
    1/2 cup ketchup
    1 tablespoon sugar
    3/4 teaspoon table salt
    1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
    1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes

    1. For the spice rub and pork: Combine spices, sugar, and salt in small bowl, breaking up any lumps as necessary. Massage entire pork roast with spice mixture. (Roast may be wrapped tightly and refrigerated for up to 1 day.)

    2. Soak wood chips in bowl of water to cover for 15 minutes. Open bottom grill vents. Light large chimney starter filled halfway with charcoal briquettes (about 50 coals) and burn until charcoal is covered with fine gray ash. Pour coals into pile on one side of grill and scatter wood chips over coals. Set cooking grate in place, cover, and let grill heat up 5 minutes. Scrape grate clean.

    3. Position pork on cooler side of grill. Cover, positioning half-open lid vents directly over meat, and cook until meat has dark, rosy crust and charcoal is spent, about 2 hours.

    4. Meanwhile, adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and heat oven to 325 degrees. Transfer pork to large roasting pan, wrap pan and pork tightly in foil, and roast in oven until fork inserted into pork can be removed with no resistance (see related Tip), 2 to 3 hours. Remove from oven and rest, still wrapped in foil, for 30 minutes.

    5. For the sauce: Whisk together all ingredients until sugar and salt are dissolved. Using hands, pull pork into thin shreds, discarding fat if desired. Toss pork with 1/2 cup vinegar sauce, serving remaining sauce at table.
    "Out of every hundred men, ten shouldn't even be there, eighty are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior, and he will bring the others back." -- Hericletus, circa 500 BC
  7. Hesperus is offline
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    it's all vanity

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    Posted On:
    7/02/2010 8:32am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kano-Gracie

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Pasta salads are wrong and unnatural.
  8. Mtripp is online now
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    Choked out by Gene Lebell

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    Posted On:
    7/02/2010 8:32am

    supporting member
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Lexington-Style Pulled Pork For Gas Grill

    The traditional approach to Lexington-style barbecue--succulent pork shoulder combined with a thin and pungent vinegar-based sauce--can be intimidating, requiring hours and hours of grilling. Could we simplify this classic recipe without sacrificing flavor? Here's what we discovered.

    Test Kitchen Discoveries

    A combination of grilling and oven-roasting reduces the cooking time from all day (as is common in traditional recipes) to just four or five hours.

    Doubling the amount of wood chips gives the pork enough smoky flavor to compensate for the shorter grilling time.

    Relying on the fork test, not time, to determine doneness is key: Just stick a fork straight into the top of the roast and lift. If the fork comes out with little or no resistance, the meat is fork-tender (just right).

    Cider vinegar is the best choice for the sauce, especially when paired with ketchup, a little sugar, black pepper, and hot red pepper flakes.


    Lexington-Style Pulled Pork For Gas Grill
    Serves 8 to 10

    Pork butt (often labeled Boston butt) is usually sold boneless and wrapped in netting but is sometimes available on the bone. If barbecuing a bone-in roast, or if your pork butt weighs more than 5 pounds, plan on an extra 30 to 60 minutes of oven cooking time.


    Spice Rub and Pork
    2 tablespoons paprika
    2 tablespoons ground black pepper
    2 tablespoons brown sugar
    1 tablespoon table salt
    1 boneless pork shoulder roast (4- to 5-pound)
    4 cups wood chips

    Lexington BBQ Sauce
    1 cup water
    1 cup cider vinegar
    1/2 cup ketchup
    1 tablespoon sugar
    3/4 teaspoon table salt
    1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
    1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes

    1. For the spice rub and pork: Combine spices, sugar, and salt in small bowl, breaking up any lumps as necessary. Massage entire pork roast with spice mixture. (Roast may be wrapped tightly and refrigerated for up to 1 day.)

    2. Soak wood chips in bowl of water to cover for 15 minutes; seal in foil packet (see related Tip). Place packet on primary burner of gas grill, turn all burners to high, and preheat with lid down until chips are smoking heavily, about 15 minutes. Turn primary burner to medium and shut off other burners, adjusting temperature of primary burner as needed to maintain average temperature of 275 degrees.

    3. Position pork over cool part of grill. Cover and cook until meat has dark, rosy crust and charcoal is spent, about 2 hours.

    4. Meanwhile, adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and heat oven to 325 degrees. Transfer pork to large roasting pan, wrap pan and pork tightly in foil, and roast in oven until fork inserted into pork can be removed with no resistance, 2 to 3 hours. Remove from oven and rest, still wrapped in foil, for 30 minutes.

    5. For the sauce: Whisk together all ingredients until sugar and salt are dissolved. Using hands, pull pork into thin shreds, discarding fat if desired. Toss pork with 1/2 cup vinegar sauce, serving remaining sauce at table.
    "Out of every hundred men, ten shouldn't even be there, eighty are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior, and he will bring the others back." -- Hericletus, circa 500 BC
  9. Coach Josh is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/02/2010 8:49am

    Business Class Supporting Member
     Gladiators Academy Lafayette, LA Style: Judo, MMA, White Trash JJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Over thinking BBQ you are not using maximum efficiency with minimal effort.

    Drunk Chicken

    1. Take a whole chicken out of the wrapper.
    2. Open a can of beer drink half of it.
    3. Shove beer can up chicken's ass
    4. Coat chicken with honey
    5. Shake cinnamon sugar salt black pepper cayenne pepper on it
    6. Put on pit and drink the rest of the 6 pack at a reasonable rate, done.

    Side dishes

    Tell the rest of the slackers coming over to bring side dishes
    Judo is only gentle for the guy on top.
  10. Mtripp is online now
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    Choked out by Gene Lebell

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    Posted On:
    7/02/2010 8:52am

    supporting member
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    If you insist....

    BBQ Beer-Can Chicken on a Charcoal Grill

    A classic of the barbecue circuit, barbecued beer-can chicken involves resting a whole chicken upright on a can of beer and grill-roasting it. The odd technique accomplishes two things at once: As the beer turns to steam, it flavors the interior of the chicken and keeps it moist. The smoke bathes the exterior and turns the skin crisp. Or at least that’s the idea; we have tasted too many bland, greasy beer-can chickens with not a whole lot of beer flavor. We wanted crisp-skinned, moist, beer- and smoke-flavored chicken. Here’s what we discovered:

    Test Kitchen Discoveries

    Bank the coals in the grill on either side of a disposable aluminum pan. The coals will cook the chicken evenly and the pan will catch dripping fat from the chicken.

    Open the top of the can wide open with a church key to allow the greatest amount of steam to escape. The normal hole is far too small.

    Lance the chicken’s skin with a skewer to make holes from which rendering fat can escape.

    Rub the chicken liberally with a spice rub on top of and underneath the skin.

    Coat the chicken with a sweet-tart glaze towards the end of cooking to improve the chicken’s flavor and color. If applied too early, the glaze will burn.

    STEP BY STEP

    Flavor That's More Than Skin Deep

    From its crisp, spiced skin to moist meat, beer-can chicken is flavored through and through. Here's how to get the ultimate beer-can chicken experience from your grill.

    1. Use a church key can opener to punch holes in the top of the can; this will allow the maximum amount of steam to escape.

    2. Loosen the skin on the breasts and thighs of the chicken by sliding your fingers between the skin and the meat.

    3. Massage the spice mixture on the skin, under the skin, and inside the cavity.

    4. Using a skewer, poke the skin all over to render as much fat as possible.


    BBQ Beer-Can Chicken on a Charcoal Grill
    Makes 2 chickens, serving 4 to 6

    Look for chickens that weigh between 3 and 3 1/2 pounds; if they are significantly larger, you may have trouble fitting the lid on the grill.


    Spice Rub
    2 tablespoons packed light brown sugar
    2 tablespoons paprika
    1 tablespoon table salt
    1 tablespoon ground black pepper
    1 teaspoon cayenne pepper

    Glaze
    2 tablespoons packed light brown sugar
    2 tablespoons ketchup
    2 tablespoons white vinegar
    2 tablespoons beer
    1 teaspoon hot sauce

    Beer and Chicken
    2 (12-ounce) cans beer
    4 crumbled bay leaves
    2 whole chickens (3 to 3 1/2 pounds each), patted dry
    4 cups wood chips

    1. For the spice rub: Mix brown sugar, paprika, salt, black pepper, and cayenne in bowl.

    2. For the glaze: Stir brown sugar, ketchup, vinegar, beer, and hot sauce together in medium bowl. Add 1 tablespoon spice rub.

    3. For the rest: Measure out 1 cup beer from each can; take 2 tablespoons from measured beer and add to ketchup glaze. Prepare beer cans as shown in photo 1, and add 2 crumbled bay leaves to each can.

    4. Prepare chickens as shown in photos 2 through 4.

    5. Soak wood chips in bowl of water to cover for 15 minutes. Light large chimney starter filled with charcoal briquettes (about 90 coals) and burn until charcoal is covered with fine gray ash. Place 13 by 9-inch disposable aluminum roasting pan in center of grill. Pour half of coals into pile on each side of grill, leaving pan in center. Scatter wood chips evenly over coals, set cooking grate in place, cover, and let grill heat up 5 minutes.

    6. Place chickens (on cans) on center of grate, using drumsticks to stabilize them. Cover and grill until skin is well browned and very crisp, 40 to 60 minutes. Brush with ketchup glaze and grill, covered, until thigh meat registers 170 degrees on instant-read thermometer, about 20 minutes longer. Wearing oven mitts or using wad of paper towels, transfer chickens (still on cans) from grill to cutting board and let rest for 10 minutes. Hold base of can with oven mitt or wad of paper towels, insert tongs into neck cavity of chicken, and pull chicken off can. Carve and serve.
    "Out of every hundred men, ten shouldn't even be there, eighty are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior, and he will bring the others back." -- Hericletus, circa 500 BC
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