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  1. #31

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    After my very first Muay Thai lesson today I'll add the basic Muay Thai kick to my list. That sucker looks powerful and painful when done right. It kind of looks like a slightly modified roundhouse kick thrown at the legs and body.

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by DerAuslander108 View Post
    Spinning back kick.

    I don't care how viby your nitpick is.

    "Back kick" by itself is an idiot's attempt to draw distinctions between side kicks done right and side kicks done suck.
    Grrr......CURSE YOU!!

    A bit more serious I was taught that back kick is different then a spinning kick in that your body merely turns, making you drive the kick straight (ergo linear).

    And side kick done suck..? How exactly does that look?

  3. #33
    Vorpal's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Some of your favorite tkd kicks in action:
    YouTube- TaeKwonDo Knockouts

  4. #34

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Jumping Back, hands down.

  5. #35
    maofas's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    My tornado kick is slowly coming along! Before long someone shall feel its wrath at a TD!

  6. #36

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    I'd have to say the inward crescent kick and roundhouse are my favorites. Although I'm also partial to side kicks.

  7. #37
    maofas's Avatar
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    What striking surface are people using to land with crescent?

    And in the situations you'd throw a crescent, why would you throw it instead of a round kick that hits harder and also comes from the side?

    I'm curious because I've never seen a point to the kick beyond kicking rubber knives out of people's hands during demos. If anything the motion works better if you keep it chambered and don't kick, using it as a leg block vs. front kicks as you close.
    Last edited by maofas; 6/07/2010 10:11pm at .

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by maofas View Post
    What striking surface are people using to land with crescent?

    And in the situations you'd throw a crescent, why would you throw it instead of a round kick that hits harder and also comes from the side?

    I'm curious because I've never seen a point to the kick beyond kicking rubber knives out of people's hands during demos. If anything the motion works better if you keep it chambered and don't kick, using it as a leg block vs. front kicks as you close.
    For the most part I use the inner edge of the foot. I typically use it when I am playing around. Other than that I'd say you're right about there being better kicks to use in that range.

  9. #39
    Rene "Zendokan" Gysenbergs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maofas View Post
    What striking surface are people using to land with crescent?

    And in the situations you'd throw a crescent, why would you throw it instead of a round kick that hits harder and also comes from the side?

    I'm curious because I've never seen a point to the kick beyond kicking rubber knives out of people's hands during demos. If anything the motion works better if you keep it chambered and don't kick, using it as a leg block vs. front kicks as you close.
    Crescent kick surface is first contact with the side of the foot, than prolonging the contact with the sole of the foot.

    You use it to in two methods, both are set-ups for a finishing technique:
    - hit the face of your opponent with side and sole and you have got a nice window of oppertunity to follow up with other techniques

    - use it to push aside the gloves, so that the face becomes vulnerable for a roundhouse kick. (left leg kicks the crescent kick to the gloves, pushing them sideways, followed with a right leg roundhouse kick to the head).

    my personal experience using them in Taekwondo, Savate en Muay Thai.

    An outside to inside crescent kick (impact would the innerside of the foot) can be used as axe kick/push kick mix to get some breeding distance.
    Last edited by Rene "Zendokan" Gysenbergs; 6/08/2010 5:53am at .
    Quote Originally Posted by Jiujitsu77
    You know you are crazy about BJJ/Martial arts when...
    Quote Originally Posted by Humanzee
    ...your books on Kama Sutra and BJJ are interchangeable.
    Quote Originally Posted by jk55299 on Keysi Fighting Method
    It looks like this is a great fighting method if someone replaces your shampoo with superglue.
    The real deadly:

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by SadakoMoose View Post
    540 or Jumping Back anything, really.
    I love the rush that those kicks give me, spinning very fast.
    Yeah, it's not the most practical art, but I love it for what it is.

    The point of those kicks doesnt matter if it is practical..it's to challenge your body and your self to do something that most people cannot do.

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