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  1. #11
    tgace's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Im no anatomy expert, but isn't a KO basically caused by the head rotating suddenly, causing the brain to slosh around inside the skull and....

    YouTube- The Anatomy Of The One Punch Knockout

    so while getting hit on the jaw causes the skull to rotate/move I don't know if the Jaw itself really enters much into the equation. I'm guessing that the only options you have are to train evasive head movement, how to roll with a punch, keep your chin down at all times and strengthen the neck.

  2. #12
    WhiteShark's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The thing is all the spots that are famous for causing knockouts are the best spots to create torque on your head and get the ole brain sloshing effect.

  3. #13
    hungryjoe's Avatar
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    White Shark gives sound advice. Learn to roll with the punches. It'll help the brain from getting torqued in the brain housing.

    Question MMC. Are you a mouth breather? Fighting with the mouth open is an invitation to a KO.

  4. #14
    Southpaw's Avatar
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    I was going to say something to the effect of 'if you want to learn how to take a punch you have to go get punched a lot'. In my experience the more I fight the more I learn how to minimize blows.

    In any case this was much more articulate:

    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteShark View Post
    One thing I'd add is that "Rolling with the punches" is not just a folksy saying. You need to learn to literally roll away from shots that you can't block or dodge. This is one thing that happened from training bare knuckle Kyokushin style sparring. Yeah it isn't the head but you learn pretty fast to twist away from shots to take the power out of them once you understand the timing you can start doing it in you kick boxing sparring too.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by tgace View Post
    Im no anatomy expert, but isn't a KO basically caused by the head rotating suddenly, causing the brain to slosh around inside the skull and....
    Only somewhat actually. The temple and the chin both also hit nerves that cause your brain to shutdown immediately. Basically, a "taking damage, fall down play dead and reboot" reflex we have.

    Most blows to the head, though, reply on the head torque you talked about.

  6. #16
    tgace's Avatar
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    A Glass Jaw can often be about Heart.

    If the origins of a good chin are tough to isolate, the anatomy of a knockout can be explained in scientific terms. When a fighter is clipped on the tip of the chin, his head swivels with such force, his brain vibrates inside his skull. That movement stretches nerve tissues in the brain, which then causes a concussion, said Barry Jordan, a longtime ringside doctor with the New York State Athletic Commission.

    After conducting medical tests and neurological exams on dozens of boxers, Jordan said fighters who tend to have rugged chins are sometimes those with thicker skulls and necks. Better defensive skills, quicker reflexes and good genes can also be factors, Jordan said.

    ''A good chin has more to do with genes -- a fighter's genetic predisposition to tolerate punishment,'' he said.

  7. #17

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    So while in medical school I have actually asked several doctors about this, and apparently the button on the chin isn't just about a concussion from torque to the head. It is also about compressing the sub-mandibular nerve, which is a separate, independent signal to shutdown the brain temporarily.

  8. #18
    WhiteShark's Avatar
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    SifuJason isn't that just on the front though? I thought the jaw "spots" on the side were just ideal levers for torquing the brain.
    Last edited by WhiteShark; 6/11/2010 11:57pm at .

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteShark View Post
    SifuJason isn't that just on the front though? I thought the jaw "spots" on the side were just ideal levers for torquing the brain.
    Yes, pretty much. The nerve can get hit a bit on the side of the jaw, but "the button" is the only spot where the nerve is really whacked. That and the temples, which hits a nerve as it emerges from the brain and also can affect blood flow to the brain.

    The rest of the jaw is just an ideal lever, as you pointed out.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by SifuJason View Post
    Yes, pretty much. The nerve can get hit a bit on the side of the jaw, but "the button" is the only spot where the nerve is really whacked. That and the temples, which hits a nerve as it emerges from the brain and also can affect blood flow to the brain.

    The rest of the jaw is just an ideal lever, as you pointed out.
    Franklin just demonstrated "the button" beautifully on Lidell's jaw.

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