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  1. #1

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    To learn BJJ with Gi or No Gi

    I'm contemplating to train in BJJ at a traditional gym that uses the gi or at a gym that offers mostly no gi classes and the gym is more MMA orientated. which should I choose if I want to compete in MMA one day
    Last edited by SolanoHRT; 6/30/2010 4:06pm at .

  2. #2
    AKRhino's Avatar
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    Well, I usually say why not do both? The gi will make your jits better IMHO. If you want to compete in MMA, you should probably go to the MMA gym, assuming it has at least equally good instruction. Check/try out both places, and decide which one is a better fit for you.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKRhino View Post
    Well, I usually say why not do both? The gi will make your jits better IMHO. If you want to compete in MMA, you should probably go to the MMA gym, assuming it has at least equally good instruction. Check/try out both places, and decide which one is a better fit for you.
    *Smacks Rhino

    Wrong answer bitch.

    Gi and No gi are two completely different games. Doing both will make you an great practitioner. The gi will force a person to develop a good defense as friction prevents easy escapes from happening. Unfortunately it makes for a sloppy offense which is easy to compensate with a gi. The no gi for the exact opposite reasoning, is good for developing a good offense because it forces you to compensate the lack of friction and grip but your defense will suffer as you will find it easier to get out of holds you normally wouldn't be able to if you were using a gi.

    If you were to choose a start off point I would say do the gi first because it'll give you a better understanding of the game and switch to no gi when you reach mid blue belt rank unless you want to start MMA early.

    (See how it's done? *Face palm):redx:

  4. #4
    AKRhino's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Omega the Merciless View Post
    *Smacks Rhino

    Wrong answer bitch.

    Gi and No gi are two completely different games. Doing both will make you an great practitioner. The gi will force a person to develop a good defense as friction prevents easy escapes from happening. Unfortunately it makes for a sloppy offense which is easy to compensate with a gi. The no gi for the exact opposite reasoning, is good for developing a good offense because it forces you to compensate the lack of friction and grip but your defense will suffer as you will find it easier to get out of holds you normally wouldn't be able to if you were using a gi.

    If you were to choose a start off point I would say do the gi first because it'll give you a better understanding of the game and switch to no gi when you reach mid blue belt rank unless you want to start MMA early.

    (See how it's done? *Face palm):redx:
    Holy ****, Omega spoke to me.....!!!!!

    *butt scoots away*

  5. #5

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    I suggest you listen to Omega on this one. I won’t offer advice (apart from “listen to what Omega already said”, there’s no need), but as a personal observation of what the one game has brought to the other for me:

    You can grip and stall far more easily with the gi than without it; no-gi, in my experience, is a much faster and more dynamic game, not because you can’t be fast and dynamic with the gi, but because in no-gi you have to be. Many of the same moves work in both games, but can be done slowly in the gi because you have solid grips, whereas in no-gi they cannot work unless done explosively. (Which is how you should do them even with the gi, anyway!)

    As such, and as I tend to be too passive and defensive, adding regular no-gi practice has vastly improved my gi game as I have been forced out of my slow and lazy habits.
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  6. #6
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    To restate what Omega already said in other words as they were described to me by someone else:

    The gi game is much less forgiving.

    The grips and friction force you to focus on technique (instead of raw power) and try to understand why something works and more importantly why it doesn't (don't forget to tap in this case). They also slow down the action a bit to give you a moment to think.

    Another vote for starting with the gi.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SolanoHRT View Post
    I'm contemplating to train in BJJ at a traditional gym that uses the gi or at a gym that offers mostly no gi classes and the gym is more MMA orientated. which should I choose if I want to compete in MMA one day

    Depends, do you often get into fights during slumber parties?

    No?

    MAybe don't wear the PJ's.

    (I think I'm gonna get flamed for that bit, but I stand by it. Train how you fight.)

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by ArtOfDefense View Post
    Depends, do you often get into fights during slumber parties?

    No?

    MAybe don't wear the PJ's.

    (I think I'm gonna get flamed for that bit, but I stand by it. Train how you fight.)
    Of course you should train the way you fight; it does not logically follow that you should not train in a way you don’t fight (that’s akin to a logical inverse error). I’m sure you’ll agree with me, because I’m sure you often do train in ways that are unlike the way you fight, e.g. during static drills, compliant or semi-compliant (partial resistance) drills, padwork, and so on and so forth. (We probably all agree that you absolutely shouldn’t always train like you fight: Rather less than 100% of your training time should be full contact sparring!)

    We can dismiss a training regimen that excludes training-like-you-fight, but when it comes to dismissing individual parts of a regimen that includes training-how-you-fight, the relevant question is, does this training method impart anything valuable to the end product?

    Omega and Uncle Skippy, who are both better grapplers than I am (and probably better than you), argue that gi training does offer benefits in forcing you to be more technical in certain areas. I have nothing to add to that, except to point out as above that this does not contradict the generally agreed-upon opinion that you should train the way you fight.
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  9. #9
    Uncle Skippy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArtOfDefense View Post
    Depends, do you often get into fights during slumber parties?

    No?

    MAybe don't wear the PJ's.

    (I think I'm gonna get flamed for that bit, but I stand by it. Train how you fight.)
    The gi instills better habits earlier in the training process. Omega's post is a great explanation to that end.

    With a gi, you introduce grips (for example) which make it easier to break down somebody's posture and disrupt their base. For a new person, that added advantage helps them in drilling day to day. They can pull off more 'stuff' and figure out the mechanics because of those grips. More successful reps = a better feel for the game.

  10. #10
    Fasten your seat belts, and prepare for lift off
    DKJr's Avatar
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    I'd also say since the grips in gi allow open guard to be used more this allows for the opportunity for better hip movement to be developed. (<-That sentence didn't sound right)

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