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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Los Angeles
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    5
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    So far noone seems to have any experience with AT. I'd really like to hear from someone who has tried it.

    I am trying AT just like I am trying a couple of different martial arts. My goals are to be more in control of my body, keep it in good shape etc. And yes learning some ass-kicking is fun but I don't think I'm going to shoot for an MMA career any time soon!

    madeofcandy: I think your question is, Isn't it backwards to learn martial arts by learning AT?: I don't know. I'm a newbie at both, may be AT doesn't apply to MA. AT doensn't teach punches and chokes. The reason I considered it a possibility is because AT seems to focus on training your mind to be more aware of the state of your body. It claims to work your kinesthetic senses: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinesthesia I haven't seen results myself yet but I'm just getting started. It might be good mental conditioning training.

    darklight: It has been part of Theater curriculum for a while now and it's taught to actors.... yes some of the actors are metro, pretty ladies, and yes it does have a bit of yoga element to it... but there is definitely less mystique involved. It seems to be more methodical/analytical. Apparently now AT classes are getting more and more dominated by people who want to work on repetative stress injuries.

    Lebell: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_technique

    On paper it makes sense as a methodology and it seems like it could deliver what it claims(it doesn't claim to teach you how to survive a street fight) but I don't have many personal account. A sister of my co-worker is a pianist and she apparently got a lot out of it. That's about all I've heard.

  2. #12
    Certified Personal Trainer and Drinker of Coffee supporting member
    CoffeeFan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Sherwood, OR
    Posts
    2,179
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I've tried it. It is beneficial to some in correcting the muscular imbalanced we develop due to poor standing and sitting posture. That being said, I find yoga is a better choice for more people.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Huntington Beach, California
    Posts
    50
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    That's kind of my question, but it was more a question of....
    here let me illustrate-

    MARTIAL ARTS TRAINING-

    my instructor says do this, this way -> I do it, that way.


    MARTIAL ARTS TRAINING+ ALEXANDER SPATIAL AWARENESS TELEKINESIS TECHNIQUE

    my instructor says do this, this way -> I take that, and think in terms of AT how to "improve" it -> I do it, my way -> my instructor punches me in stomach.

    That's what I meant by "filters" you want all your motions to be natural and trying to over process your movements makes you less, wait for it, like "running water"

  4. #14
    DdlR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    4,802
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    AT and the Feldenkrais technique both address, directly and in great detail, certain types of movement, training etc. that many MAs only approach incidentally. Some people prefer their more-or-less scientific method over the "poetics" of traditional Asian pedagogy, even if the results are ultimately similar.

    I can't really address your situation as I already had a couple of decades of MA training behind me when I took my first Feldenkrais class. I can say that that class impressed the hell out of me, particularly the immediately demonstrable, physical results of some very unusual breathing/relaxation/co-ordination exercises.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
    Posts
    790
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I find learning to do proper compound lifts such as squats and deadlifts is great for learning how to efficiently AND safely tackle physical obstacles in life. Grappling teaches great principles as well.

  6. #16
    Jim_Jude's Avatar
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    Sep 2006
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    SoCal
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by shelbydeth View Post
    I find learning to do proper compound lifts such as squats and deadlifts is great for learning how to efficiently AND safely tackle physical obstacles in life. Grappling teaches great principles as well.
    You're not going to learn what Feldenkrais method has to teach from lifting weights.

    Moshe Feldenkrais got his shodan from Kano himself, and was asked to teach Feldenkrais method at the Kodokan repeatedly. He got a lot of inspiration from his Judo training but it's not just Judo, not at all. In fact, your idea of learning the kind of body awareness that Feldenkrais teaches from lifting heavy weights actually made me laugh out loud. It's about as opposite to weight lifting as you can get.
    "Judo is a study of techniques with which you may kill if you wish to kill, injure if you wish to injure, subdue if you wish to subdue, and, when attacked, defend yourself" - Jigoro Kano (1889)
    ***Was this quote "taken out of context"?***

    "The judoist has no time to allow himself a margin for error, especially in a situation upon which his or another person's very life depends...."
    ~ The Secret of Judo (Jiichi Watanabe & Lindy Avakian), p.19

    "Hope is not a method... nor is enthusiasm."
    ~ Brigadier General Gordon Toney

  7. #17
    Jim_Jude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    SoCal
    Posts
    3,555
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by madeofcandy View Post
    That's kind of my question, but it was more a question of....
    here let me illustrate-

    MARTIAL ARTS TRAINING-

    my instructor says do this, this way -> I do it, that way.


    MARTIAL ARTS TRAINING+ ALEXANDER SPATIAL AWARENESS TELEKINESIS TECHNIQUE

    my instructor says do this, this way -> I take that, and think in terms of AT how to "improve" it -> I do it, my way -> my instructor punches me in stomach.

    That's what I meant by "filters" you want all your motions to be natural and trying to over process your movements makes you less, wait for it, like "running water"
    Yeah, you don't "think" your way in improving your movement with Feldenkrais. You do Feldenkrais "right", you'll move better whether you like it or not. Drop the Alexander Technique.

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/13986304/A...rough-Movement

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/19658627/J...ck-Feldenkrais

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/5362905/Hi...do-Ground-Work

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/7402351/Pr...he-Feldenkrais

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/21694209/J...-About-Kuzushi



    Read, read, & read some more. It's all free. There's too much free stuff out there that should be priceless, in my opinion... of course, maybe that's why it's free. What do you do with something that's priceless but you also must share it?
    Ah well, guess it's free!
    Last edited by Jim_Jude; 5/15/2010 4:05am at .
    "Judo is a study of techniques with which you may kill if you wish to kill, injure if you wish to injure, subdue if you wish to subdue, and, when attacked, defend yourself" - Jigoro Kano (1889)
    ***Was this quote "taken out of context"?***

    "The judoist has no time to allow himself a margin for error, especially in a situation upon which his or another person's very life depends...."
    ~ The Secret of Judo (Jiichi Watanabe & Lindy Avakian), p.19

    "Hope is not a method... nor is enthusiasm."
    ~ Brigadier General Gordon Toney

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
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    790
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I wasn't really suggesting it as a substitute, I know nothing of this Feldenkrais method , I just thought I would throw it out there as it is somewhat similiar and has helped me personally.

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