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  1. Rivington is offline
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    Posted On:
    5/13/2010 1:09am

    supporting member
     Style: Taijiquan/Shuai-Chiao/BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Chen episode of Wushu Master

    http://bugu.cntv.cn/sports/other/wul...1/100781.shtml

    Pretty neat episode of a fairly interesting show. This looks like the finals, and even has 19th generation players as judges. The rules are fairly stringent—looks like no strikes to the head, armor under the jacket (which encourages more kicking than we'd otherwise see, I think), resets after a few seconds of non-activity, and nobody is playing to incapacitate. Fun to see regardless.

    I am disappointed to see that Chen Yu has abandoned his pompadour for some sort of Japanese salaryman 'do.

    Also, here's winner Chen Ziqiang pushing with some of his students in Germany.

    YouTube- San Shou Tuishou with Chen Ziqiang
  2. DerAuslander is offline
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    Valiant Monk of Booze & War

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    Posted On:
    5/13/2010 9:53am

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     Style: BJJ/C-JKD/KAAALIII!!!!!!!

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thweet.
  3. Jack Rusher is online now
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    Posted On:
    5/13/2010 9:05pm


     Style: ti da shuai na

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Nice!

    Also, here's a fine description of proper push hands from ChenVillage.com:

    In Chen Village shuaijiao is used as general indication of the overall level of someones Tai Chi. Often a couple of people will go the local training hall and do some shuaijiao much like we will go to a sports club to have a friendly game of squash or badminton. In shuaijiao it is very difficult to kid yourself. Either you and standing up or you are on the ground. In other skills it is much more difficult to get this level of objectivity without risking serious injury.

    Tai Chi shuaijiao differs from other Chinese shuaijiao styles and Japanese judo in the way the legs and arms co-operate. The basic throw consists of three of your limbs exerting force in different directions to spin your opponent round. Since your opponent is often leaning forward to ground the forward force push against him, the axis of the spin is diagonal.

    In addition to this basic throw there are other throws that other experienced martial artists from other disciplines will be familiar with. However the amount of gripping of your opponent is in general less than other shuaijiao styles. Most of the leg techniques attack your opponents knee with either your knee or your foot. The knee level attacks are not done to specifically injure your opponents knee, but to break the balance. Although this style of attack is banned in competitors, there are not usually any serious injuries resulting from them during practice.
    “Most people do not do, but take refuge in theory and talk, thinking that they will become good in this way” -- Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, II.4
  4. Orbz is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/13/2010 9:21pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Tai Chi/BJJ

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks for this. I've seen so many really shitty push hands clips lately; this is refreshing.
  5. Craig Jenkins is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/14/2010 7:02am


     Style: Uechi Ryu, Judo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Great clip - I've never been exposed to this before, and it's very interesting to see. My teacher did some Chen style but it was always just a name to me.

    How much of the body does the protector they are wearing cover? Does it come right up the chest?
  6. Scott Larson is online now
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    Gold Summit Martial Arts Institute

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    Posted On:
    5/14/2010 12:52pm


     Style: Ba Zheng Dao Quan

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thank you.
    ________________________________________

    Authentic Kung Fu in Buffalo, NY

    http://www.buffalokungfu.com


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  7. Rivington is offline
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    Posted On:
    5/14/2010 1:47pm

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     Style: Taijiquan/Shuai-Chiao/BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Craig Jenkins View Post
    Great clip - I've never been exposed to this before, and it's very interesting to see. My teacher did some Chen style but it was always just a name to me.

    How much of the body does the protector they are wearing cover? Does it come right up the chest?
    My eye tells me yes, which also causes some limitations—an attacker cannot "close" as much before opening with an elbow, for example.
  8. nomamao is offline

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    Posted On:
    5/14/2010 2:56pm


     Style: Hung Ga Kung Fu

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Nice. I like the use of the legs, combined with the explosive throwing mechanics he uses.
  9. Rivington is offline
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    Posted On:
    5/14/2010 3:18pm

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     Style: Taijiquan/Shuai-Chiao/BJJ

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by nomamao View Post
    Nice. I like the use of the legs, combined with the explosive throwing mechanics he uses.
    i like that the students are actually trying and playing the same.

    In lots of clips, either the students are being cooperative and then suddenly the teacher turns on the juice, or the students are playing a different game (e.g., they're fixed-stepping and then the teacher puts his own leg under the student's horse and pushes).

    There are good reasons for either—one is just a demo, the second is an example of "wising up the marks" (the student is supposed to ultimately sense the cheat and stop it) but often students are never let in on the trick and instead they put all sorts of dumb **** up on YouTube and crow about the power of tui shou.
  10. timo is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/03/2010 8:39pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: muay thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks for putting that up,

    I used to practice chen and spent some time in the village training. that's kind of what led me away from tjq and into other more alive arts.

    i grew up training forms, fixed step pushing hands and bit of moving step and compliant applications. i did seminars with chen xiao wang, who i thought represented "real tjq" and then focus on forms, fixed step pushing hands and compliant applications was reinforced.

    going to china and having my ass kicked everyday was a shock and also hugely enjoyable. chen ziqiang was obviously fully dedicated to kicking arse; sure his forms were great, but he also lifted weights and wrestled his arse off every day. it made me feel dumb and cheated.

    i hope that the driving force in the chen tai ji quan world will shift from older family members touring the world and refining peoples forms and creating disciples. to the younger generation teaching and encouraging this type of competition world wide. maybe it's already happened! been a long time since i was in that community in the uk.
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