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  1. maofas is offline
    maofas's Avatar

    Senior Member

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    Posted On:
    4/22/2010 10:57am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kenkojuku Karate, Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Personally, I've found vacations to be detrimental. Often a person just plans on a short break, but it turns into a much longer break. You know how the longer you stay out of touch with a friend the harder it is to call them? Same principal IMO.

    Any day I don't have to practice I feel full of energy/jumpy and wish fervently I had someone to do a little rolling/pads with. Any day I DO have to practice I feel tired and unmotivated and don't want to go.

    In 18 years so far of practicing MA I've never once felt, "Omg I can't wait to get to class tonight!" However, I've also never once failed to be 100% into it once I actually arrive and get started. Inertia is the real killer.

    The key is to push through that feeling and go anyways, because it's important to set a precedence for yourself of being the type of person who never misses practice. Once you establish a trend, good or bad, it becomes taboo to deviate from it which helps balance out the inertia trying to keep you in your computer chair.
  2. Tom .C is offline

    Senior Member

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    Posted On:
    4/22/2010 11:22am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Aikido,Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Sometimes a slump requires a change of focus. It was already mentioned that picking some aspect of your game that needs improvement and working on that will often get you back into the game. Setting small goals and noting their accomplishment will help you remember that your practice is not wasted time. I've worked through a lot of slumps and unless it is pressure from unrelated issues, working on the smaller things really helps to improve your perspective.
  3. Kintanon is offline
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    Yes, I am smarter than you are.

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    Posted On:
    4/22/2010 11:46am

    supporting memberstaff
     Style: TKD, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by maofas View Post
    Personally, I've found vacations to be detrimental. Often a person just plans on a short break, but it turns into a much longer break. You know how the longer you stay out of touch with a friend the harder it is to call them? Same principal IMO.

    Any day I don't have to practice I feel full of energy/jumpy and wish fervently I had someone to do a little rolling/pads with. Any day I DO have to practice I feel tired and unmotivated and don't want to go.

    In 18 years so far of practicing MA I've never once felt, "Omg I can't wait to get to class tonight!" However, I've also never once failed to be 100% into it once I actually arrive and get started. Inertia is the real killer.

    The key is to push through that feeling and go anyways, because it's important to set a precedence for yourself of being the type of person who never misses practice. Once you establish a trend, good or bad, it becomes taboo to deviate from it which helps balance out the inertia trying to keep you in your computer chair.
    Wow, that's crazy. I count down the minutes until I get to go to class. Whenever I'm not doin jits I wish I were. Whenever I have to miss a few classes for work I get agitated and hyped up and wired. On the days when I have class I look forward to it all day.
  4. slideyfoot is offline
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    Artemis BJJ Co-Founder/Instructor

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    Posted On:
    4/22/2010 1:37pm

    Business Class Supporting Membersupporting member
     Artemis BJJ | Brazilian Jiu Jitsu in Bristol Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by snowman View Post
    I know everyone goes through this, and it isn't my livelihood, it is just a hobby, but eh, no goals, no fun, no training? [...]

    So long story short, advice to get over training slump.
    The bit on my FAQ is about frustration, but it seems related to the kind of thing you're talking about:

    Focus on a small number of techniques and concentrate on just working those in sparring. It may even just be that you steadily work one tiny part of a particular technique - perhaps where you want your hands to be at a certain point - but that all contributes to eventually getting the technique right, and in turn means you're being constructive and have a clear goal to work towards.

    I also find a technique-focused method of training helps with motivation, as it's a useful way of ignoring ego: you're not thinking about 'winning' or 'losing', just making technical improvements. It doesn't matter if you get tapped along the way.

    Following on from that, I'd strongly recommend keeping a training log, like others have already. Personally, I've found doing so has been of massive benefit to my training: to copy what I wrote somewhere else, for a start it makes it easier to remember technique. The process of putting what you've just learned into words means you have to carefully think about exactly what you did in class. Even if your memory of it isn't that great, that will still mean you know specifically which parts you're unsure about, so can then ask your instructor next time you train.

    That also helps with recollecting terminology, which I find can be a big problem in BJJ. Of course, that normally means you only learn the terminology used in your particular school, but still of benefit. Ideally, I'd like to be able to learn the most common terms used globally, as well as just in my school: it then becomes easier to search places like the net for hints and tips on specific techniques.

    In addition to remembering technique, writing notes also means you can track your own progress, and identify what you feel you need to work on. As with writing up techniques, that then means you can concentrate on what went 'wrong', for want of a better word, asking your instructor and training partners how you could improve. So in effect, your notes become an action plan for the next sparring session.

    Also, read this fantastic thread, if you haven't already. This is also well worth a look, as is this blog post.
  5. shelbydeth is offline

    Registered Member

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    Posted On:
    4/22/2010 2:09pm


     Style: MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by maofas View Post
    Any day I don't have to practice I feel full of energy/jumpy and wish fervently I had someone to do a little rolling/pads with. Any day I DO have to practice I feel tired and unmotivated and don't want to go.

    In 18 years so far of practicing MA I've never once felt, "Omg I can't wait to get to class tonight!" However, I've also never once failed to be 100% into it once I actually arrive and get started. Inertia is the real killer.
    It's like you're in my brain man.
  6. maofas is offline
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    Senior Member

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    Posted On:
    4/22/2010 4:42pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kenkojuku Karate, Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    ^
    That's why I said it's important to establish a rhythm of not missing class ever. You feel inertia much less if it's extremely habitual to go to class no matter what. Every time you skip it's that much easier to skip. I've seen so many people come and go and come back and quit again over the years already and I'm not old yet; I think if they understood all this they'd be able to become more consistent.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kintanon View Post
    Wow, that's crazy.
    It is, but the important thing is to understand your own craziness so you know when to not listen to your feelings and just do what you're supposed to do/what you really want to do.
    Last edited by maofas; 4/22/2010 4:53pm at .
  7. Uncle Skippy is offline

    See my tongue. SEE IT!

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    Posted On:
    4/22/2010 7:51pm

    Business Class Supporting Member
      Style: BJJ, MT, TKD

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Do you have other places to train? Would they let you drop in at times?

    I drift between 2 schools and the variety keeps me interested. If I don't do this, I get run down with a mundane / repetitive routine and start missing classes.

    Even if it is once a week, it has helped me stay interested. That is just the way my mind works though.

    Have you tried changing up your routine a bit?
  8. pauli is offline

    i keep tryin to spar, but nothin happens!

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    Posted On:
    4/22/2010 8:33pm

    supporting member
     Style: karate / bjj

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    ++ to that. if i didn't crosstrain, i'd be completely burned out a dozen times over. having two sets of training partners really has its benefits.
  9. snowman is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/22/2010 9:30pm


     Style: sadness and tears

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Sang View Post
    What works for me is to change the focus of my training, if Muay Thai in particular is bumming me out I'll spend 3 months working mainly on improving one aspect of it such as the clinch or I'll reduce the number of sessions and focus on weights/sprint training.

    Another good method is to start writing a training log, getting your thoughts down on paper is a great way to figure out where you want to be heading with your training.
    Quote Originally Posted by tao.jonez View Post
    Set a specific goal and a specific time frame to reach it.

    So instead of "lose some weight" try "lose 10 lbs of fat by June 15".

    Instead of "get better at BJJ" you could "pull off one armbar every class". And really study/work armbars for a couple months.

    Shave 3 minutes off your 3 mile run time by May 30th.

    A specific, attainable, and measurable goal can really help put you on track.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kintanon View Post
    I second the training log idea, also start reading other peoples training logs. I have one at kintanon.blogspot.com, slideyfoot has one at www.slideyfoot.com there are a few others around.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom .C View Post
    Sometimes a slump requires a change of focus. It was already mentioned that picking some aspect of your game that needs improvement and working on that will often get you back into the game. Setting small goals and noting their accomplishment will help you remember that your practice is not wasted time. I've worked through a lot of slumps and unless it is pressure from unrelated issues, working on the smaller things really helps to improve your perspective.
    Quote Originally Posted by slideyfoot View Post
    The bit on my FAQ is about frustration, but it seems related to the kind of thing you're talking about:

    Focus on a small number of techniques and concentrate on just working those in sparring. It may even just be that you steadily work one tiny part of a particular technique - perhaps where you want your hands to be at a certain point - but that all contributes to eventually getting the technique right, and in turn means you're being constructive and have a clear goal to work towards.

    I also find a technique-focused method of training helps with motivation, as it's a useful way of ignoring ego: you're not thinking about 'winning' or 'losing', just making technical improvements. It doesn't matter if you get tapped along the way.

    Following on from that, I'd strongly recommend keeping a training log, like others have already. Personally, I've found doing so has been of massive benefit to my training: to copy what I wrote somewhere else, for a start it makes it easier to remember technique.

    I'm seeing a trend! I used to have a little technique log that I would write what techniques I learned that class but that dropped off to the side. All the things you guys have said I "know", it seems I've just forgotten or become complacent about how great training aids they can be to get re-focused and set some new goals.


    I used to go in with a technique of the day/week plan, but somewhere along the line sessions in my mind turned into, warm up, do technique 20 minutes spar, or warm up spar, rinse repeat


    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie Hardon View Post
    'Cos when your Over-train, you get Stale.


    True


    Quote Originally Posted by maofas View Post
    Personally, I've found vacations to be detrimental. Often a person just plans on a short break, but it turns into a much longer break. You know how the longer you stay out of touch with a friend the harder it is to call them? Same principal IMO.

    I can see how that would happen



    Quote Originally Posted by maofas View Post
    Any day I don't have to practice I feel full of energy/jumpy and wish fervently I had someone to do a little rolling/pads with. Any day I DO have to practice I feel tired and unmotivated and don't want to go.
    That's the thing, this is how I used to feel, not so much recently, hence the slumpiness, and my concerns about dropping off completely which I dont want

    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Skippy View Post
    Do you have other places to train? Would they let you drop in at times?

    I drift between 2 schools and the variety keeps me interested. If I don't do this, I get run down with a mundane / repetitive routine and start missing classes.

    Even if it is once a week, it has helped me stay interested. That is just the way my mind works though.

    Have you tried changing up your routine a bit?


    The only largish change that I did was switch to lifting 4 days for 4 weeks doing the smolov jr deadlift program (awesome program btw) - but no not really


    Quote Originally Posted by pauli View Post
    ++ to that. if i didn't crosstrain, i'd be completely burned out a dozen times over. having two sets of training partners really has its benefits.

    Have thought about getting back into kickboxing, might be a nice change




    Good advice peoples, will look to implement
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